10 Black Athletes Who Went Back to College to

Emmitt SmithSix years after he left Florida and while he was in the midst of becoming the most prolific running back in NFL history, Emmitt Smith went back to college and earned a degree in public recreation. Jarrett JackAfter his junior season, Jarrett Jack (center) left Georgia Tech to enter the 2005 NBA Draft. It was his decision to go, but he promised his parents that he would eventually go back to earn his college degree. It took Jack a while — nine years, to be exact — but the Brooklyn Nets guard earned his degree in business management. Said Jack: “My parents always told me that nobody can predict tomorrow or how long anything is gonna last. Just trying to cover yourself on all grounds and have people respect you on all fronts and not just be just a basketball player. I really owe it to my parents.” read more

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Are The Giants Sneaking Up On Us Again

In 2007, the Giants’ passing attack through 10 games wasn’t very good (and it would only get worse: The team finished the regular season at 22nd in adjusted net yards per attempt and 24th in passer rating). The running game (more on this in a minute) is what powered the team. But Eli Manning had some of his best games in the playoffs, particularly in the first two games.In 2011, the Giants were defined by the passing offense: Manning had one of his best seasons, teaming with wide receivers Victor Cruz and Hakeem Nicks. Manning again played better in the postseason, particularly in the early rounds.This year? Despite highlights from Manning and Odell Beckham Jr. and the success of rookie Sterling Shepard, the Giants have had a mediocre passing attack. They rank 19th in passing EPA and 16th in ANY/A. There’s obvious upside with Manning and Beckham, but if the Giants go on a Super Bowl run, the data suggests that the passing offense won’t be behind it.Rushing offense In 2007, the Giants’ offense was centered around Brandon Jacobs and Derrick Ward, with spot appearances by Reuben Droughns and rookie Ahmad Bradshaw. The ground game ranked fourth in yards and yards per carry.But even though the Earth, Wind and Fire Giants carried over their rushing success into 2008, the running game has been more of a weakness than a strength in more recent years. In 2011, the Giants finished dead last in both yards and yards per carry. And once again, the Giants can’t seem to piece together a running game. This season, New York ranks 31st in yards and 30th in yards per carry, with the underwhelming Rashad Jennings the leader in an unimpressive committee. The veteran back is averaging an anemic 3.40 yards per carry, 38th out of 43 qualifying rushers.With this year’s Giants featuring a mediocre passing game and a bad running game, you’ve probably figured out that it’s not the offense carrying the team.Pass defense It’s easy to dismiss the success of the 7-3 New York Giants. The team ranks 23rd in scoring, tied with the 49ers, and is 11th in points allowed; overall, the Giants have outscored opponents by only 4 points all year. In fact, the Giants haven’t won a single game by more than 7 points. Meanwhile, they rank 20th in yards per game and 16th in yards allowed per game and have benefited from a favorable schedule: The team has played only three true road games this year.1The Giants have played six games at home; they also played one game in London, against the Rams.Ahead of Week 11’s games, the Giants ranked 16th in both ESPN’s NFL Power Rankings and Football Outsiders’ Defense-adjusted Value Over Average, and their 6-point home win against a bad Bears team is unlikely to move those needles. And even after Sunday’s win, the Giants rank only 17th in FiveThirtyEight’s NFL Elo ratings.So the Giants are just an average team that has lucked into a good record, right? That’s an easy conclusion, but the Giants have a history of sneaking up on the rest of the NFL, as they did in 2007 and 2011:In 2007, New York was 7-3 through 10 games but imploded in the team’s 11th game. Against Minnesota, Eli Manning threw three pick sixes (he would finish the year with 20 picks, tied for the league lead).In 2011, the Giants through 10 games had scored 228 points and allowed 228 points, leading to a 6-4 record.At the time, neither of those teams seemed very noteworthy, and they finished with 10-6 and 9-7 records, respectively. Our current simulations have this year’s Giants finishing with 9.9 wins, which would put them right in line with those other good but not great Giants teams.Of course, both of those Giants teams wound up winning the Super Bowl. Is there any reason to think this year’s team could similarly surprise in the playoffs? To find out, let’s use expected points added to measure how the Giants have fared in every season (through 10 games) going back to 2006.2The first year for which we have EPA data. And while EPA does not adjust for era, we have adjusted those numbers on a per-play basis to account for those differences. I took an average of the per-play EPA for passing and rushing plays from 2006 to 2016 and then adjusted each season of team EPA data based on how the per-play average in a given season differed from the per-play average overall.Pass offense The 2007 and 2011 Giants were both strong against the run, but this year’s squad is even stronger. The Giants currently rank eighth in rushing yards allowed per game and fifth in yards per carry allowed. The additions of Harrison and Vernon have transformed the defensive line, after the defense ranked in the bottom half of the league in most rushing categories last year.ConclusionThe defense is the clear strength of this year’s Giants team, and it’s in a better position through 10 games than the defenses were during those Super Bowl-winning seasons. That’s a good thing, because unlike in those championship seasons, Eli Manning and the Giants offense are playing at or below league average — not exactly in position to carry a team on a late-season winning streak. So if the Giants make a run for the Super Bowl, it may be less likely to resemble Eli Manning’s two Super Bowl teams and more likely to resemble Eli’s brother’s team last year.Check out our latest NFL predictions. The most enduring image of the 2007 Giants is likely the beating that the team gave Tom Brady and the undefeated New England Patriots, but it’s easy to forget that through 10 games, that team was below average against the pass. Same goes for the 2011 version, which was among the worst teams in the league at defending the pass until it got its act together down the stretch.Last year, the pass defense was the Giants’ downfall — the team ranked 28th in EPA and 29th in ANY/A allowed, factors that led to the team finishing 30th in points allowed and last in yards allowed. The Giants finished 6-10, with opposing quarterbacks leading five fourth-quarter comebacks against them and a sixth loss involving another blown lead in the final minute.In the offseason, the Giants spent a ton of money to improve the defense. The team re-signed Jason Pierre-Paul; added Olivier Vernon, Janoris Jenkins and Damon Harrison; and drafted cornerback Eli Apple in the first round. Those additions have paid dividends, and safety Landon Collins, selected 33rd overall last year, has been a huge part of the team’s turnaround. This year, the Giants rank eighth in pass EPA and fifth in ANY/A allowed, and the pass defense is the strength of the team in a way it hasn’t been in years.Rush defense read more

