BAE Systems Awarded Further SRA Work for USS Sterett

first_img View post tag: work View post tag: SRA Authorities View post tag: News by topic June 24, 2015 BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair received a $13,5 million modification to previously awarded contract for fiscal 2015 selected restricted availability (SRA) for the destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104). The SRA includes the planning and execution of depot-level maintenance, alterations, and modifications that will update and improve the ship’s military and technical capabilities.Work will be performed in San Diego, California, and is expected to be completed by February 2016.The Southwest Regional Maintenance Center, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity.[mappress mapid=”16312″]Image: US Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today BAE Systems Awarded Further SRA Work for USS Sterett View post tag: BAe Systemscenter_img View post tag: USS Sterett View post tag: americas View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy BAE Systems Awarded Further SRA Work for USS Sterett Share this articlelast_img read more

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Statistics/Quantitative/Business Analytics Adjunct – Jabs School of Business

first_imgQuick Link to Postinghttps://jobs.calbaptist.edu/postings/6141 Posting Details * Do you attend church regularly?YesNo State and Federal law permit California Baptist University todiscriminate on the basis of religion in order to fulfill itspurpose. The University does not discriminate contrary to eitherState or Federal law. The appointment may include teaching undergraduate and graduatecourses in statistics, quantitative analysis, and businessanalytics. Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Teaching Responsibilities Qualifications Position Summarycenter_img If no, please explain (required):(Open Ended Question)* Are you both familiar with and not in conflict with thefundamental doctrines and practices of the California SouthernBaptist Convention as stated in the Baptist Faith and Message datedJune 14, 2000? (Please see above link for more information)Yes (I am familiar and not in conflict)No (I am in conflict or not familiar) The successful candidate will have a minimum regionally accreditedMaster’s degree (Ph. D. preferred) in related discipline with atleast three years of experience in the field. Prior teachingexperience is a plus. Qualified applicants will become part of anadjunct pool and contacted when a need emerges. Position TitleStatistics/Quantitative/Business Analytics Adjunct – JabsSchool of Business * Are you a Christian?YesNo Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsChristian Experience EssayCurriculum VitaeOptional DocumentsResumeCover LetterLetter of Reference 1Letter of Reference 2Letter of Reference 3Unofficial Transcript The Jabs School of Business at California Baptist Universityinvites applications for an adjunct faculty position instatistics/quantitative analysis. Nondiscrimination Statementlast_img read more

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Beach Replenishment Update: Beaches Closed at 53rd and 54th

first_imgCheck OCNJ Daily for updates and photos of the progress of work of the Ocean City beach replenishment project for 2015 in the south end of Ocean City between 36th and 59th Streets.The Ocean City south end beach replenishment project had reached 53rd Street on Thursday, May 21.DATE: Thursday, May 21PROGRESS: Sand-pumping operations continued at 53rd Street on Thursday, and the beach is closed just south of 52nd Street with access blocked at 53rd and 54th streets. Bulldozers are reshaping the sand berm created by the city in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy to create an entirely new dune structure.The first two phases of the project (from 42nd Street to 37th Street, then from 42nd Street to St. David’s Place) are complete.WHAT’S NEXT: The project will proceed from 55th Street to St. David’s Place (mid-May to mid-June), then from 55th to 59th (mid-June to mid-July).READ MORE: Ocean City NJ Beach Replenishment 2015 Daily UpdateFOR DAILY UPDATES by E-MAIL: Sign up for free A three-wheeled vehicle called a coastal research amphibious buggy (CRAB) surveys the beach elevations at 53rd Street on Thursday, May 21. The hopper dredge Liberty Island can be seen in the background.last_img read more

