Breast Cancer Basics – What You Should Know About Mammograms And…

first_imgThe goal of the Paint the Town Pink campaign is to get women, age 40 and older, to schedule their annual mammograms and to raise funds for screening mammograms for women who can’t afford them. Here are questions and answers about mammography and breast cancer from the National Institute of Cancer.What is a mammogram?A mammogram is an x-ray picture of the breast.
Mammograms can be used to check for breast cancer in women who have no signs or symptoms of the disease. This type of mammogram is called a screening mammogram. Screening mammograms usually involve two x-ray pictures, or images, of each breast. The x-ray images make it possible to detect tumors that can’t be felt. Screening mammograms can also find microcalcifications (tiny deposits of calcium) that sometimes indicate the presence of breast cancer.
Mammograms can also be used to check for breast cancer after a lump or other sign or symptom of the disease has been found. This type of mammogram is called a diagnostic mammogram. Signs of breast cancer may include pain, skin thickening, nipple discharge, or a change in breast size or shape; however, these signs may also be indicators of benign conditions. A diagnostic mammogram can also be used to evaluate changes found during a screening mammogram or to view breast tissue when it is difficult to obtain a screening mammogram because of special circumstances, such as the presence of breast implants.How are screening and diagnostic mammograms different?Diagnostic mammography takes longer than screening mammography because more x-rays are needed to obtain views of the breast from several angles. The technician may magnify a suspicious area to produce a detailed picture that can help the doctor make an accurate diagnosis.What are the benefits of screening mammograms?Early detection of breast cancer with screening mammography means that treatment can be started earlier in the course of the disease, possibly before it has spread. Results from randomized clinical trials and other studies show that screening mammography can help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer among women ages 40 to 74, especially for those over age 50.What are the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) recommendations for screening mammograms?Women age 40 and older should have mammograms every one to two years. Women who are at higher than average risk of breast cancer should talk with their health-care providers about whether to have mammograms before age 40 and how often to have them.What factors increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer?The strongest risk factor for breast cancer is age. A woman’s risk of developing this disease increases as she gets older. The risk of breast cancer, however, is not the same for all women in a given age group. Research has shown that women with the following risk factors have an increased chance of developing breast cancer:Personal history of breast cancerWomen who have had breast cancer are more likely to develop a second breast cancer.Family historyA woman’s chance of developing breast cancer increases if her mother, sister, and/or daughter have been diagnosed with the disease, especially if they were diagnosed before age 50. Having a close male blood relative with breast cancer also increases a woman’s risk of developing the disease.Genetic alterations (changes)Inherited changes in certain genes (for example, BRCA1, BRCA2, and others) increase the risk of breast cancer. These changes are estimated to account for no more than 10 percent of all breast cancers. However, women who carry certain changes in these genes have a much higher risk of breast cancer than women who do not carry these changes.Breast densityWomen who have a high percentage of dense breast tissue have a higher risk of breast cancer than women of similar age who have little or no dense tissue in their breasts. Some of this increase may reflect the “masking” effect of fibroglandular tissue on the ability to detect tumors on mammograms.Certain breast changes found on biopsyLooking at breast tissue under a microscope allows doctors to determine whether cancer or another type of breast change is present. Most breast changes are not cancer, but some may increase the risk of developing breast cancer.Reproductive and menstrual historyWomen who had their first menstrual period before age 12 or who went through menopause after age 55 are at increased risk of developing breast cancer. Women who had their first full-term pregnancy after age 30 or who have never had a full-term pregnancy are also at increased risk of breast cancer.Long-term use of menopausal hormone therapyWomen who use combined estrogen and progestin menopausal hormone therapy for more than five years have an increased chance of developing breast cancer.Radiation therapyWomen who had radiation therapy to the chest (including the breasts) before age 30 have an increased risk of developing breast cancer throughout their lives. This includes women treated for Hodgkin lymphoma. Studies show that the younger a woman was when she received treatment, the higher her risk of developing breast cancer later in life.AlcoholStudies indicate that the more alcohol a woman drinks, the greater her risk of breast cancer.DES (diethylstilbestrol)The drug DES was given to some pregnant women in the United States between 1940 and 1971 to prevent miscarriage. Women who took DES during pregnancy may have a slightly increased risk of breast cancer. The effects of DES exposure on breast cancer risk in their daughters are unclear and still under study.Body weightStudies have found that the chance of getting breast cancer after menopause is higher in women who are overweight or obese.Physical activity levelWomen who are physically inactive throughout life may have an increased risk of breast cancer. Being active may help reduce risk by preventing weight gain and obesity.Additional information about breast cancer and mammography is available from the National Institute of Cancer at the National Institutes of Health at www.Cancer.gov/cancertopics/screening/breast/mammogram.last_img read more

