Anglican mission agency leaders recommit to collaboration

first_imgAnglican mission agency leaders recommit to collaboration Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Communion This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls By ACNS staff and Janice PricePosted Mar 19, 2013 Submit a Job Listing Tags [Anglican Communion News Service] Chief executives from 10 leading Anglican mission agencies this week recommitted to work together “in joint action and reflection within the framework of the Five Marks of Mission.”Partnership for World Mission agency leaders gathered for their annual residential meeting at the home of the Church Army, the Wilson Carlile Centre, in Sheffield March 13-14.They represented Church Mission Society, Us, SPCK, Intercontinental Church society, Churches Ministry Among Jewish People, Church Army, Church Pastoral Aid Society, Mothers’ Union, Mission to Seafarers and Crosslinks.Several new chief executives were welcomed to the meeting. Philip Mounstephen of CMS, Andrew Wright of Mission to Seafarers and Richard Bromley of Intercontinental Church Society were all attending their first meeting and reflected afterwards that all 10 full-member societies represented a vast range of work concerned with mission at home and internationally.“As a new CEO it was enormously encouraging to be part of such a gathering where we can all bring our distinctiveness and work in partnership,” said Janette O’Neill, CEO of Us. “We are part of the church not just alongside it and we all want to play our part in discerning God’s mission in the world.”The meeting reflected on the Covenant of Common Mission, which was signed by all 10 chief executives and the archbishop of Canterbury in 2003. It described a commitment to work together in joint action and reflection within the framework of the Five Marks of Mission. All of the chief executives reaffirmed their commitment to the 2003 Covenant of Common Mission a decade on.Just a week before the historic enthronement of the new archbishop of Canterbury, all of the chief executives committed themselves to pray for and work with Archbishop Justin Welby in his future ministry. Mark Russell, CEO of Church Army, said, “As leaders of the mission agencies we will be praying for Archbishop Justin and we look forward to meeting him and sharing with him now and in the future and together keeping mission at the heart of the church.”Looking forward to the 2013 Partnership for World Mission Conference, the chief executives agreed that a focus on mission as both local and global should form the heart of the gathering with a special focus on the changing shape of mission in Europe.Partnership for World Mission comprises the 10 full-member mission agencies together with 21 associate member agencies and the diocesan companion links. It provides a platform for sharing on all aspects of world mission and a link between the Church of England’s General Synod and the mission agencies.— Janice Price is Partnership for World Mission coordinator. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 last_img read more

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Episcopal priest-curator hopes to build peace through filmmaking

first_img Rector Washington, DC By Pat McCaughanPosted Dec 16, 2014 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Canon Paul-Gordon Chandler hopes his upcoming film, “Ports of Call,” a “passionate interfaith love story,” will help foster understandings between East and West.The Rev. Paul-Gordon ChandlerBut he hesitates to consider it a religious-themed movie because “I’m somewhat of a skeptic looking at religious films, as in the Middle East and the culture I grew up in, you don’t really separate one from the other. It’s all interwoven, a single thread,” said Chandler, former rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Cairo, Egypt.For example, he said, if the new movie “Exodus: Gods and Kings” is shown in the Middle East, “no one thinks that it’s a religious film. It’s simply a story related to the Middle East, whether it’s true or not.”Chandler is the founder and curator of the Caravan interfaith arts exhibition, a nonprofit movement founded in Cairo that since March 2014 has been based in Chicago.Washington National Cathedral and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York recently showcased the Caravan exhibition, “AMEN: A Prayer for the World.” Chandler co-curated the show with Egyptian artist Reda Abdel Rahman. It included a showing of 30 Egyptian artists with Muslim and Christian backgrounds and 18 Western artists with Jewish and Christian backgrounds.Similarly, “Ports of Call,” expected to be released in the spring of 2016, aims to deepen understanding between faiths. It is based on the 1996 novel by Lebanese French author and Académie Française member Amin Maalouf and was nominated for a Nobel Prize for Literature.The story of two ill-fated lovers who meet in Paris during World War II and who are ultimately torn apart by the 1948 Arab-Israeli war will be produced by Ron Senkowski (“Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet,” “Decoding Annie Parker”) and Samira Kawas through their Dubai/L.A.-based Symply Entertainment. Chandler, who initially obtained the rights from Maalouf, is a co-producer.“It’s quite a story,” Chandler told ENS recently from Chicago. “In some ways, the film is a microcosm of the Middle East but it also links to the West and it addresses East-West issues …  it’s got war, tragedy, love, conflict.”“It involves the story of a Lebanese Muslim man of Turkish origin whose mother was Armenian Christian who falls in love during the French resistance in France while studying there, with a young Jewish woman,” so it involves all three Abrahamic faiths, Chandler said.Being a film industry novice didn’t faze Chandler, who grew up in Senegal, the son of missionaries, and “always observed this tension, the divide that exists between the two faiths and cultures, especially between the cultures of the Middle East and the West.”“My father was the pastor of the international church, with services in English and French, in Dakar, the capital city,” he recalled.Drawn to The Episcopal Church while in college, he began to realize that the arts can “bridge creeds and cultures in the East and West” while serving as St. John’s rector in Cairo, he told ENS.Danis Tanovic, who won the 2002 Foreign Language Oscar for “No Man’s Land,” as well as the Cannes 2001 screenplay prize for the film, is directing “Ports of Call.”“The film is about impossible love,” said Senkowski, Symply Entertainment CEO, in an email to ENS about “Ports of Call.” “Love without boundaries. Can two people who are in love survive in a world that is filled with conflict and war dedicated toward destroying people who are of other faiths? Today’s world is filled with blindness toward others.“Today it is neighborhood versus neighborhood, family against family, tribe against tribe. Lines on a map are dividing people as a result of arbitrary, or at least poorly conceived demarcations. These divisions are disrupting and in fact dominating generations of lives. Love thy neighbor is a notion that has been forgotten.”The film hopes to “inspire people to look beyond faith as a defining characteristic upon which to base relationships,” he said.Chandler said the film intends to encourage understanding and respect for one another and to help “overcome the all-too traditional prejudices toward the other” as well as addressing the critical issues of peace-building … “in some ways like an ‘English Patient,’ but with a deeper kind of purpose within it.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal priest-curator hopes to build peace through filmmaking The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

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Marriage task force calls for gender-neutral language in marriage canon