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Did The Referees Ruin The Mens NCAA Championship

Embed Code More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed FiveThirtyEight Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (Apr. 4, 2017), we say goodbye to March Madness and break down the women’s and men’s NCAA championship games. Next, we investigate why NBA teams are resting their players early and often. Plus, a significant digit on Madison Bumgarner.FiveThirtyEight’s Benjamin Morris argues that Mississippi State earned every bit of their upset over UConn.Mississippi State ultimately lost the women’s championship game to South Carolina.Neil Paine notes that even though the men’s championship was tough to watch, UNC played ugly enough to win.That was not a good national title game, writes ESPN’s Myron Medcalf.The Ringer’s Rodger Sherman says it wasn’t UNC players who won the night — it was the referees.NBA teams are resting players earlier and earlier, Todd Whitehead writes for FiveThirtyEight.Significant Digit: 16.5, the average number of at-bats that San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner takes between hitting home runs, since 2014. Last Sunday, Bumgarner hit two home runs and became the first pitcher to hit more than one on Opening Day. read more

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Comeback effort falls short as OSU falls to Penn State 42

Members of the OSU men’s soccer team celebrate during a 4-1 win against Rutgers on Oct. 25, 2014, at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. Credit: Lantern File PhotoThe Ohio State men’s soccer team headed to University Park fresh off the heels of its first win of the season, a 1-0 victory at home against the Northwestern Wildcats where they dominated possession. They looked to carry that momentum with them as they took on Penn State on Tuesday night, but fell shortThe Nittany Lions quickly brought the Buckeyes back to reality, scoring on their very first shot in the first minute of the game en route to a 4-2 victory over OSU.The game was a tale of two very different halves, the first of which was all Penn State.Just 47 seconds into the match, the Nittany Lions were able to find the back of the net on a shot by senior midfielder Mason Klerks from 19 yards out on an assist from senior forward Connor Maloney.Both Klerks and Maloney played an extensive role in Penn State’s dominating first period.In the 26th minute, Klerks would put one through again on a header off a free kick from Maloney, his second goal of the night and second of the season.Maloney would finish with three assists and a goal, coming on the strength of a penalty kick in the 28th minute.After the first 45 minutes of play, Penn State held a 4-0 lead, despite OSU having the advantage in shots at 7-5 and corner kicks at 7-0.In the second half, the Buckeyes were able to start to put things together.In the 66th minute, senior defender Austin Bergstrom was able to bury a penalty kick to get the Buckeyes on the board, his first goal of the season.Ohio State was again able to beat Penn State’s freshman goalkeeper Arie Ammann when sophomore midfielder Abdi Mohamed placed a nice arching shot into the left of the net from 25 yards out.In the end, the Buckeyes comeback efforts would not be enough to erase their early deficit. They outshot Penn State 12-7 with an 8-1 advantage in corner kicks, but walked away with their fifth loss of the yearIt was a rough match for Ohio State redshirt freshman goalkeeper Parker Siegfried, who before the match was named the Big Ten Defensive Player of the Week. Siegfried recorded his first career shutout in the win over Northwestern.The Buckeyes will play their third Big Ten contest in a row when they take on Rutgers this Sunday, Sept. 18 at 2 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