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Ocean City Little Leaguer Throws a Perfect Game

first_imgDuke McCarron, a 12 year-old, 6th grader in the Ocean City Intermediate School, hurl a 6 inning, perfect game on Wednesday night during a 7-0 victory in the Playoffs of the Ocean City Youth Athletic Association baseball league against the Dennis Township Cubs. A perfect game for a pitcher is defined as a game in which no batters reach base at all for the entire game. In addition to throwing a perfect game, McCarron, had 15 strike-outs and added a grand slam during the victory as well in a game that also featured a solo home run from Evan Taylor. “In my 46 years being involved with Little League here in Ocean City, this is the first ever perfect game that I can remember” said Greg Donahue, the long-time leader of the Ocean City Youth baseball program. “It’s really remarkable”  “I had an idea I was pitching a perfect game because after each inning, my teammate, Brock Cook, kept telling me I had a perfect game through 3 innings, through 4 innings, right up the end” said a very humble McCarron “It was a fun game and something I will definitely remember”Duke McCarronFollowing the game, McCarron’s teammates congratulated him and were in awe of the great performance. “Duke was a beast tonight” exclaimed teammate Alec Wisnefski. McCarron’s team, the Yankees, play again on Friday Night at Upper Township’s Caldwell Park at 6pm against the Upper Township White Sox with Ricky Urban slated as the starting pitcher for the Yankees. The Ocean City Phillies play against the Upper Township Indians at 7:30pm at Upper Township’s Caldwell Park as the playoffs head in to round 2. Duke McCarron delivers a pitch during his record setting performance last_img read more

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Waffle retailer opens training academy

first_imgThe Wafflemeister Academy officially opens today, while its eighth UK site at Westfield Stratford will start trading from 1 June. Alex Troullier, founder, has recruited the former head of Gail’s as head of training at the academy at its flagship Kingston site in south-west London. All employees, excluding franchises, will go through training there to improve the system and give employees a better chance for career progression.Meanwhile, the new opening at Stratford will be a 160sq ft kiosk, as is Wafflemeister’s other kiosk in Westfield White City. Troullier is also looking at a new Westfield site in Bradford, which has not yet been finalised, but would also be a kiosk, this time with seating for 12 to 15 covers.Troullier said: “Site size depends on what is available and the kiosks at the Westfield sites work. We are also in discussions with other countries. We want to expand and have got a lot of interest in the brand with a lot of potential franchisees contacting us.”The company will have five sites in the Middle East following the opening of one in the Laguna Mall in Qatar in August and in the Seef Mall in Bahrain in July.It has just extended its range of thick shakes and gelato flavours, with newcomers including Nutella and cheesecake, as well as looking into introducing different iced beverages.last_img read more

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Lettuce Partners With ACLU, HeadCount To Bring “Participation Row” On The Road