first_imgMarriage task force calls for gender-neutral language in marriage canon Proposed change would allow clergy to solemnize same-sex unions By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 4, 2015 February 14, 2015 at 12:16 am Those who worship texts instead of God will always do so and will never be persuaded from the certainity of their reading into it what they are determined to find there. Scripture, aka the Bible, aka Jesus’s own words (as claimed by those who composed the Gospels), have been used variously to justify racism, misogyny, discrimination against red-heads (yes, people with red hair). left-handed persons, the prohibition of inter-racial marriage, slavery, and slaughter of Jews and other non-Christians. Of course, for most of the text-literalists of today are fond of claiming that ‘this is different.’ For you test literalists, then, note that neither God in genesis nor God incarnate, Jesus, in the gospels is presented as using the word translated to English as ‘marriage.’ By the way, you do know, right? that the Bible wasn’t written in English? that what you’re reading is a thoroughly human and subjectively chosen translation of Hebrew, Greek, and Aramaic texts, don’t you? You know, don’t you, that you are putting your faith in translations determined by the thoroughly human choices of thoroughly human beings? This is not faith in God. This is idolatry. To admit this will deprive the literalists of their comfortable certitude and require to think for themselves, for a change. They will never willingly pay these costs. Their God is made of ink and paper. I’m happy to let them have it. Featured Jobs & Calls Doug Desper says: February 18, 2015 at 1:42 pm Good post. As I mentioned, I am torn. I will say this, I’ve heard nothing from any of the Episcopal churches I’ve been to that in any way at all sounded anti-Christ. Quite the contrary. I have been in plenty of evangelical churches growing up where attacks on other Christian groups and other people in particular was quite the norm, often with shouts of AMEN. So, we’re either a church that believes Christ loves all or we are people that try to turn God into our image. Peace. Doug Desper says: Comments are closed. Lisa Fox says: Doug Desper says: February 11, 2015 at 11:07 pm As God is my witness the hypocrisy of my progressive brothers and sisters never ceases to amaze me. Is it really any surprise that even Episcopal priests like the two Doug Desper mentions are afraid to say openly they agree with the meaning of traditional marriage for fear of being labled bigots? That their careers could literally be ended because of such views is truly pathetic. I totally agree with Jason Matthews, progressive Episcopalians truly do speak out of both sides of their mouths. A perfect example of that is the earlier letter by Cynthia Katsarelis. Cynthia rails about how unchristian it is to be judgmental toward people like her and her partner because they chose to marry. And yet in that very same letter she puts people who differ with her on this issue in the same realm of immorality as slave holders, witch burners and anti-Semites. Maybe it’s just me but that sounds about as judgmental as it gets! You say no one on earth is qualified to be judgmental about your marriage, yet you apparently consider yourself perfectly qualified to be judgmental of people who consider it wrong. And by the way Cynthia, I will make a deal with you – don’t put quotation marks on words such as traditional values, traditional religion, or conservative in regards to people like me and I won’t put quotation marks on the word marriage in regards to you and your partner. You said in TEC we use reason (I will use a lower case r), I am going to assume you were referring to progressive Episcopalians. Are you saying that no one can claim to be using reason unless they arrive at the same conclusions you and other progressives arrive at? I am going to leave Cynthia and all other progressive Episcopalians with this: God loves all of us equally, conservative as well as progressive. And neither side should think they are spiritually, morally or intellectually superior to the other on this issue or any other issue for that matter. I certainly try to follow the concept of love thy neighbor that Cynthia mentions, but until progressives in this denomination stop looking at fellow conservative parishioners that disagree with them on issues, with such utter contempt, then someday soon all those signs that say The Episcopal Church Welcomes You will be replaced by signs that say The Episcopal Church Welcomes You UNLESS: You’re against same sex marriage, You question climate change, You’re anti-choice, You believe in the literal interpretation of the Bible, You question evolution, You believe illegal aliens should be kept from crossing the border, you question gun control, You belong to the demonic republican party, You embrace capitalism etc etc. You get my point. I wish everyone a happy Ash Wednesday and an equally happy Lent. Submit an Event Listing Tags Rector Collierville, TN Richard McClellan says: Submit a Press Release February 5, 2015 at 12:54 pm Hmmm… I don’t think your application is germane about marriage Donald.In Matthew 19 Jesus didn’t liberalize to the Greek, Roman, or pagan understandings of marriage, just to “include everybody”. He missed the golden opportunity if that’s what it’s all about. He returned the listener to Genesis 2 to understand God’s design for marriage:4 “Haven’t you read,” he replied, “that at the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female,’5 and said, ‘For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’? 6 So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”Jesus had a whole history of aberrations of “marriage” to look back on including polygamy and other guises and had the golden opportunity to make marriage into something “new”, but he instead returned the listener to Genesis for “how to do marriage”. So, that implies that there is design and a value much greater than hospitality, generosity, or perceived notions of fairness.The reliance on “Reason” to make marriage what Jesus himself didn’t make it defies…well reason. We can make anything seem reasonable to ourselves and that should scare us.I have no doubt that General Convention will be ruled more by what looks fair than by the plain words of Christ. Doctrine by vote between lunch and the open cash bar.By all means, let’s just continue to irritate the pews by debating something that should be settled by the plain word of Christ himself. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK February 7, 2015 at 11:05 am The question Lisa: By what authority are you making marriage into what Christ Himself did not? Where is there any ambiguity in Matthew 19 or Genesis 2? February 4, 2015 at 7:05 pm Lord Jesus Christ never broke the law as many think. He interpreted meaning of God’s law only, preserving its sanctity for benefit of human spirituality. Sabbath day is a holy day, a day of rest as God rested on 7th day, Christ interpreted saving a child from a well in Sabbath day does not break sanctity of Sabbath day rather improve it by saving a life. Jesus told us evil spirit comes from inside of our spirit not from dirty hand that Israelis complained to Jesus for His disciples. God commanded to kill adulterer by stone throw, Jesus told Israelis mob to kill the prostitute woman by someone who committed no sins.And again He advised the woman not to commit any more sins according to laws of God. Ten Commandments were given to make us holy, inclusive for all His children. Inclusion of gentiles like us into God’s children was nothing new to God, He had plan from the beginning. By one man’s sin (Adam) we were separated from God but again by one man’s (Jesus Christ) sacrifice we were brought close to God as children of God. Definition of sins, according to eyes of God has never been changed since creation. God knows our heart, mind, body and souls and laws are given to save our souls, not to destroy it. Jesus fulfilled the laws only. Any changes should be in consistence to God’s law of saving souls, for which Jesus paid the price at the CROSS. February 4, 2015 at 6:04 pm Our Church continues to bend to the winds of Political correctness. So much that at times , it really stands tall for nothing.Give a “traditional couple” the choice of whether gender specific language is used or the time honored traditional language which may actually have a special meaning to the couple. Why make everything so homogenous? Is it marriage? Is it still a sacrament ? Do we have sacraments? Watering everything down won’t save the church and thank God 90 % of marries are hetero. Why step on the many to please a few? Give the traditional couple something they can use. Comments (37) February 5, 2015 at 12:13 pm If the church is going to allow same-sex marriage (which I believe it should), then the only way to address the legalistic structure behind it is through gender-neutral language in the canons. It’s not semantically possible to recognize these equally worthy marriages while maintaining language in the canons that specifically excludes them.Mixed-gender couples can still select the rite and wording for their marriage ceremony that has meaning for them. The fact that others can do the same does not “water down” their marriage or the sacrament as a whole.For those who would still wish to specifically exclude others from marriage, the church has devoted much thought, prayer and discussion to this matter, and has not reached the same conclusions that you, personally, have reached. Whenever an institution weighs the opinions and positions of its constituents and comes to a conclusion, there will always be those were were not proponents of that conclusion. These days, it’s inevitable that the term “political correctness” will be bandied about. Those who lost the debate may want believe that the church is therefore guilty of some offense, and “political correctness” is a readily available terminology. But the church is not guilty of this or any other wrong-doing – you simply did not get your way on this matter. February 5, 2015 at 3:56 pm The public’s (1) rapid acceptance of homosexuality, (2) slow rejection of procreation as the essence of marriage, (3) support for civil regulation of marriage, and (4) rejection of nomistic religion have have combined faster than the usual parties can update their thinking. Those who see (1) and only (1) in this report have the shrillest voices today, either for it or against it, but in the long run all of these deep forces will have to be considered carefully and both jointly and severally. After the children have gone to bed, the adults will talk, but it may be a long time before they know what to say. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ February 12, 2015 at 8:11 pm Christianity: In this world but not of this world. Rector Albany, NY Doug Desper says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Same-Sex Marriage Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska February 8, 2015 at 8:35 pm If “the texts of scripture were written by human beings rather [than] by God,” why do you waste time going to church on Sunday? If we’re free to “interpret” the Bible “in light of [our] own times and experiences with Christ Jesus,” than “Christ Jesus” is nothing more than pseudo-theological jargon and the Christian religion is worthless. Bowman Walton says: February 9, 2015 at 11:37 am As a libertarian, I absolutely believe that consenting adults should be able to get married. Right or wrong, my sense of morality nor any church’s sense of morality should not be the law of the land. That said, this report doesn’t change my mind that Christian marriage is between one man and one woman. Sadly, many “progressive” Episcopalians speak out of different sides of their mouth. Many Episcopalians are all too happy to “churchify” secular progressive politics and use the force of government to ram their beliefs down the throats of others (taxes, gun control, social welfare, etc.) and declare it the Gospel. Episcopalians are all too happy to make their sense of morality the law of the land, it’s hypocrisy folks. Frankly, many “progressive” Episcopalians behave no better or no different than the conservative “fundamentalists” that they love to vilify. I don’t want to get off topic, but I have been called vile things by so-called “inclusive” Episcopalians for supporting gun rights. In no way are all who call themselves “inclusive” guilty of this, but I’ve found that those that have to parade around about being “inclusive” are generally some of the most close-minded people you will find. February 4, 2015 at 11:36 pm Great article on the work of the Task Force, Mary Frances. Geoff McLarney says: Terry Francis says: Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ann Fontaine says: James Stoctkon says: John Fitzgerald says: February 4, 2015 at 3:03 pm “Noting the rapidly changing social and legal landscape of marriage, the Task Force on the Study of Marriage says in its report that “this time of flux bears continuing discernment and attention by our Church.”How sad and pathetic. But, I know that I am a minority in this church. This Resolution will pass with an overwhelming majority, I suspect. I will pray daily that the EpiscopalChurch repents (“turns around”) from this error. Ultimately God will judge the correctess of this action, not I.I always thought that the Church has been and should be a counter culture, a counter-weight to the whims of the prevailing culture . “Be not conformed…but be ye transformed” is the cry of Scripture, specifically St. Paul. By going along with the culture on this very serious issue, the Task Force abuses Scripture, compromises the catholic church’s stand,a stand not shared incidentally by Roman Catholic Church, Mormans, Baptists, Muslims, orthodox Jews and the vast majority of the world’s religions.Sigh….. Jean de LaVallette says: Same-Sex Blessings, Rich Basta says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Christopher Johnson says: Jim Stockton says: Jason Matthews says: General Convention, Miguel Rosada says: February 10, 2015 at 1:39 pm There is no love in calling something what it is not! Civil society aside, Christian marriage as defined by Jesus himself, who seemed to have not mentioned nor condemned same gender relationships is quite clear in the gospels. Matthew 19: 4 “…Haven’t you read…that at the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female,’ and said, ‘For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’? No Task Force report, appeals to emotion, GC resolutions, our desire to be nice or charitable can change that! Christian marriage as presupposed by Jesus includes biological difference, complementarity of genders, a husband and a wife…! Same gender relationships, even holy, loving ones, are biologically different, ordered differently! There is not a lot of discernment that needs to be done to see this clearly…it is written in creation ! We do ourselves and all couples a disservice by pretending otherwise. I applaud our society’s progress in equal access to civil marriage, our Church’s pastoral provision for those same gender couples who want a blessing of their union, but to change the language of the marriage canon there is no justification! It seems a poor attempt to blurr what Christ made clear and pretend as if biology never mattered in the sacrament of Holy Matrimony ! I expect more people will flee our parishes over it! Lord have mercy on us all! Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Doug Desper says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET June 3, 2015 at 2:31 pm I have never quite understood why same-sex marriage should be a position associated with “progressives” (which is itself a peculiar label to use in a theological context). Surely it is a “conservative” position to maintain marriage as the exclusively appropriate context for a conjugal relationship between Christians. In that light, if same-sex couples do _not_ marry, then they are living in sin!I don’t entirely follow your laundry list at the end. Capitalism, armed violence, and oppression of the “stranger within the gates” are unacceptable to Christians _because_ they defy the “plain meaning of Scripture”. If “you believe illegal aliens should be kept from crossing the border, you question gun control, You embrace capitalism,” them it follows you do not “believe in the [sic] literal interpretation of the Bible.” Lisa Fox says: F.W.Atkins says: February 5, 2015 at 4:20 pm The main concern that some of us have is that the adults in the room talk from the perspective of a Church that values Scripture-Tradition-and Reason above the culture’s noise and Caesar’s whims, and that when Christ Himself has spoken clearly on a matter that the Church does not pull out the voting cards to see “what fits”. February 13, 2015 at 1:41 pm Simply and perfectly put….my heart breaks because I love our church and see that it has lost its way. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL February 11, 2015 at 12:21 pm Miguel, Jason, Julian, Bowman, Prof John, and many others —After this thread started and heated up a bit I was contacted by a few people. Two were priests. The priests are afraid of publicly agreeing with the traditional meaning of marriage as is being stated here because they will get “marked” as bigots, homophobes, and all the other tags used to squash thoughtful, reasoned exchange of views. There is fear of career-ending stands made from the perspective of the Scriptural and catholic meaning of marriage. Neither believe that they will remain able to follow their consciences and decline a same gender wedding (based on previous temporary seasons for dissent on issues that ended up being retracted). Ain’t that a kicker? I guess that it’s up to the laity to do the standing. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Father Mike Waverly-Shank says: February 16, 2015 at 11:38 am Jesus said He did not come to change the law but to fulfill it. And every and I mean every reference to marriage in the Bible is gender specific – male and female. And that for me settles the question! February 4, 2015 at 4:43 pm Jesus’ teachings were often challenging to the established religious norms of his day. Jesus broke the rules in order to fulfill a greater law and purpose. Always a way to bring more people into the embrace of God’s love. February 17, 2015 at 11:37 pm I want to know more about the pagan roots of what we so boldly proclaim as “Godly marriage”. Is it true that wedding rings were started by pagan Romans? Defenders of DOMA sadly tried to push THEIR version of God into the civil courts and when the Supreme Court called them on it, their house of cards has crumbled. Conservative Christians can rant about separation of church and state unless it’s their version of Christianity. We are all God’s madmen in some way, shape, fashion or form. Personally, I am torn between TEC or attending/joining one of the “continuing” Anglican churches. Both hurl mud, both are stuffy, yet TEC in my area is much closer than the “traditional” Anglican church. Can we not get along? Kudos on the Bible idolatry example. Scary. Richard D Thorn says: February 18, 2015 at 9:16 am Richard: Laying aside all of the mistakes, manipulations, and “getting it wrong” about marriage Jesus returned listeners’ attention to Genesis 2. Nothing else touched or invented by humanity before that day or since that day matters. He even reminds us that God allowed divorce only because our hearts were sinful. That does not detract from the return that Christ makes to the original purpose and design for marriage. The question remains whether or not the words of Christ or private revelations blamed on the Holy Spirit matter more as authoritative. If the latter, then walk out during the Gospel reading this week, because it’s all a lie. C.S. Lewis boiled it down in sum to say that Jesus is either a lunatic or the Son of God. He can’t be both. Therefore, his words either matter or don’t. Buffet-bouncing through His words in the Gospels won’t do. We’re either a Church that believes that the Holy Scriptures contain all things necessary for salvation or we are Unitarians playing at church in fancy dress. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Richard McClellan says: February 8, 2015 at 7:50 pm Doug, the ambiguity is present by virtue of the fact that the texts of scripture were written by human beings rather by God. More , it is but certain that they were written by men exclusively. This is why we Episcopalians do not worship the Bible. We worship the God with whom the authors of the various books of our bible had inspirirational relationships. But just as the New Testament authors were entrusted by God to use the sacred gift of thoughtful reflection to interpret their ancient scriptures in light of their own times and experiences with Christ Jesus, so also God trusts us and expects us to do the same. To approach the text of scripture as a rule book is simply pharisaical; there’s nothing Christlike about that. To approach scripture as though it is God is simply superstious and lazy. Again, there’s nothing in this approach that is faithful to Jesus or to the example that he left us. However, I have no illusion that you are likely to find any of this persuasive. God’s blessings to you and go in peace. Prof. John Switzer says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Julian Malakar says: Human Sexuality, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Donald B Hill says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Lisa Fox says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Doug Desper says: [Episcopal News Service] The A050 Task Force on the Study of Marriage is recommending that the 2015 meeting of General Convention authorize Episcopal Church clergy to officiate at same-sex marriages.The task force proposes the change in its just-released Blue Book report by way of a resolution (numbered A036) that would revise Canon I.18 titled “Of the Solemnization of Holy Matrimony” (page 58 of The Episcopal Church’s canons here).The revision removes, among many edits, the language of I.18.2(b) that requires couples to “understand that Holy Matrimony is a physical and spiritual union of a man and a woman.” Removing that and other gender-specific language from the canon, the report says, addresses the mandate in the group’s enabling resolution that it “address the pastoral need for priests to officiate at a civil marriage of a same-sex couple in states that authorize such.”Section 3 of Canon 18 would be rewritten to, in part, remove the requirement that the couple sign a declaration stating they “solemnly declare that we hold marriage to be a lifelong union of husband and wife as it is set forth in the Book of Common Prayer.”The revision would recast the requirement in the canon’s first section that clergy conform to both “the laws of the state” and “the laws of this Church” about marriage. The rewritten portion of that section would require that clergy conform to “the laws of the State governing the creation of the civil status of marriage, and also to these canons concerning the solemnization of marriage.”Canon I.18 contains the majority of the rules in the church’s canons about clergy officiating at marriage. Canon I.19 governs the “preservation of marriage, dissolution of marriage, and remarriage” and as such refers to “husband” and “wife” in its third section. The Book of Common Prayer, which Article X of the church’s constitution authorizes, refers to marriage on page 422 as Christian marriage being “a solemn and public covenant between a man and a woman in the presence of God.” It uses gender-specific language throughout “The Celebration and Blessing of a Marriage,” “The Blessing of a Civil Marriage” and “An Order for Marriage” rites, as well as in its “Additional Directions” section.The task force says in its report that its revision of Canon I.18 makes the canon “focused on the actual vows made in The Book of Common Prayer marriage rite, rather than on the purposes of marriage in general,” which it adds are stated “in literally creedal form.”The clergy’s discretion to decline to solemnize any marriage is preserved and extended to include the choice to decline offering a blessing on a marriage, the task force said.The 122-page report, the majority of which includes resources the task force developed for the study of marriage and essays on various issues concerning marriage, is available in English here and in Spanish here.The task force was formed in response to a call (via Resolution A050) from the 77th General Convention in July 2012 for a group of “theologians, liturgists, pastors and educators to identify and explore biblical, theological, historical, liturgical and canonical dimensions of marriage.”That same meeting of convention authorized provisional use of a rite to bless same-sex relationships. Use of that rite, Liturgical Resources I: I Will Bless You and You Will Be A Blessing, is due to be reviewed by General Convention in 2015.Noting the rapidly changing social and legal landscape of marriage, the Task Force on the Study of Marriage says in its report that “this time of flux bears continuing discernment and attention by our Church.”Thus the group will ask convention to consider Resolution A037 to continue the task force’s work into the 2016-2018 triennium as a way to “explore further those contemporary trends and norms” the current group has identified.Those trends and norms, the group’s report says, include “those who choose to remain single; unmarried persons in intimate relationships; couples who cohabitate either in preparation for, or as an alternative to, marriage; couples who desire a blessing from the Church but not marriage; parenting by single and/or unmarried persons; differing forms of family and household such as those including same-sex parenting, adoption, and racial diversity; and differences in marriage patterns between ethnic and racial groups, and between provinces inside and outside the United States.”While doing its work this triennium, “the Task Force became highly aware of a growing contemporary reality in society and the Church that is redefining what many mean by ‘family’ or ‘household,’” the group says in its report, adding that “this changing reality is felt in our congregations.”Marriage “as a normative way of life” is being challenged, yet the group says it “did not have the time or resources to fully address this reality.”