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All eyes on the top 5 Golfers to watch at the Memorial

The PGA Tour rolls into central Ohio and will make its annual stop at Dublin’s Muirfield Village Golf Club today. Here is a list of the top five players who have a shot at competing for the Memorial Tournament title. 1. Justin Rose Rose enters this year’s Memorial Tournament as defending champion, and seems to be the perfect candidate to pick up where he left off one year ago. He came back from a four-stroke deficit entering the final round in 2010 and, with his 66-shot final-round score, earned his first-ever PGA Tour victory. During the this year’s tour, Rose has made the cut in 11 of the 12 events he has played, including three top-10 finishes. Rose’s solid play so far this year makes him a player to watch throughout the weekend. 2. Luke Donald Donald is coming off a week in which he won the European Tour’s BMW PGA Championship in England, and also claimed the No. 1 spot in the Official World Golf Rankings for the first time in his career. The victory marked Donald’s second of the year on all tours and should have him flying high upon his arrival at Muirfield Village. Donald also comes into this week having finished in the top 10 in seven of the eight PGA events he has played this year. If he can ride the momentum across back to the U.S., Donald should be a heavy favorite this week. 3. Bubba Watson While Watson has finished no better than tied for 23rd (2007 and 2009) in his five starts at Muirfield, he’s enjoying his most successful season on tour. Watson is one of just two players on tour with multiple wins this season, and is first in the FedEx Cup point standings. Watson is second on tour in driving distance and first in reaching greens in regulation percentage. The key for Watson this week is putting. The Memorial is notorious for quick greens, and, if Watson putts well, he should remain in contention for the title. 4. Rickie Fowler This year’s Memorial Tournament is all about redemption for Fowler. After tying a tournament-record 13-under par through the first 36-holes, and maintaining a three-shot lead after the third round, Fowler looked poised to win his first-ever PGA tournament at last year’s Memorial. A bogey on the 10th hole and a double bogey on the 12th undid Fowler’s strong start and allowed Rose to take the win. Fowler has struggled lately, failing to finish inside the top 10 of a PGA event in nearly three months. Look for Fowler to return to Muirfield with a chip on his shoulder and something to prove. 5. Phil Mickelson Mickelson has already won once on tour this season with a three-shot victory at the Shell Houston Open on April 3, and returns to Muirfield after a tie for fifth in the 2010 Memorial. Mickelson has posted three top-10 finishes in his 11 starts at Muirfield. Don’t be surprised to see Lefty’s name near the top of the leaderboard this weekend. read more

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Ohio Machines Chazz Woodson balances on off the field aspirations