first_imgLettuce has partnered with the American Civil Liberties Union, HeadCount, and WhyHunger for their winter tour, which is slated to kick off in Atlanta on Wednesday, February 7th. All three organizations will have tables and volunteers at each upcoming concert, offering fans plenty of opportunities to take action and potentially win a poster signed by the band.“The issues associated with these three organizations are issues that we care deeply about,” says Lettuce drummer Adam Deitch. “We’re excited for our fans to not only have a good time at our shows, but also leave feeling that they are making an impact in the world.”All of the non-profit activity will be organized by HeadCount, a nonpartisan organization that registers voters and promotes civic engagement in the music scene. The group often organizes “participation rows” at festivals and major amphitheater shows, but Lettuce is one of the first band’s to bring the experience on the road to theaters and clubs. Level, a Denver-based philanthropic consulting firm, is also assisting with the project.“This is a great opportunity for us to get out the vote in the most meaningful way,” said Andy Bernstein, HeadCount’s executive director. “By working with the ACLU and WhyHunger, we’re reminding people what’s at stake in each election and bringing issues to the forefront that are important to the band and their fans.”“I believe in unity and equality,” added Lettuce bassist Jesus Coombs. “We humans are so much more powerful than we are trained to believe. We can do mighty and magnificent things when we are connected through love and respect.”Lettuce will swing through much of the country on their upcoming tour, which wraps up with a two-night run the Madison Theater in Covington, KY on March 30th and 31st. A full list of tour dates can be found below. Tickets for the shows are available via the band’s website.Lettuce 2018 Winter Tour:February 7 – Atlanta, GA (Variety Playhouse)February 8 – New Orleans, LA (Joy Theater)February 9 – Houston, TX (House of Blues)February 10 – Austin, TX (Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater)February 13 – Las Vegas, NV (Brooklyn Bowl)February 14 – San Diego, CA (Observatory at North Park)February 15 – Los Angeles, CA (Wiltern Theater)February 16 – Oakland, CA (Fox Theater)February 17 – Portland, OR (Roseland Theater)February 18 – Seattle, WA (The Showbox)February 20 – Missoula, MT (Wilma Theatre)February 22 – St. Paul, MN (Palace Theatre)February 23 – Chicago, IL (Riviera Theatre)February 24 – Detroit, MI (St. Andrew’s Hall)February 25 – Cleveland, OH (House of Blues)March 22 – Huntington, NY (The Paramount)March 23 – Port Chester, NY (The Capitol Theatre)March 24 – Port Chester, NY (The Capitol Theatre)March 26 – Hartford, CT (Infinity Hall)March 28 – Richmond, VA (The National)March 29 – Greensboro, NC (Blind Tiger)March 30 – Covington, KY (Madison Theater)March 31 – Covington, KY (Madison Theater)[Photo: Alex Varsa]last_img read more

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Hold the soda, hold the fat shaming