“More broadly, our Church has done very little to respond to it,” the task force says.The task force’s two resolutions, as well as other expected proposed resolutions on marriage, will be handled by a special legislative Committee on Marriage when the General Convention next meets June 25-July 3 in Salt Lake City.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, said in July that they would appoint the committee “to ensure that the work of the Task Force on Marriage and resolutions related to the rapidly shifting contexts of civil marriage in the United States and in several other parts of the world can be given appropriate consideration.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs February 4, 2015 at 7:57 pm I have been supportive of the blessing of same-sex unions, but I see an entirely new initiative in this proposal. Marriage is being redefined, and honestly, I do not see this as a necessary step to gender equality. In the long run, I expect that this redefinition will be problematic for the church. In addition, this continued rapid advancement leftward will leave our pews even more empty than they already are. We are not a church that values dissident voices when those voices are conservative. Marriage Equality, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem February 14, 2015 at 6:16 am Jim, try to put away your sarcasm for a moment. (For you I know that may be hard to do, but give it your best shot!) Yes Jim, I am well aware that the Bible wasn’t originally written in English. Yes Jim, I know all about the original Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek texts. And your point is? I guess by your reasoning we shouldn’t pay any attention at all to the book because it has now all been written in English. I do not “worship” the Bible Jim, I worship Who it tells about. I am putting my faith in translations written by yes, “thoroughly” human beings but they were also godly human beings who tried to translate these sacred texts as accurately as possible. Maybe they didn’t get it 100% right, but close enough. As for your assumption that there is literally no mention of the word that would eventually be translated in English as marriage mentioned in either the Old or New Testaments, again what is your point? The concept of marriage is mentioned everywhere in the Bible; Genesis2:18, Genesis2:24, Hebrews13:4, St Matthew19:4-5, St Matthew19:1-30, St John2:11, shall I go on Jim? I don’t mind engaging in an honest debate but people like yourself seem to take pleasure in ridiculing, and being condescending to those who have a different point of view. Let me assure you that I do think for myself, even if, God forbid, my conclusions run counter to yours. You said that the God of people who have a more literal interpretation of the Bible is a God made up of ink and paper. Your God is made up of what you perceive to be your superior intellect and I will happily leave you to that. Terry Francis says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Doug Desper says: June 3, 2015 at 2:24 pm Christ did not “define” any such thing as “Christian marriage.” That is an anachronism not to be found in the Bible. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC February 5, 2015 at 1:14 pm Prof. Switzer: This news comes the same week that our beloved Episcopal Church LOST in South Carolina court to prevent the dissenting diocese of South Carolina from retaining its property as it left TEC. The reason that these people (among so many others) have dissented, and even left, is due to the very mindset shown by re imagining Christian marriage; something that will more than likely be enacted at General Convention. Such actions by General Convention are making the case that critical decisions are being made that cannot be reconciled with the Holy Scripture, nor by the Church catholic. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Mary Martha Quinn says: Doug Desper says: February 4, 2015 at 10:56 pm Thank you, Cynthia Katsarelia. I would only add that not only is “History… not going to look kindly on the excluders;” but God is unlikely to do so either. “Traditional Conservatives” should also remember that “it is what comes out of the mouth that defiles!” Rector Shreveport, LA February 4, 2015 at 8:56 pm My partner of 23 years and I got married. Really married, legally and using the beautiful I Will Bless You and You Will be a Blessing liturgy.Our relationship has always been sacramental, an inward Grace that was finally expressed outwardly a few weeks ago. We were very surprised that after 23 years, that the vows before God, supported robustly by our fellow parishioners, and legal in my state could have such a beautiful and loving impact, and yet it did.No one on earth is qualified to be judgmental about our marriage. It is between me and my partner and God and our loving parish. If you think you have the right to withhold the outward expression of God’s Grace in the church, please go back to the NT and read where Jesus says don’t judge. Read how he always stands for the oppressed against the status quo, especially when the status quo was using the Law to exclude others. “Conservatives” would use the law to exclude LGBT people in the very same way the law was used to support slavery, anti-semitism, and the burning of witches. Sadly, “traditional” values include those awful things. And thus in TEC we also use Reason. We, my LGBT sisters and brothers, are not “positions” from which it is OK to just dissent, as if it were about smaller or bigger government. The fruits of the exclusive position include homeless LGBT teens who’ve been cast out of their “traditional religious” homes, and many of them are subjected to sexual abuse on the streets. The fruits also include bullying, hate crimes, suicide, depression, etc. There are negative consequences as the fruits of the “traditional conservative” position. And that should give everyone pause. Why did God create us all? It wasn’t for hate and exclusion. History is not going to look kindly on the excluders. And I don’t see how that position is compatible with the commandment to “love your neighbor” – every last one of them on the planet. Rector Bath, NC Featured Events February 5, 2015 at 4:27 pm “….For those who would still wish to specifically exclude others from marriage, ..” John, I think that the problem a lot of us have is to know by what authority anyone has revised marriage to “include” what Christ Himself did not. A group of voters on the matter does not right doctrine make. That single council of the Church called General Convention must know that it may act to make what Christ did not, but then it cannot continue to claim to be a part of a catholic Church due to its aberration undertaken apart from the advice and wisdom of the rest of the Communion. February 6, 2015 at 9:06 pm Reading the responses of those opposed to this proposed change, I must ask, “Really? Did you actually read the report, or are you just reverting to your narrow, heterosexist understanding of the marriage covenant?” Please read the Task Force report. Marriage has long been a contractual construct regarding property (including the husband’s “owning” the wife) and not a sacramental one. As we did in creation and adoption of the 1979 BCP, I believe the Task Force has returned to First Principles. I applaud the work of the task force, and I hope GC will adopt the gist of their recommendations. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA February 5, 2015 at 10:25 am I’m wondering if we have the capacity to be genuine and honest about marriage and so to admit that it is was a pagan social covenant that was adapted by the ancient Hebrews from the various cultures from which they emerged to become a people, then a secular contract in which the Church had little interest until the 11th and 12th centuries. As any attorney should be able to confirm, the language used by this Church today for sealing the covenant of matrimony is, in many places, exactly the same as is used for the purchase of real estate. Marriage is a secular contract in which the Church has chosen to involve itself, and one that the State has chosen to recruit the Church to serve as its agent. There is no reason that the Church may not or should not define the covenant of marriage as it deems fit, regardless of the State’s definition of same. There is nothing legally to prevent or forbid the Church from sealing a covenant between two persons that the Church recognizes and honors, even if the State does not. The Church should not allow itself to be bound, restricted, or defined in its ministry by the State. The Church should not allow the State the de facto role of declaring the sanctity of a union. Determining a legal definition of a contract is the State’s or government’s business. Determining the Church’s definition is the Church’s business. There is no inherent link. The Church could, and I think it should, determine sacred union for ALL the Church without exception and irrespective of differing laws of States. The only distinction, then, would be whether or not the union would be recognized by State law; but this is a concern rightly to be addressed by the couple concerned. It is important only that the Church be forthright with the couple and with all concerned that the union will or will not be legally recognized by the State; but the Church should be clear and declarative that the State does not determine the union’s sanctity before God. Homophobes and xenophobes will not be changed in their opinions. So be it. May the Church, then, with the courage granted her by the inspiration of those saints in ages past who challenged brutality wed to scriptural justification under the guise of tradition, press forward with confidence that God indeed is Love. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cynthia Katsarelis says: Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Geoff McLarney says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Jim Stockton says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI February 6, 2015 at 9:10 pm Amen, my brother. I suspect those commenting negatively here haven’t bothered to study history or to read the Task Force report. You are exactly right. Press Release Service Bruce Marshall says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 6, 2015 at 9:09 pm God bless you, Cynthia Katsarelis, and your marriage.I hope the naysayers will actually read the report of the Task Force. The sacrament of marriage should be a holy covenant before God and our congregations, not the enforcement of a civil contract enforced by the State. I hope and trust that this change will enrich our church, as I am pleased to hear it has blessed your married life. Rector Martinsville, VA February 5, 2015 at 2:07 pm Notice that Jesus says ” God said” and quotes a piece of the narrative of Genesis 2, not a piece within quotation marks. That is, Jesus understood Genesis to be spoken by God, and that it is God, not church or state, who defines marriage. February 9, 2015 at 6:51 am I can think of nothing worse to say than that the words of Jesus Christ are not “Christ like”. Is this really where we are as a Church? I dread to think so. We are being asked to replace the Biblical witness and over 2,000 years of catholic faith with the private revelations of revisionist activists. Such views are predicating themselves on how erroneous and superstitious it is to believe in anything other than one’s own reasoned thoughts. If such becomes the case then God will not prosper this Church and we will continue to decline as the current trajectory so clearly indicates. Isn’t it interesting that the more faith and practice become revised and replaced that we increasingly think of how to survive as an institution; a subject being addressed separately at General Convention? I also find it interesting that as our Church assaults God’s 1st institution so clearly affirmed by Christ that we are grasping for how to go on with our own structures and institutions.last_img read more