Chazz Woodson is a Major League Lacrosse player for the Ohio Machine, but the Brown University graduate said his athletic prowess isn’t the only thing that defines him. “Professional lacrosse is three days a week for 14 weeks and a summer,” Woodson said. “Lacrosse is a small piece of what we do.” Woodson, who made an appearance an ESPN’s Top 10 plays segment for an acrobatic goal, aspires for a career outside of athletics to improve childhood education. He even taught in a low-income area for two years out of college. “At the end of the day I’m not trying to be the best lacrosse player in the world, that’s not my end goal,” Woodson said. “It’s great that getting recognized for my lacrosse talent is giving me the opportunity to do these other things, that at the end of the day, those other things are what I really want to succeed in and people to recognize me for.” The “other things” are a long list of work outside the white-painted lines of the lacrosse field. During Woodson’s senior year of college, he and other Brown University student-athletes developed Makin’ Moves, a mentoring program through the Education Department at Brown. The program was inspired by Woodson’s personal experience teaching in Manhattan through the Urban Education Semester program offered at Brown. The (UES) program introduces students to difficult issues faced in urban public education, according to their mission statement. The Makin’ Moves mentoring program is designed to help student-athletes of color develop skills in preparation for the standards of higher education. “I know for at least a good five years (Makin’ Moves) was up and running and doing some positive things,” Woodson said. “Not only were we able to help kids, but other student-athletes at Brown really took into the idea and wanted to continue it.” Machine coach Ted Garber said he is happy to have Woodson be a part of the Machine because he is such a well-rounded person. “His heart is helping kids develop mentally, good lacrosse skills, but good values and ethics,” Garber said. “He is not just a great lacrosse player, but a great person.” Woodson made it clear that he understands the importance of the game with respect to everything else he is involved in. “One thing I really enjoy doing, and lacrosse has given me the platform to do it, is inspiring people and motivating people,” Woodson said. With that in mind, Woodson decided to get back into the education system, this time as a teacher for the Teach For America program. Woodson was assigned to the Miami-Dade County Public School system during his first two years out of college. He began teaching fourth-grade students at Phyllis Wheatley Elementary School in the Miami neighborhood of Overtown. “Every Teach For America school has its own issues, so I definitely had my ups and downs in the classroom,” Woodson said. “My experience was unbelievably valuable and in many ways rewarding.” Woodson spent two years in the school system and said that after coming out of the experience, he developed a love for that area. “As I continue to develop the lacrosse initiatives down here, that’s one area that I want to focus on,” Woodson said. “Despite the fact that I’m not teaching there anymore, I still would like to affect change in the area.” In 2009, Woodson was injured and didn’t play a full season. In that same year, Woodson co-founded the creation of Dade Lacrosse, Inc., which is helping to raise awareness of the game and promoting a youth league in that area. In 2010 he was injured, traded, and then deactivated from the MLL. “I just felt like I had more to offer this league and this sport than what I was able to put forth in the last two years of playing MLL,” Woodson said. “This was just kind of a perfect storm.” The Machine selected Woodson in the 2012 MLL Supplemental Draft in an announcement the MLL made on Dec. 14. “He is a matchup nightmare,” said Ohio Machine general manager and president John Algie. “His ability forces other teams to be creative in a way that they’re going to defend him. Even if they are able to slow him down, that’s really only opening things up for other people.” Woodson, who plays the attack position, is known for his rare style of play. During a win against Rochester on May 19, he made a play that landed him on SportsCenter’s Top 10. “Lacrosse is meant to be played creatively, and that’s what I really enjoy about it,” Woodson said. “It’s not necessarily something I go out and try to do every time, but it’s tough to stop somebody when they’re right on top of the goal.” Garber said he hasn’t really given Woodson any boundaries out on the field and that Woodson’s footwork, quickness and vision are tough traits for defenses to handle. Woodson is the leading scorer for the Machine with nine goals. Algie said it’s the work by guys like Woodson that make the lacrosse one of the fastest-growing sport in the country. “When you have the opportunity to present yourself to the world, you have to do it in the right way,” Woodson said. “Lacrosse is not the be all and end all for me, I am well aware of that; I was taught that long, long ago.” read more

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Opinion Coldweather Super Bowl poses big risk reward for NFL