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DeGroot, Stinson capture Kootenay High School titles

first_imgBy Bruce Fuhr,The Nelson Daily SportsAndrea Stinson and Shawn DeGroot made it a clean sweep for L.V. Rogers at the Kootenay Cross Country Championships last week at the Camp Busk Nordic Ski Trails near Apex.The Grade 11 Stinson edged Emilie Mann of Fernie for the title by a slim 10-second margin to claim the Senior Girl’s Title.Stinson, who missed the West Kootenay meet, finished the 4.5-kilometer distance in a time of 16 minutes 28 seconds. “I wasn’t going to go into the race but Mr. (Jon) Francis (zone organizer) talked me into racing,” Stinson said.Tiara Livingston of Invermere’s David Thompson was third in a time of 17:05. Cassy Thummerer of Sparwood was fourth with LVR’s Kiraya Spencer fifth at 17:36.Darya Huser of Salmo finished sixth, Kia Wier of Mount Sentinel seventh, Jose Pinemauly of David Thompson eighth, Rylee Christenson of Creston’s Prince Charles and Madson Haynses David Thompson tenth.Top runners from J. V. Humphries in Kaslo, Taylor Wilson and Elllie Hewat, finished 13th and 14th, respectively.Meanwhile DeGroot had his feet flying through the Busk Trails, finishing the seven kilometers in a time of 22:44. Second was Nicolas Lambert of Golden, 23 seconds behind the Bomber runner.Lukas Smith of Kaslo was third at 23:36.Hunter Stanway of J.V. Humphries placed seventh with Julien Locke of Homelinks 11th. Top runner from Mount Sentinel was Roberto Miranda in 18th spot.The top 20 runners and three school teams qualify for the B.C. High School Cross Country Championships November 6th at Oak Bay in Victoria.J.V Humphries won the boy’s team title with David Thompson second and LVR third. David Thompson captured the girl’s team crown.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Hawks rebound to capture game seven thriller against Leafs

first_imgBy Bruce FuhrThe Nelson Daily SportsGavin Currie did his best to make his last game in the Green and White a memorable one.The Abbotsford native scored twice, but that was not enough as the Nelson Leafs fell 4-2 to the Beaver Valley Nitehawks in game seven of the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League playoff series Wednesday in Fruitvale.The Hawks now advance to the Murdoch Division final against the Castlegar Rebels. Game one goes Friday in the Sunflower City.“I thought we skated well, worked hard and got back to our game,” Beaver Valley assistant coach Jeremy Cominotto told The Nelson Daily from the winner’s dressing room following the game-seven victory.“We have a small rink so we like to get the puck deep, bang and finish checks which forces teams to turn the puck over and that made difference tonight.”Of course game seven would not have been played had the Hawks not allowed the Leafs to take game six with a 5-4 come-from-behind victory — something that left a bitter taste in the mouths of the players leading up to Wednesday’s game.“I know I couldn’t sleep at all last night,” Cominotto confessed. “But we took (Tuesday’s) loss as a great learning experience. We felt it was meant to be and the Hockey Gods wanted to see a game seven in a great series so it was pretty easy for our guys to get back on track and refocus for tonight.”And refocus they did.Beaver Valley, like the home squad had done for  most of the games in Fruitvale, jumped on the Leafs to grab an early 2-0 lead.  Tyler Collins and Colton Donselaar scored six minutes apart, the Collins marker coming on the power play, giving the Hawks early momentum.However, Currie, playing the entire series with an upper body injury after aggravating a shoulder that was originally injured New Year’s Eve, scored on a Nelson power lay with two minutes left in the opening frame.Brantley Schapansky restored the two-goal lead before Currie scored his second of the game midway through the second.In the third Nelson tried to find the equalizer before Ryon Sookro sealed the deal with an empty net marker.“We felt playing with the lead was huge because throughout the series the team that scored first seemed to win the game,” said Cominotto. “So it was key for us to get back home where we are comfortable and the lead.”The Hawks, finishing second in the Murdoch behind the regular season champion Rebels, now advance to meet Castlegar beginning Friday in the Sunflower City.“We expect another tough series,” Cominotto said. “Castlegar is a team that has four good lines. Of late they seem to be getting some good goaltending and is a well rounded team that works very hard.”Beaver Valley out shot Nelson 33-28 in the game with Michael Vlanich out dueling Marcus Beesley in the Nelson nets.BLUELINES: Late season acquisition Dustin Johnson, held off the score sheet in game seven, finished with the playoff scoring lead for Nelson with eight points. Gavin Currie was a point behind Johnson but led the team with five goals. Leaf captain Taylor O’Neil, playing his final game in the Green and White, was fourth behind Marcus Dahl with five points. O’Neil finished tied with Colton Schell. . . . Dallas Calvin, on fire early in the series, topped the Beaver Valley scoring with 11 points. Ryon Sookro was next with 10 points including five goals. Daniel Bishop had six goals for the Hawks. . . .Evan J. Moir, thought to be out for the remainder of the season after suffering an upper body injury during the last weekend of the season, played his second game for Nelson Wednesday.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Burrows, Canucks take major bite out of Bruins, edge Boston 3-2 in overtime