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Video: Episcopal Church helps refugees resettle in France

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This article is part of an ongoing series exploring the response to the global refugee crisis by The Episcopal Church and its ecumenical and interfaith partners. Other articles in the series are available here.[Episcopal News Service] The following video about how The Episcopal Church is helping refugees escaping war and persecution to find new homes in France was first published in June 2013.Much of the story is still accurate more than 2 years later. However, since the video was published, Association d’Entraide aux Minorités d’Orient (Association to Support Eastern Minorities), set up to help the French government identify candidates eligible for asylum, has helped to resettle a further 1,300 refugees, bringing the total number to more than 2,600.Although the association, set up in 2007 by Bishop Pierre Whalon of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe and Iraqi businessman Elish Yako, has largely focused on Iraqi Christian refugees, in the past two years it has helped many Syrian minorities escaping persecution.The association often meets the refugees as they enter France and assists them with integration and administrative issues.Resources for education and responseThe most recent updates from Episcopal Relief & Development about its response to the refugee crisis, as well as ways to donate, are available here.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori’s statement on refugees as well as congregational and individual response suggestions are available here.Episcopal Migration Ministries, the refugee resettlement service of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, works with local resettlement partners, congregations, and individual volunteers, to welcome refugees to the United States from the world’s most war-torn places.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Video center_img Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Refugees Migration & Resettlement, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Video: Episcopal Church helps refugees resettle in France Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Matthew DaviesPosted Oct 22, 2015 Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