MetLife Stadium will play host to Super Bowl XLVIII Feb. 2.Courtesy of MCTSan Diego, Houston, Miami, New Orleans. East Rutherford, New Jersey?One of these Super Bowl host cities, quite clearly, is not like the others.The National Football League’s decision to host Super Bowl XLVIII in a cold-weather city — specifically one without a suitable indoor venue — has become a frequent target for criticism during the weeks leading up to the big game. Set to kickoff on Sunday, at 6:25 p.m., this year’s Super Bowl — which pits the Denver Broncos and their league-best offense against the Seattle Seahawks’ No.1-ranked defense — has been somewhat upstaged by the weather forecast.Back in 2010, when NFL commissioner Roger Goodell announced that the first-ever outdoor, cold-weather Super Bowl would be played in New Jersey, the decision produced mixed reviews. Since that time, the sense of concern has risen as the challenges of hosting the nation’s most-watched sporting event under the harsh conditions of winter have come into focus.There is no doubt that Goodell and the NFL owners took a gamble in selecting MetLife Stadium to host the 48th version of the Super Bowl. It remains to be seen as to whether or not they will be rewarded for that risk.Theoretically, bringing the greatest spectacle in American sports to the New York metropolitan area is a recipe for an unprecedented amount of hype. In practice, however, the “crash-and-burn” potential of a “Big Apple” Super Bowl rivals that of one of MetLife Stadium’s familiar occupants — The New York Jets.According to Weather.com, February is the tri-state area’s snowiest month with an average of 9.5 inches of precipitation. At this time last year, Winter Storm Nemo buried the city under 10 inches of snow.Low and behold, when the Farmers’ Almanac was released last August, it predicted that a major winter storm would hit the Northeast around the time of Super Bowl Sunday. Last week, more than 1,300 workers could be found shoveling inside MetLife Stadium after it was blanketed with 13 inches of snow.Several media outlets have already begun discussing the chances of a Super Bowl Saturday or Monday in the event of severe weather — a scenario that league officials have conceded as a remote possibility. On Jan. 23, NJ.com reported that NFL Executive Vice President Eric Grubman said the game could be played anytime between Friday and Monday, if necessary.Fortunately, the current weather forecast for Sunday is favorable, calling for a high of 39 degrees and placing the chance of rain or snow at just 20 percent. Assuming those predictions hold true, the conditions will be manageable—just don’t expect the Red Hot Chili Peppers to sport their usual shirtless look when they join Bruno Mars on stage for the halftime show.In an interview with the New York Daily News, Goodell stood by the league’s choice of MetLife Stadium.“We made the decision that football is played in the elements and so we recognize that and we made a decision to do that. Championship games are often played in inclement weather,” Goodell said. “We had several games that were played in inclement weather, including playoff games this year. That’s football.”The commissioner does have a point. There is something quite romantic about the prospect of the Super Bowl being played on a snow-covered field at The Meadowlands. However, in the event that America’s de facto national holiday — the Super Bowl — is interfered with, the results will be anything but romantic for Goodell and the NFL. read more

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Womens lacrosse Eleven Buckeyes score Rizzo shuts out Dukes in second half

Ohio State freshman midfielder Liza Hernandez looks to pass in the offensive zone against Stanford on Feb. 24 at Ohio Stadium. Credit: James King | Lantern reporterThe Ohio State women’s lacrosse team continued its winning ways, beating the Duquesne Dukes 17-5 on Friday afternoon. The Buckeyes had no shortage of offense with 11 different players scoring, but they were led to victory by sophomore midfielder Baley Parrott’s four-goal outing.The Scarlet and Gray are now 5-1 on the season after the team’s 14th win over the Dukes in 17 meetings.Duquesne opened up the scoring just 16 seconds into play, but the Buckeyes retaliated with three goals, giving them an early lead. Junior attacker Molly Wood and two New Albany High School graduates — senior midfielder Morgan Fee and freshman midfielder Liza Hernandez — netted the goals for the Buckeyes.The Dukes would tie the game up at three goals a piece with 19:27 remaining in the half after goals from freshman defender Maddie Hart and junior attacker Jill Vacanti. OSU would begin their barrage of goals with two goals from freshman attacker Alex Vander Molen and two goals from Parrott.Duquesne would cut into the Buckeye lead with two more goals right before the end of the first half, the latest of which came with just 15 seconds remaining. However, that would be the final time that the Dukes beat freshman goalie Jill Rizzo as OSU shut the Dukes out for the entire second half.The Buckeyes have been one of the most prolific offenses in the Big Ten this season, averaging 13.8 goals per game. This latest outpour of goals was just the most recent example of the volatility of their attack.In the second half, Hernandez began OSU’s 10-goal run just 44 seconds after the restart. From then on OSU continued to fill up the net. Parrott scored her third with sophomore midfielder Erika Keselman scoring within the next minute, pushing the Buckeyes’ lead to five.Junior midfielder Shannon Rosati scored her second goal of the year with 21:45 left on the clock. Wood scored her second goal of the day — rounding out her two-goal and three-assist game — off of a Hernandez helper. OSU would hold Duquesne to just 20 shots on the day while registering 44 of their own. Freshman goalie Jill Rizzo had more saves (7) than goals allowed (5).The Buckeyes added six more goals before the end of the game, including sophomore attacker Sara Dickinson’s first of the year. Junior attacker Lauren Sherry netted her second of the season before Parrott scored her fourth unassisted goal of the game. Two freshman would score their first collegiate goals when midfielder Regina Doty and attackman Jaclen Moxley found the back of the net finishing off OSU’s thwarting of the Dukes 17-5.The Buckeyes will need all of this production to continue as their next game is against the No. 8 Notre Dame Fighting Irish in South Bend, Indiana at 7 p.m. on Tuesday. read more