first_imgDuring a plane ride, Sara Bleich watched a flight attendant take an overweight passenger’s drink order. The passenger asked for cranberry juice.“Cranberry juice is our highest-sugar beverage on the menu,” the flight attendant said. “Would you like a diet beverage?”“Just give me the cranberry juice,” the passenger said.As a public policy expert on obesity, Bleich, a Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute and a professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, knew that the flight attendant was right about the juice. At the same time, she admired the passenger’s pushback against fat-shaming.Here’s what Bleich wrestles with: We are almost powerless to fight an industry that profits from loading foods with sugar, salt, and unhealthful fats that we are hardwired to crave. Telling people what to eat — and what not to eat — often backfires.“We know that about a third of adults and a fifth of kids are overweight or obese,” she said. “We know that if you have excess body weight, it increases your risk for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, along with a host of other adverse health conditions. As a result, obesity is very expensive: $150 billion a year in direct medical costs.“To actually make a difference, we have to look at the broader environment, specifically all these cues that are trying to get us to eat more and exercise less. How can we make the environment healthier? What can we do to keep people from gaining more weight?”,The first food items you see when you walk into the Dollar General not far from Bleich’s Radcliffe office are racks of supersized bags of Lay’s potato chips, Hostess snack cakes, and mini-donuts. It takes some searching to find a single unprocessed food. There is no fresh produce. The most eye-catching green is on a large, cold case of Mountain Dew.Gluten-free, keto, or paleo may be cool, but to Bleich, calories are key. “If you look at adults in the U.S. and across the developed world, we’re getting bigger because we eat too much, not because we exercise too little,” she said. “Of all the single behavior changes you could make, there’s probably the most evidence that drinking fewer sugary beverages would reduce your risk for obesity.”At home, Bleich’s kids, 5 and 7, are allowed sugary beverages — think 100 percent juice, not Sprite or Pepsi — only at birthday parties. Given the choice of a slice of cake or a juice box, they often go for the forbidden juice. They’re not alone in craving sweet drinks. Adults between 18 and 34 drink more sugar-sweetened beverages than any other age group, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).As a White House Fellow in 2015–2016, Bleich was a senior policy adviser to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Let’s Move! initiative, Michelle Obama’s national campaign to reduce childhood obesity and improve children’s health. To Bleich, banning soda from school lunchrooms and vending machines was a no-brainer. (She’d like to see universities and hospitals do the same.) She believes that “Don’t drink soda” is a clearer message than “Don’t eat junk food,” which could apply to anything from candy bars to fast food — some of which is actually pretty healthful. “We have to look at the broader environment, specifically all these cues that are trying to get us to eat more and exercise less.” Bleich is encouraged by the recent passage of laws taxing sugary drinks in seven U.S. cities. The nation’s first soda tax, in Berkeley, Calif., slashed sales of sugar-sweetened beverages by nearly 10 percent in its first year. “In Berkeley and in Philadelphia, which we’re now evaluating,” Bleich said, “a tax of less than 2 cents per ounce can increase the price of a two-liter bottle of soda by 100 percent, depending on the base price. It’s sticker shock, and it does appear to impact purchases.”Owing to the price hike, supermarkets are seeing an almost 60 percent drop in volume sales of soda. That matters, she said, because people who drink sugary beverages tend to be minorities. Forty-seven percent of African-Americans consume at least one sugary beverage a day — more than any other ethnic group, according to the CDC. They and other soda drinkers also tend to have lower incomes and to be at higher risk for a host of weight-related medical conditions.The beverage tax is controversial. But Bleich sees it as a way to shift funds from the multibillion-dollar soda industry to local communities. In Philadelphia, a beverage tax passed in 2016 pays for quality educational programs for 3- and 4-year-olds, among other city programs. “It’s one of these policies where not only is it targeting behavior we know is bad for you, but the money is being given back to low-income groups in the form of a free, universal pre-K program,” Bleich said. “That is a great example of a policy win.”,The struggles of the disadvantaged resonate with Bleich. The daughter of two public schoolteachers from inner-city Baltimore, Bleich and her family relied on food stamps for a time to make ends meet. She was close to her paternal grandparents — who once lived on New York City’s swanky Upper East Side — and to her maternal grandfather, a Maryland corn farmer who grew up poor and illiterate. Several years after completing a degree in psychology at Columbia University in 2000, she opted to pursue a Ph.D. in health policy at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. En route to Massachusetts, Bleich stopped at her grandfather’s farm. He beamed about Harvard but cautioned, “Don’t get too uppity.”She didn’t get his meaning until months later, when she found herself working on theoretical research topics with little chance of affecting people in the real world. So she decided to study obesity — an issue that begs for workable and practical solutions. “I want to answer the ‘So what?’ question,” she said. “I have yet to come across someone — on a bus, on a plane, on a train — who hasn’t struggled with their weight or known someone who has. I have not had personal weight challenges, but my mother lost a lot of weight and kept it off for 20 years. All of us have stories, and you can learn a lot by talking to people about their stories. The science is one thing, but weight is a very personal issue.”Bleich phoned her “corn farmer grandpa” to say that she’d decided to study obesity. “You’re going to make fat people thin?” he said. “I told him, ‘You cannot call people fat, but yes, I am going to help people try to lose weight.’ He said, ‘Baby, I think that’s wonderful.’”Earlier this year, following weight-loss surgery, the author Roxane Gay recounted her struggle with the psychological underpinnings of overeating. Gay and others — such as the anonymous blogger with tens of thousands of followers who calls herself Your Fat Friend and Ashley Graham, Sports Illustrated’s first plus-size swimsuit cover model — have written about body shaming in America.One message they sometimes convey is that it’s possible to be fat and healthy. Your Fat Friend claims that although her body mass index (BMI) puts her in the realm of the “super morbidly obese,” her indicators are normal. According to a 2016 study in the International Journal of Obesity, a significant percentage of overweight or clinically obese people are, in fact, metabolically healthy. But Bleich wants to be clear that she’s not talking about whether it’s possible for some weight-challenged individuals to have normal blood pressure, cholesterol, and insulin levels.“BMI is an imperfect measure, but there are mountains of literature from epidemiology and other disciplines which say that as your BMI goes up, so too does your risk of all sorts of health conditions,” Bleich said.The danger of celebrating large bodies is that, “It implies it’s OK to be large from a health perspective, and it’s not,” she said. “But we know that stigma can be a real deterrent to seeking help and trying to actually lose weight. And so there’s this delicate balance between reaching out to people who have trouble with their weight and making them feel bad in the process” — as with the flight attendant and the cranberry juice-drinking airline passenger.“Obesity exists. It’s getting worse,” Bleich said. “The solution to obesity does not lie with you or me. It does not lie with individuals. Yes, there are people who will get it together and will actually be able to lose weight and keep it off. But the fact that we have a $66 billion diet industry demonstrates that we’re forever falling off the wagon.“There aren’t obvious solutions. There’s no pill that can fix it. Public health has limited reach and resources. I think the goal is finding sweet spots where the food and beverage industries maximize shareholder dollars but also maximize the population’s health.”One such sweet spot might be making healthful beverages and sides the default in fast-food kids’ meals and adult restaurant combo meals — swapping a no-calorie beverage and salad or fruit, for example, for sugary beverages and fries. If restaurants don’t lose revenue from the switch, this could be a win-win. “Changing defaults can be a powerful public health tool, because diners tend to stick with whatever comes with a combo deal rather than change it for something else,” Bleich said.There’s big money at stake: Americans spend half their food dollars on meals outside the home. But Bleich notes that the entire state of California, along with Baltimore and other cities, have already passed bills mandating healthful beverages as the default for fast-food kids’ meals.“It’s going to take multiple efforts working effectively together to actually move the needle,” she said. “But progress is possible.”This story originally appeared in Radcliffe Magazine’s winter 2019 issue.Deborah Halber is a freelance journalist. Pushup capacity could be no-cost way to assess cardio risks Sickly sweet The unsavory side of sugar Related Symposium examines sweetener’s effects on human body and on public policy Drop and give me 40 Sugar-sweetened drinks increase risk of mortality, especially in women last_img read more