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Five new members welcomed to Episcopal Relief & Development Board…

first_img Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS People Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Posted Jan 4, 2016 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY [Episcopal Relief & Development press release] Episcopal Relief & Development welcomes five new members to its Board of Directors, effective January 1, 2016:Ms. Rosalie Ballentine of the Episcopal Diocese of the Virgin Islands;Ms. Sophie Hollingsworth of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington;The Rev. David C. Killeen of the Episcopal Diocese of Florida;Mr. John A. ‘Jock’ MacKinnon of the Episcopal Diocese of New York; andMs. Laura Ellen Muglia of the Episcopal Diocese of Olympia.“I welcome our five new board members with much gratitude and anticipation of the meaningful work we will do together,” said Neel Lane, Chair of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Board of Directors. “Each of our new members brings unique gifts and talents to the table, as we seek constantly to elevate the organization’s work and strengthen Episcopalians’ connection to this Church-wide ministry of global outreach.”Ms. Rosalie Ballentine is an attorney in private practice in the US Virgin Islands, formerly serving as Solicitor General and as Attorney General of the Virgin Islands. Ms. Ballentine has extensive experience in church governance, both in The Episcopal Church and in the Anglican Communion. In 2013, she succeeded fellow Episcopal Relief & Development board member Josephine Hicks as lay representative of The Episcopal Church to the Anglican Consultative Council.Ms. Sophie Hollingsworth is a Program Officer for the International Conservation Caucus Foundation. Currently working in international development on agriculture and environmental conservation, she has a background in International Relations with on-the-ground experience in Tanzania and Rwanda. She is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Roy A. Hunt Foundation, serving on the International Development Committee.The Rev. David C. Killeen is Rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Tallahassee, Florida, where he and the congregation created Visioning the Vineyard, a prayerful, grassroots, five-year plan for the future of St. John’s, resulting in congregational growth and vitality. In addition to strategic planning, Mr. Killeen also has deep experience in parish ministry and faith formation, helping children, youth and families learn how to live their faith through local and global outreach.Mr. John A. ‘Jock’ MacKinnon is a partner in the law firm of Sidley Austin LLP in New York. From 2002-2014, he served as a member of their Executive Committee and as co-chair of the global investment management practice. His expertise in financial auditing has made him a valuable member of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Audit Committee in his six years as an adviser. He has also traveled with the organization to visit programs in El Salvador and Ghana.Ms. Laura Ellen Muglia has focused the past decade of her life on furthering initiatives to end global poverty through investing in health and economic development. She was Co-Chair of theNetsforLife® Inspiration Fund, a Church-wide campaign to raise $5 million for Episcopal Relief & Development’s malaria prevention programs, and led the Episcopal Diocese of Olympia in raising $350,000 for the effort. As a consultant, she contributed to the formation of the Anglican Alliance, of which Episcopal Relief & Development is part.“I am grateful for the addition of these five new members as we embark on the visioning process for our next strategic plan,” said Rob Radtke, the organization’s President. “Their insight and expertise will provide critical guidance for Episcopal Relief & Development’s continual improvement as an agency and as a faithful ministry of The Episcopal Church.”New board members are nominated by the Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church and the Chair of the Board of Episcopal Relief & Development, in consultation with the Board’s Governance Committee. Candidates are then elected by the Board, and the election takes effect when ratified by the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church. Board members are invited to serve three-year terms, which may be renewed once.As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization operating under the General Convention of The Episcopal Church, Episcopal Relief & Development is governed by a 21-member Board of Directors that includes clergy and lay leaders from around the country. Previous Board Chair The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry transitioned to the role of Honorary Chair upon his installation as Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church on November 1, 2015; he is succeeded by current chair Neel Lane.For over 75 years, Episcopal Relief & Development has served as a compassionate response to human suffering in the world. The agency works with more than 3 million people in nearly 40 countries worldwide to overcome poverty, hunger and disease through multi-sector programs, using the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a framework. An independent 501(c)(3) organization, it works closely with Anglican Communion and ecumenical partners to help communities create long-term development strategies and rebuild after disasters. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Relief & Development, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Five new members welcomed to Episcopal Relief & Development Board of Directors In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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Historic western Cape church badly damaged in student protest arson…

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Africa, Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Anglican Communion News Service] A 130-year-old church in District Six at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology in Cape Town has been badly damaged in a suspected arson attack. The building was set alight the night of Sept. 27, during the latest in a long-running series of sometimes violent protests at the campus. The church’s undercroft and hall bore the brunt of the damage. The protests relate to the suspension of four students last month as a result of their involvement in demonstrations about student facilities and in-sourced workers. The protests have continued despite the university obtaining a temporary court order prohibiting students from unauthorized occupation of campus buildings.Read the entire article here. Rector Bath, NC center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Historic western Cape church badly damaged in student protest arson attack Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Communion Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Posted Sep 28, 2017 last_img read more

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RIP: Bishop George Edward Councell of Diocese of New Jersey

first_img Bishop Paisible NDACAYISABA says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME People Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Kathryn Macek says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Eric Williams says: May 23, 2018 at 5:01 pm Prayers for Bp. George and family. I met George when he served in the Diocese of Chicago and he was a good friend of my parish priest, Fr. Art Parker. George and Art were classmates at EDS. God’s peace and love. Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis May 23, 2018 at 10:15 pm RIP May 23, 2018 at 10:41 pm A wonderful man who will be greatly missed. Blessed to have known him. Prayers for all of his family. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Posted May 22, 2018 May 23, 2018 at 4:51 pm I met Bishop Councell when he was canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Western Massachusetts. I enjoyed his regular column (“By George!”) in the diocesan newspaper. My prayers are with his family and friends. May he rest in peace and rise in glory. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Donald Frye says: Submit a Job Listing [Episcopal News Service] The Rt. Rev.George Edward Councell, the 11th bishop of the Diocese of New Jersey, died May 21 hours after being transferred to hospice care, the diocese announced. He was 68.Councell served 10 years as bishop before retiring in 2013, five years after doctors diagnosed Parkinson’s disease.“I wanted to become a bishop to get closer to God, but with so many people here to look after, I thought, wow, I’ll really have to get closer to God to do this,” he said with a laugh in a 2013 interview with the The Times of Trenton. “But I feel that I have.”Councell died at about 6 p.m. May 21 at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in Hamilton.“Family and friends were with him. I had an opportunity to say prayers and anoint him, and said commendatory prayers with the family,” Bishop Chip Stokes said in a brief message to the diocese announcing Councell’s death. “Please pray for Ruth, their daughters Martha and Sarah, and hold the Councell family in your prayers.“May his soul and the souls of all the departed through the mercy of God rest in peace and rise in glory.”Councell, who received his Master of Divinity degree from Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was ordained as a priest in 1975 in the Diocese of Los Angeles and went on to serve as vicar of St. George’s Church in Riverside, California; canon to the ordinary of the Diocese of Western Massachusetts, and rector of Church of the Holy Spirit in Lake Forest Illinois, according an obituary by Planet Princeton.He also was a supporter of greater inclusion of gay Episcopalians in the life of the church.“It was very dear to me to keep everyone at the table, the Lord’s table, and not needlessly build these boundaries among one another,” he told The Times of Trenton in 2013. “The church isn’t the totally safe place I want it to be for gays and lesbians, but I think we’ve made it a safer place for them, and a place where they can come, and be seen as people who want the same things as all of us: to have a healthy, happy, strong, supportive family.” Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing John A. Baldwin says: Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Obituary, Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL May 23, 2018 at 4:52 pm I have very fond memories of George during my first year of seminary at EDS (1974-5) as a senior who was warm, gracious and welcoming to all of us first year seminarians. Later as Canon to the Ordinary in the Diocese of Western Massachusetts he was exceedingly kind to my father who was a priest in that diocese. George was an easy person to love, respect and admire. Tags Comments (5) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC RIP: Bishop George Edward Councell of Diocese of New Jersey Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

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Proving ownership of inherited property is a problem on St….