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Baseball Ohio States bullpen locks down 74 win against Nebraska for first

Ohio State junior catcher Jacob Barnwell tips his cap following a three-run home run against Nebraska Saturday in Bill Davis Stadium. Credit: Mac Connor | Ohio State Athletics.The Nebraska baseball team seemed primed to bust the game wide open in the top of the seventh inning. Having come back from a 4-0 deficit, the Cornhuskers were back within a run at 5-4 with runners on second and third with no outs following a throwing error by Ohio State third baseman Conner Pohl.However, the Ohio State bullpen had other ideas, shutting down the rally and holding Nebraska at four runs to give the Buckeyes (18-8, 1-1 Big Ten) a 7-4 win against the Huskers (14-13, 2-3 Big Ten) Saturday afternoon in Bill Davis Stadium, the first conference win for Ohio State.Ohio State freshman pitcher Griffan Smith entered the game for junior starter Ryan Feltner to face pinch-hitting sophomore Joe Acker in the then-one-run game. Acker chopped a ground ball down the third-base line. Smith gloved it, looked the runner back to third, turned and fired a throw to first for the first out of the inning.Nebraska sophomore left fielder Mojo Hagge flied out with no runners advancing. Senior pitcher Seth Kinker entered the game and finished the inning off by forcing a groundout for the third out.“That’s the highlight of the game for me,” coach Greg Beals said. “You bring a freshman in, and his first series in Big Ten play with runners on second and third and nobody out, and he gets two big outs for us.” Back-to-back singles began Ohio State’s fourth inning, which put runners on the corners with one out for junior designated hitter Nate Romans. Romans failed to deliver, striking out on a low breaking ball from junior Nebraska starter Matt Waldron.Then junior catcher Jacob Barnwell turned on a 2-1 pitch and sent it over the left-field fence for a three-run blast to give Ohio State a 4-0 lead.Hagge led off the game with a double. It took four innings before the Huskers recorded another base hit against Feltner, with freshman right fielder Jaxon Hallmark drilling an RBI triple to score Nebraska’s first run.“[Feltner] left the fastball up there and they got the triple to right-center field,” Beals said. “One pitch he’d like to have back I think.”Feltner struck out the next batter for the second out, and got ahead 0-1 on sophomore Ben Klenke. The following pitch hit the shoulder of home-plate umpire Wayne Harris and ricocheted over the netting behind the plate out of play. Hallmark was given home plate and the score was 4-2.Feltner finished the game allowing just four runs (three earned) over six innings with five hits, two walks and six strikeouts. “Every single out, [Feltner]’s just getting better and better,” Barnwell said. “He’s just got his confidence built up now where no matter what pitch we throw down, he’s gonna execute it where he wants it and get the batter out.”Ohio State sophomore right fielder Dominic Canzone singled and stole a base in the fifth inning. McGowan brought him home with a double, his conference-leading 34th RBI of the season to extend the lead to 5-2.Nebraska first baseman Scott Schreiber responded with his second home run in as many days to make it a 5-3 game.With Ohio State adding two more runs for insurance in the seventh and eighth innings, Kinker hurled the final 2.1 innings of the victory for his fifth save of the season.“[You’ve seen me go to Kinker] earlier than you’d ideally like to,” Beals said. “I thought that was game-winning situation though and I thought we needed to have our best guy out there at that time.In addition to a 3-for-4 day at the plate, McGowan made a pair of key diving plays on ground balls during an all-around strong defensive performance at first. read more

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The Best Damn Pod In The Land Episode 7 The Top Ranked

Wyatt and Colin discuss Ohio State football’s 49-26 win over Indiana, and how the Buckeyes should fix the pass defense and rush offense moving into Minnesota, Ohio State’s No. 1 ranking in men’s hockey, the women’s hockey series split against No. 8 Colgate and men’s soccer’s continued woes.

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