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Mercy Works program promotes solidarity with South Bend

first_imgWhile students are often involved with the Notre Dame community, fewer are immersed in the greater community surrounding the University: South Bend. Mercy Works, a collaboration between Campus Ministry and the Center for Social Concerns (CSC), is one opportunity for students to escape the Notre Dame bubble.Christian Santa Maria, assistant director for retreats and pilgrimages in Campus Ministry, said that Mercy Works offers students the ability to do faith-minded service that has a tangible effect on people near campus. One of the special things about the program, he said, is that it functions as a kind of window into problems that students may never have experienced firsthand before.“Maybe you don’t know much about, you know, people experiencing homelessness, or you don’t know much about juvenile detention centers or prisons,” Santa Maria said. “This could be a really great way to get your feet wet, and kind of explore what it is like to be part of this community.”Mercy Works is a month-long commitment, and new groups begin service at the start of each month during the academic year. Groups consist of two to five students and spend two to four hours volunteering each week at their assigned organization. Because the program is founded in community, each small group also meets once a week to reflect on service, and everyone involved in the program has a reflection dinner at the conclusion of the month.“Students will get a taste for the complexity of the issues that face us as Christians or Catholics today, and hopefully, they start asking deeper questions about their own spiritual life or about … a particular community or population that we’re working with,” he said. “And, in particular, how does faith invite them to ask these questions — not just about what they do, but who they are and who this is shaping them to be.”Mercy Works focuses on integration with the South Bend community and works primarily with local agencies, including Chiara Home, DePaul Academy, Dismas House, Healthwin, Logan Center and Our Lady of the Road/St. Peter Claver Catholic Worker. Any student interested in volunteering is invited to fill out the Google form on the Mercy Works webpage.While volunteering is an important part of the program, its initiative is not solely service, Santa Maria said.“What Mercy Works hopes to invite the students to do is to understand that it’s not just about being a service provider and a service recipient,” he said. “It asks the question, how do we belong to one another? And how does our faith, through service, allow us to understand the meaning of solidarity and what it means to be brothers and sisters with one another?”He said one student had been mentoring students for about three months when she came to him with a question. He said she was unsure, almost stuck in her service; she felt useless and did not know how to continue serving, because she believed it was not effective enough. Santa Maria said he encouraged her to just listen and not try so hard to solve problems, because listening fosters the community that Mercy Works tries to attain.“I think in a school that often promotes solving issues, one of the first steps we are to do is actually listen,” he said. “Mercy Works is not about solving. It’s about walking with. It’s about solidarity. It’s about kinship. It’s about recognizing our relationships with people in our community. The purpose of Mercy Works is to create a culture of encounter where solidarity can happen.”Tags: Campus Ministry, Center for Social Concerns, Mercy Workslast_img read more