first_img Hurricane Irma, Tags Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virgin Islands Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC 2017 Hurricanes, Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church of England established St. John’s in Christiansted in 1760. Though the church didn’t suffer much damage during Hurricanes Irma and Maria, it’s in desperate need of restoration. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceEditor’s note: This is one in a series of stories on hurricane recovery in the Virgin Islands. Click here to read more and here for a photo gallery.[Episcopal News Service – St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands] It’s not uncommon in the Virgin Islands for homes to be handed down from one generation to another. It’s also not uncommon for a deceased person to have his or her name on the deed, which is a problem when it comes to applying for help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, as many people have found.Across St. Croix and the other islands, there are stories of people living in damaged houses without electricity – people ineligible for funds to repair their homes because they don’t “own” the property.“One of the difficulties is finding out who is the owner,” said Angelica Schuster, a member of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, which has assisted community members in assembling the paperwork needed to file FEMA applications.Gloria Euzebe, St. Peter’s senior warden, explains that some island residents are opening separate “in God we trust” accounts rather than pay insurance premiums. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFEMA used St. Peter’s parish hall, located in Christiansted on St. Croix, as a disaster center for three and a half months after the storms. A hundred people a day would come to submit applications. When FEMA couldn’t help, residents turned to the Small Business Administration, which also set up offices in the parish hall.Frustration with insurance companies saying homeowners are uninsured or underinsured has led some people to say their insurance is “in God we trust,” said Gloria Euzebe, St. Peter’s senior warden. They’re setting aside repair money in a separate account rather than pay insurance premiums, she said.Even when homeowners settle insurance claims, it’s difficult to find the construction materials and the labor to make the repairs. The same holds true for church properties, some of which are still waiting to settle claims a year later.“We haven’t really done much because of the insurance delay, with a disaster of that magnitude,” said Schuster of St. Peter’s, who serves as senior warden at Holy Cross, also on St. Croix.Church Insurance, which falls under the umbrella of the Church Pension Group, insures church properties. For the past several months, its employees have been busy, said C. Curtis Ritter, senior vice president and head of corporate communications for CPG, in an email to Episcopal News Service.St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Frederiksted was built in 1812 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. It suffered some damage during Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“We try to respond to claims as quickly as possible. With so many disasters occurring back to back, it was hard to keep up the pace, but we did it,” Ritter said, adding that employees travel tens of thousands of miles a year meeting with clients and responding to emergencies.Last year, Hurricane Irma crossed the Virgin Islands as a Category 5 storm on Sept. 6, 2017, causing extensive damage. Two weeks later, on Sept. 20, Hurricane Maria passed over the islands as a Category 5 storm before making landfall in Puerto Rico as a Category 4 hurricane. The two hurricanes led to thousands of deaths and more than $102 billion in damages. Damage to church-owned properties is $7 million, according to Church Insurance.The Diocese of the Virgin Islands consists of 14 congregations spread over five islands: three islands – St. Thomas, St. John and St. Croix – are under U.S. jurisdiction, and two – Tortola and Virgin Gorda – are under British rule. Residents living in the U.S. Virgin Islands are U.S. citizens; residents of the British Virgin Islands are British Overseas Territories citizens. Prior to becoming a territory, the U.S. Virgin Islands belonged to Denmark.Genevieve Edney, a member of St. Paul’s in Frederiksted and a past senior warden, explains that the yard outside the parish hall has been used for recreation in the past. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceSt. Croix covers 84 square miles, and unlike the islands of St. Thomas and St. John, is flat. Agriculture, once big on the island, is making a comeback. In partnership with Jacksonville, Florida-based Fresh Ministries, the diocese is becoming part of the agriculture movement.St. Croix is also home two to historic churches. The Church of England established St. John’s in Christiansted in 1760, and St. Paul’s in Frederiksted was built in 1812. Both are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. St. Paul’s suffered some damage in the storm, and workers made emergency repairs to the rectory. St. John’s fared better in the hurricanes, but needs restoration.The church that housed San Francisco Mission, the diocese’s only Spanish-language congregation, suffered significant structural damage and cannot be repaired. Puerto Ricans from Culebra and Vieques migrated to St. Croix in the 1930s and ’40s to cut sugarcane.The Rev. Amonteen Doward, priest-in-charge at Holy Cross, explains how Hurricane Irma lifted the roof off the church and how it then settled back in place. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFor now, the congregation, or what’s left of it after the storm, is meeting in members’ homes, said the Rev. Aida Nieves, a deacon, who serves San Francisco Mission.Post-hurricanes, Nieves has been working with community members to get them IDs, as many of them don’t have government identification. She’s also working with a woman who lives in the home of her deceased partner, whose name is on the deed, to make repairs.St. Croix is home to five of the diocese’s 14 congregations.Holy Cross also suffered significant damage when the hurricane lifted the roof before setting it back in place.“The whole roof needs to be replaced,” said the Rev. Amonteen Doward, priest-in-charge at Holy Cross and supply priest at St. Paul’s. “Birds are coming in through the open windows.”Danish volunteers put the blue tarpaulin on Holy Cross’ roof, which saved the parish $15,000, Doward said. The foundation shifted under an addition to the parish hall. The mahogany pews need to be refinished.For the time being, the congregation is meeting at St. Luke AME Church.“We’re really homeless in the true sense of the word,” said Doward.A former public health official, Doward provides pastoral care to community members and also directs them to social services if they have needs.Across the island, many people need assistance, said Yvette Ross Edwards, lay dean of St. Croix.And following hurricanes, she said, the churches need to rebuild their missions. “Our missions haven’t died, but people have been consumed with other things,” she said.“We have to go into the community and reach out to them,” said Edwards.– Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of Episcopal News Service. Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Proving ownership of inherited property is a problem on St. Croix Church helps residents secure deeds This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Hurricane Maria, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 By Lynette WilsonPosted Sep 14, 2018 last_img read more

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Episcopal pilgrims bring Spain’s Camino de Santiago to the Appalachian…