first_imgFourteen wins down, two to go.Alex Burrows took a major league bite out of the Boston Bruins, scoring 11 seconds into overtime to lift the Vancouver Canucks to a 3-2 victory in game two of the Stanley Cup Final Saturday at the Rogers Centre.Vancouver now leads the best-of-seven Cup series 2-0 with game three set for Monday in Boston. Game time is 5 p.m. PDT on CBC-TV.Burrows, sent into the Boston zone on a quick pass from Daniel Sedin, faked a shot before circling the goal and slipping the puck into the vacant net before falling to the ice in jubliation.“Danny (Sedin) made a great chip . . . I knew I had a step on (Zdeno Chara),” Burrows told CBC-TV after the game. “We did some pre-scouting on Tim Thomas and we know he likes to challenge.“I wanted to fake a shot, go around and shoot right away. (Thomas) kind of tried to trip me a little bit because he knew I had the angle. I was just able to just wrap it, it was tight angle and I was just lucky it went in.”The heroics of Burrows, finishing the game with three points, may not have happened had the NHL’s disciplinary committee decided to suspend the Canuck winger for his alleged bite of the finger of Patrice Bergeron during game one of the series.Instead the league determined there was not enough evidence to suspend the Canuck winger, even though NHL senior vice-president of hockey operations Mike Murphy spoke to Burrows.“Everybody who follows our team knows he’s a pretty big part of our team,” Vancouver head coach Alain Vigneault told the media during the post-game press conference when asked about the significance of Burrows being in the lineup.“He plays 5-on-5. He plays power play and kills penalties. He’s one of our go-to guys and again came up big . . .. I thought he was one of our better players and we need him to play that way.”Burrows opened the scoring in the first period, surprising Thomas with a quick shot during the late stages of a power play.Former Vancouver Giant Milan Lucic tied the game in the second before Kamloops native Mark Recchi game Boston its first lead of the series.Boston finished the period out shooting the Canucks 14-10.Vancouver took the play to the Bruins and at 9:37 of the period were rewarded when Burrows tapped the puck over to Daniel Sedin who snapped a shot past Thomas.The Canucks were given an emotional lift with the return of centre Manny Malhotra.Malhotra had been out of the lineup since suffering a severe eye injury March 16 against Colorado Avalanche.“It was great, obviously,” Burrows explained when asked about his teammate. “Manny has worked so hard to get back into shape and be in the lineup with us. “When his injury happened we were afraid for him and for his career too. Obviously it’s nice to see that he’s healthy, but competing with us, that’s even better.”CUP NOTES: The goal by Alex Burrows was the second fastest in NHL history. Twenty-five years ago, Montreal’s Brian Skrudland scored just nine seconds into OT in Calgary to give the Canadiens a 3-2 win in Game 2 of the Final. Skrudland broke the mark of 11 seconds set in 1975 by the New York Islanders’ J.P. Parise in the third and deciding game of their preliminary-round series against the Rangers. . . .Both teams spent the night in Vancouver after the game, choosing to fly to Boston Sunday . . . .The Bruins have a tough task ahead of them as the record for a team falling behind 0-2 in the series is 4-42. . . . Manny Malhotra., playing 7:26 in the game, was 6-1 in the face off circle in game two. . . .Vancouver finished the game out shooting Boston 33-30 thanks to an 11-5 advantage in the third period.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Cats survive Storm en route to Kootenay Volleyball title

first_img“Kudos to Selkirk for pushing us in a match that meant more to us (they had already qualified for provincial) than it might have them. I think we may have got caught being a little too confident.”The surprise of the tourney was the Salmo Falcons, which upset teams to grab the second Kootenay seed.After losing 3-0 to Sentinel, the Falcons shocked Fernie (3-1) 25-21, 25-13, 5-25, 26-24.The result dropped Fernie into fourth spot and a wild-card game against Vernon Christian.Nakusp and Kaslo’s J.V. Humphries finished tied for fifth with Grand Forks seventh, Elkford eighth, Sparwood ninth and Fernie Academy tenth.The Cats are currently ranked third in A girls provincial poll behind Kelowna Christian and Immaculata, also of Kelowna. The Mount Sentinel Wildcats tuned up for the provincial tournament later this month by capturing the Kootenay Zone Volleyball title with a three-set win over Selkirk Storm of Kimberley Saturday at the Selkirk College gymnasium in Castlegar.Mount Sentinel won the five-set match 25-19, 25-23, 25-20.The Cats now prepare to host the B.C. High School A Girl’s Volleyball Championships November 28-December 1 at Selkirk.”We were “average” — serving, typically our biggest weapon, was inconsistent all weekend,” explained Sentinel coach Joe Moreira.last_img read more