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Sienna Miller & Jack O’Connell to Headline London Revival of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

first_img Meet the Pollitts! Stage and screen stars Sienna Miller and Jack O’Connell have signed on to play Maggie and Brick in Tennessee Williams’ Cat on a Hot Tin Roof on London’s West End. The Young Vic production, directed by Benedict Andrews, will play a 12-week engagement at the Apollo Theatre beginning on July 13. Opening night is set for July 24, with the limited run scheduled to end on October 7. Additional casting will be announced later.Set on a Mississippi plantation on the night of Big Daddy Pollitt’s birthday, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof centers on the sexual tensions surrounding the marriage of favorite son Brick and his magnetic wife, Maggie. In an atmosphere of secrets, lies and “mendacity,” which version of the truth will win?Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof premiered on Broadway in 1955 with Barbara Barbara Bel Geddes and Ben Gazzara as Maggie and Brick. The 1958 UK premiere starred Kim Stanley and Paul Massie in the same roles. The 1958 Academy Award nominated film starred Elizabeth Taylor and Paul Newman. The play was most recently seen in London in 2009 starring Sanaa Lathan, Adrian Lester and James Earl Jones as Big Daddy.Miller’s London theater credits include Flare Path and As You Like It. New York stage credits include After Miss Julie, Cabaret, Independence and Cigarette and Chocolate. Her many film credits include Live by Night, Mississippi Grind, Layer Cake, Alfie, Casanova, Factory Girl, American Sniper, Foxcatcher, The Edge of Love, G.I. Joe, Yellow and the forthcoming The Lost City of Z.O’Connell’s theater credits include The Nap, Scarborough, The Musicians and Just. His film work includes Money Monster, 300: Rise of an Empire, Unbroken, ’71, Starred Up, Liability, Private Peaceful, Tower Block, Weekender, Wayfaring Stranger, Eden Lake, Black Dog and the forthcoming Tulip Fever.Cat on a Hot Tin Roof marks the Young Vic’s first production to debut directly on the West End. The design team include Magda Willi (sets), Alice Babidge (costumes) and Jon Clark (lighting). View Comments Sienna Miller & Jack O’Connell (Photo: Charlie Gray)last_img read more

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Credit Union House works with local charity to end food waste

first_imgCredit Union House has long provided a “home away from home” for credit unions in the nation’s capital, but a recent partnership with a local food bank has deepened its connection with its community, while helping to provide hundreds of meals for those in need. Credit Union House serves as a venue for credit unions and other Washington, D.C. organizations, including Congress, to hold briefings, meetings, receptions and other functions, hosting 100 events on average per year.Credit Union House connected with Food Rescue, a nonprofit that connects food donors to food banks and other receiving agencies, earlier this year, resulting in hundreds of donated meals.“The credit union motto is ‘people helping people,’ and at Credit Union House, it’s only natural we would look for ways to help people in our community,” said Sue McCue, Credit Union House director. “We work with green-certified caterers that recycle, compost, and use locally-sourced, sustainable ingredients. Our work with Food Rescue ensures all surplus food from events at Credit Union House gets to those who need it the most.” 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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