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Pilgrims walk through a field on June 26, 2019, on Day 4 of the Appalachian Camino, a weeklong pilgrimage organized by the Episcopal Diocese of Central Pennsylvania on parts of the Appalachian Trail passing through the diocese. Photo: Emily McFarlan Miller/Religion News Service[Religion News Service — On the Appalachian Trail, Pennsylvania] The pilgrims had come to a fork in the road.They had just finished a hard uphill climb on the Appalachian Trail, and they weren’t sure they wanted to head 200 yards in the opposite direction to stop at the Darlington Shelter — even if it was named after the Episcopal bishop who contributed to the development of the trail.But when they arrived, they found a bit of the “trail magic” that the Appalachian Trail is known for awaiting them. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN The idea for the Appalachian Camino came from the Rev. Dan Morrow, the diocese’s canon for congregational life and mission.Morrow is no stranger to pilgrimages.He has traveled to Ireland and to the home of St. Francis of Assisi in Italy, he said.And he has always wanted to walk the Camino de Santiago, which ends at what many Catholics believe to be the resting place of St. James. The walk has exploded in popularity with American pilgrims in the past decade.Morrow said he has never had the time to make the trek, but on a recent day hike on the Appalachian Trail with his wife, it occurred to him that the diocese could bring the Camino to Pennsylvania.“We should do a pilgrimage here along the trail, visiting our sacred spaces with our own group of pilgrims,” he said.It wouldn’t end at the final resting place of an apostle, he said, but “having done other pilgrimages … I just know that the journey is just every bit as important, as transformative, as the destination.”When Morrow approached the bishop with the idea for an Appalachian Camino, she immediately said yes.It fit perfectly with the “Bishop Out of the Box” program Scanlan started last fall. The program is meant to model “how we could engage ministry in different ways and kind of invite people to think creatively, obviously out of the box, to do things differently,” she said.So far, that has taken the bishop to a county fair wearing a button reading “Need prayer?” and to a Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration with a color-by-number picture of King on canvas, among other things.“This is our own opportunity to embody our faith, to say that we’re on a journey and literally, not just figuratively or metaphorically, but literally to journey with others on the way,” she said.Building on the “way of love” espoused by the Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, they referred to the pilgrimage as “walking the way of love in central Pennsylvania,” Scanlan said.By June 25, the fourth day of the Appalachian Camino, some of the pilgrims and their support crew had earned “trail names” like “Go Go Gadget,” “Major Tom” and “Mama Bear.” The bishop was “Trinity on the Trail” and Morrow, “Venom Sucker,” which came with a story recounted with much laughter about how — since the hike had been his idea — he was responsible for rescuing anybody bitten by a snake along the way.They gathered early in the morning for a brief liturgy, including a prayer of blessing for the pilgrims. Scanlan knelt at the feet of those joining them for the first time that day, making the sign of the cross over their boots, and they split into two groups — the faster hikers charging ahead first with the bishop.Morrow set his timer for 10 minutes of contemplative silence as his group began the hike. Everybody was looking forward to the first five miles — relatively flat, according to their maps, after three days of hills and rocks.In the silence, Lisa Work said, she noticed the temperature changes as they crossed an open meadow into the shade of the forest.As the day went on and temperatures soared in the stretches through soybean fields or along the roadside with no protection from the blazing summer sun, Work took turns with fellow hikers pouring cool water from their water bottles onto each other’s heads in a kind of trail baptism.The 52-year-old, who attends St. John Episcopal Church in York, Pennsylvania, also wants to walk the Camino de Santiago someday. For her, hiking is a form of worship, a necessary rhythm, she said.“Some of it I don’t have words for, but the experience has been so real,” Work said. “In the Scripture, it talks about the Holy Spirit understanding the groaning of your gut, and I think that’s what this is. It’ll fall short to anybody I try to describe it to.”It’s different hiking with a group when she’s used to silence and solitude on the trail, she said. But, as she begins a new job heading a school, it has been a reminder how much she needs other people and a chance to unplug and slow down for a week.After climbing a ridge, pilgrims stop to rest and enjoy the view on June 26, 2019, Day 4 of the Appalachian Camino. Photo: Emily McFarlan Miller/Religion News ServiceWork was surprised to have forged a “sisterhood” with several of the women on the trail, including Amanda Kniepkamp, who joined the Appalachian Camino from Philadelphia, where she attends Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral.For Kniepkamp, weekly church services weren’t cutting it anymore. The 40-year-old, who works in academic support at the University of Pennsylvania, said she wanted a deeper experience of her faith.If there was any place she would find that, Kniepkamp thought, it would be in the outdoors. Having grown up in a small town, she gets “city rage” the way others get road rage, she said.Remembering church camps she attended growing up, she prayed, “Please let it not be hokey.”But that hasn’t been her experience on the Appalachian Camino.She has been moved by the worship in the mornings and evenings. And the intensity of the shared experience of hiking the Appalachian Trail, the joys and the adventure, quickly brought the group together, she said.“We’ve been together for three days, and we’re sharing everything about our journey,” Kniepkamp said.That was a theme sounded by several on the Appalachian Camino.Kay Cramer, 66, walked the Camino de Santiago in Spain several years ago when she retired from her career as a hospice nurse. When she heard about the diocese’s pilgrimage inspired by the Camino, she knew immediately she needed to join.“Where I was trying to find myself on the Camino, on this one, I’m finding that it’s more about relationships with other people,” Cramer said. “I’m finding love instead of finding myself.”Others had what could be considered less spiritual reasons for making the pilgrimage — for weight loss or for the challenge of it. Some were hiking along with their children.But then, Morrow said, “I also think not everything has to have a deeper meaning. Hiking is a good in and of itself, just like other things are. You can make connections, and drawing connections is really good, but just doing it is a good in and of itself.”At the end of the 12-mile hike on June 25, the pilgrims let out a “Thanks be to God!” as two white support vans came into view.They piled into the vehicles for the half-hour drive to the Church of the Nativity in Newport, Pennsylvania, a picturesque little church along a river, where they plunged aching and blistered feet into the rushing water.A trailer arrived carrying their backpacks and other supplies, and some of the pilgrims rolled out sleeping bags in the church’s parish hall. Others set up tents around the stone labyrinth in its neatly manicured lawn.Then they gathered in the church basement for a homemade dinner prepared for them by parishioners. Cramer, who belongs to the Church of the Nativity, made a Santiago cake, an almond cake on pilgrims’ menus along the Spanish trail.During a time of reflection afterward led by the bishop in the sanctuary, the pilgrims took turns sharing the highs and lows of the day’s hike.There were discouraging moments on some of the tougher switchbacks and a fall that cut short the day’s hike for one pilgrim.There was encouragement from fellow pilgrims and that trail magic at the Darlington Shelter.And, all in all, Scanlan said, “It’s been a good day — a holy day.” Rector Collierville, TN Environment & Climate Change About 20 pilgrims, most from parishes within the diocese, hiked the full week, staying overnight in churches and parish halls along the way. Another 24 joined as day hikers throughout the week.“We live in such a beautiful place here in Pennsylvania, and the Appalachian Trail is such a gorgeous walk,” Central Pennsylvania Bishop Audrey Scanlan said. “So this is an opportunity to come together in community, in nature and appreciate God’s creation.” Submit an Event Listing By Emily McFarlan MillerPosted Jul 9, 2019 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Episcopal pilgrims bring Spain’s Camino de Santiago to the Appalachian Trail Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Several of the support team members following their pilgrimage along the legendary 2,190-mile footpath had parked their van nearby and hiked a short way to the shelter carrying cold water and Gatorade.“They were, like, magical. They just appeared,” said Debbie Pflager, 67, recounting the high point of the day’s hike during a time of reflection that evening.The group was part of last month’s weeklong “Appalachian Camino,” inspired by the 500-mile pilgrimage across northern Spain. Organized by the Episcopal Diocese of Central Pennsylvania, it took the pilgrims along parts of the Appalachian Trail that pass through the diocese. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

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Anglican Communion calls for COVID-19 responses to tackle gender inequalities

first_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Gender Justice Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Anglican CommunionPosted Apr 28, 2020 Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK During the COVID-19 pandemic, many faith actors are on the frontline. The Anglican Communion is standing together with religious leaders and faith-based actors around the world to advocate to governments and civil society, for urgent responses that protect women’s rights and achieve gender equality.The crisis does not operate in a vacuum and, as a result, the pandemic is increasing pre-existing gender inequalities. Around the world, gender roles have a marked impact on exposure, transmission, and outcome patterns of COVID-19. Women and girls are experiencing intersecting injustices in political, social and economic spheres.Sexual and Gender Based ViolenceIn the statement published today, Faith in Beijing, who are a collective of religious actors and faith-based networks, call for COVID-19 responses to include strategies to address and prevent Sexual and Gender Based Violence. Under lockdown policies, many women are forced to stay at homes where they are not safe or secure. They are forced to live with abusive partners or parents, while services to survivors of gender-based violence are harder to access. In some communities around the world, violence against women during the pandemic has been perpetrated by the security agencies enforcing the lockdown, using undue force.Faith on the FrontlineFaith communities have a strong base from which to promote social distancing (to reduce transmission of the virus causing COVID-19), while also practicing solidarity. Many religious actors hold significant power and trust, sometimes more than the government. Thus, religious institutions can play a vital role in distributing accurate key public health information to their communities. Religious leaders can play a positive role in promoting messages of gender justice, challenging stigma and harmful gender norms.Equality and Justice for AllAs business as usual is paused, we have an opportunity to reflect upon the brokenness in our world and our economic system. In these spaces, we can begin to imagine a world rooted in equality and justice for all. The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed how globally interconnected we are and how gender injustice reveals itself at an individual and a collective level.An international delegation representing the Anglican Communion as well as Mandy Marshall, the new Director for Gender Justice at the Anglican Communion Office, was due to participate in the UN Commission on the Status of Women 64 along with other Faith in Beijing members. While the international gathering of UN Member States and civil society was postponed last month, our work for gender justice remains important, to ensure a just and sustainable future for all.You can read the statement on Gender, Faith and COVID-19 on the Gender Justice page of the Anglican Communion website. Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Back to Press Releases Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY COVID-19, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Communion calls for COVID-19 responses to tackle gender inequalities Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more

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