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Abrosimoff powers Mt. Sentinel past LVR Junior Bombers

first_imgFor the second time in four days the Mount Sentinel Wildcats beat up on their district rivals from L.V. Rogers on the basketball court.Aaron Abrosimoff scored a game high 18 points, including 10 in the opening quarter, to spark the Wildcats to a 44-32 West Kootenay High School Junior Boy’s Basketball victory Wednesday at the South Slocan School.Abrosimoff, who scored 11 points in a weekend victory during the Stanley Humphries Rockers Junior Boy’s Tournament, continued to torch the Bombers with his slick play in the post.Bombers had no answer as the host Cats held period leads of 16-5 and 26-9 at the half.At one stage in the second half Mount Sentinel led by as many as 24 points before the Junior Bombers applied a full-court press to cut the margin to eight points late in the game.Kie Miller had 14 for Mount Sentinel while Brandon Sookeroff added eight points. Replying for LVR were Jack Roberts with nine, Dyllan Dixon scored seven and Thomas Baxter, Josh Jolicoeur and Brock Dixon each had four.The Junior Bombers return to the court Saturday when the club hosts a one-day mini tournament.Grand Forks Wolves, Stanley Humphries of Castlegar and Boundary Central of Midway are the teams joining the Bombers in the tourney.Game begin at 11 a.m. with SHSS meeting Grand Forks.The Junior  Bombers take to the court for games at 12:30 p.m. and 2:15 p.m.Senior Bombers host Mount Baker WildThe LVR Senior Bombers, fresh off a tournament in Salmon Arm, play host to the Mount Baker Wild of Cranbrook in a two-game set beginning Friday at the Hangar.Friday’s game tips off at 7 p.m.Saturday, game time is set for 9:15 a.m.last_img read more

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CALIFORNIA-BRED GIMME DA LUTE SPRINGS SURPRISE IN GRADE III, $100,000 AFFIRMED STAKES AS BAFFERT & GARCIA TEAM FOR HALF LENGTH WIN; MIDNIGHT LUTE COLT GETS 1 1/16 MILES IN 1:41.40

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (June 7, 2015)–Bob Baffert’s Gimme Da Lute returned to Santa Anita and responded with a half length upset win in Sunday’s Grade III, $100,000 Affirmed Stakes. Ridden by Martin Garcia, the California-bred colt by Midnight Lute outdueled favored Prospect Park through the lane en route to getting a mile and a sixteenth in 1:41.40.A disappointing third as the favorite in the six furlong Chick Lang Stakes at Pimlico May 16, Gimme Da Lute seemed to appreciate a return to familiar environs.“He’s a tough little horse,” said Baffert assistant Mike Marlow. “I think coming back to his home track helped a lot and short fields never hurt either.”The second choice in a field of four three year olds at 7-2, Gimme Da Lute paid $9.20 and $3.20 (no show wagering).Owned by his breeders, Mike Pegram Karl Watson and Paul Weitman, all three of Gimme Da Lute’s wins have come at The Great Race Place. His overall mark now stands at 6-3-1-2 and with the winner’s share of $60,000, he improved his earnings to $247,560.Idle since running fourth in the Grade I Santa Anita Derby April 4, Prospect Park appeared to be traveling comfortably throughout under Kent Desormeaux and was never more than 2 ½ lengths off the pace, which was set to the top of the lane by longshot Om. Off as the 3-5 favorite, Prospect Park paid $2.20 to place.“He felt great,” said Desormeaux, who has ridden the Pamela and Martin Wygod homebred to a pair of victories in his last four starts. “He had good energy. He just needed one!”Ridden by Fernando Perez, Om came off a gate to wire turf allowance win on May 10 and tired to finish third, 2 ½ lengths behind Prospect Park.Fractions on the race were 23.54, 46.51, 1:10.57 and 1:35.04.Racing resumes at Santa Anita on Thursday, with first post time at 1 p.m. Admission gates open at 11 a.m. –30–last_img read more

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