Commentary: How Houses Become Homes

first_imgDecember 13, 2017By John KrullTheStatehouseFile.com INDIANAPOLIS – History matters.Place matters.People matter.John Krull, publisher, TheStatehouseFile.comThose are the lessons I glean from chatting with three couples who have built lives and raised families in historic Herron-Morton Place neighborhood. We’re talking as part of a documentary marking the 50thanniversary of the creation of the Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission.All three families – the Osilis, the Greens and the Ranasinghe-Rutts – have lived in their homes, sturdy, stately structures dating from the late 19th century, for more than 15 years. Their stories are tales of reclamation and redemption, of building their present lives on the foundations of the past.It wasn’t always easy.Dan Green and Kristi Allen-Green are police officers.When they first bought their home in 1998, Dan says, people looked at them funny because the neighborhood was part of “Dodge City,” a high-crime area. He and Kristi each had police cruisers to drive, which they parked in front of their house. That reassured the neighbors, he adds, but it didn’t solve every problem.“Even then, I caught people smoking crack in the alley,” he says. “Had a guy passed out in my front yard with no pants on. My daughter found him. Caught people, crackheads, stealing my neighbor’s’ stuff off of their porch. So, there was a lot of that stuff that goes. It doesn’t just happen magically.”Kristi says she loves how much the neighborhood has changed.Thirty years, while working undercover, she says she “bought dope” at a house just around the corner from where she and her family now live.“Now, it’s this palatial mansion,” she laughs.All three families say they have spent years, decades in total, working on their homes. They talk – a little ruefully, a lot lovingly – about the care and maintenance old houses require.Why did they do it?They like the connection with the past.Kishan Ranasinghe and Victoria Mara Rutt, both self-employed, had no intention of buying an old house when they looked at their current home during an estate sale. But the grand staircase spoke to them of a lost elegance. They were enchanted.Vop Osili, an Indianapolis-Marion County Council member and an architect, fell in love with his home twice. He spotted it first more than 20 years ago, when he and his father, who was battling cancer, took a drive through Herron-Morton. They parked at a corner just across from his current home and noted the beauty of the flagpole, the flag flapping in the breeze, the strong trees, the stolid grace of the house itself.When he and his wife, Una, a dean at Indiana University, were looking for a home seven years later, they found the house was on the market. He mentioned the earlier moment to her, they looked at the house and knew they’d found a place to raise their children.Kristi Allen-Green’s home once was owned by Virginia Keep, an illustrator for Hoosier poet James Whitcomb Riley. Kristi says she likes to think of Riley spending time in her home.But the real satisfactions, she says – and her neighbors echo this – come from the ways these old homes enhance lives.Kristi says that too often people are entranced “by the newest, greatest thing.” Sometimes, the old ways are the best.She says these houses have dining rooms that invite families and friends to sit down, break bread and spend time together. Victoria Mara Rutt says that, because the yards are close together and the garages are detached, neighbors see each other frequently and often linger to talk and catch up.Kristi says front porches are a crucial component of neighborliness.“Sitting on your front porch … that’s inviting people to come up and speak and talk to you,” she chuckles. “That’s how I met the Osilis. we were on the porch. Then we were all fast friends.”This neighborhood, like so many others, didn’t save itself.It came together because the people who live here worked and cared and because government encouraged them with tax credits and other forms of support.By working together, these neighbors created a place where history matters.Where place matters.Where people matter.FOOTNOTE: John Krull is director of Franklin College’s Pulliam School of Journalism, host of “No Limits” WFYI 90.1 Indianapolis and publisher of TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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A Glimpse of the Fun at Night in Venice 2018

first_imgIt was a picture perfect weather for Night in Venice Saturday. The boats were draped in TV theme along with the houses along the bay.Check out some of the favorites from the boat parade in this video and stay tuned for the award winners, soon to be announced.(Video by Ryan Givens and special thanks to Kirk & Suzy Dolaway)last_img

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Eric Clapton Announces “Limited Engagement” North American Tour Dates

first_imgEric Clapton will perform a run of solo concert dates ahead of his Crossroads Guitar Festival this fall. According to a press release, the newly added dates are considered a “limited engagement” tour.The legendary guitarist—who is admittedly losing his hearing and suffering from tinnitus, a ringing inside the ear that is often caused by prolonged exposure to loud noise—will perform at San Francisco’s Chase Center (9/11), Las Vegas’ T-Mobile Arena (9/13), and Phoenix’s Talking Stick Resort Arena (9/14).Clapton will be joined by guitarists Doyle Bramhall II and Paul Carrack, bassist Nathan East, drummer Steve Gadd, and keyboardist Chris Stainton with Sharon White and Katie Kissoon on backing vocals. Tickets for these shows will go on sale starting Friday, April 26th at 10 a.m. local time.The fifth annual Crossroads Guitar Festival, going down September 20th and 21st at American Airlines Center in Dallas, Texas, will feature John Mayer, Derek Trucks, Susan Tedeschi, Robert Randolph, Buddy Guy Band, Gary Clark Jr., Jeff Beck, Jimmie Vaughn, Peter Frampton, Billy Gibbons, Sonny Landreth, Sheryl Crow, Robert Cray, and so many more. All profits will benefit The Crossroads Centre in Antigua, a treatment and education facility founded by Clapton for chemically dependent persons.The newly announced tour dates will most likely be Eric Clapton’s last of the year in the U.S. In a 2018 interview with BBC, Clapton emphasized that his time on the road is running out. “I’ve had quite a lot of pain over the last year. It started with lower back pain, and turned into what they call peripheral neuropathy,” he said. “[It’s] hard work to play the guitar and I’ve had to come to terms with the fact that it will not improve.” Clapton went on to tell BBC’s Stephen Wright that he would be limiting the number of plays going forward, explaining, “‘What I’ll allow myself to do, within reason, is carry on recording in the studio. I don’t want to go off the boil to the point where I’m embarrassing myself.”For a full list of upcoming dates, head to Clapton’s website.ERIC CLAPTON 2019 CONCERTSSeptember 11 San Francisco, CA Chase Center**September 13 Las Vegas, NV T-Mobile ArenaSeptember 14 Phoenix, AZ Talking Stick Resort Arenalast_img read more

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Genes tied to prostate cancer uncovered

first_imgFor the first time, researchers have laid bare the full genetic blueprint of multiple prostate tumors, uncovering alterations that have never before been detected and offering a detailed view of the genetic missteps that underlie the disease. The study, made possible by key advances in whole genome sequencing and analysis, points to several new prostate cancer genes and a critical category of genomic changes as important drivers of prostate cancer growth. The work was led by researchers from the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Weill Cornell Medical College. It appears in the Feb. 10 issue of the journal Nature.Unlike other sequencing methods that target specific sections of the genome, whole genome sequencing enables researchers to look across the entire DNA landscape of a tumor, making it possible to discern global changes and patterns. Senior authors Levi Garraway and Mark Rubin and their colleagues used this strategy to view the complete genomes of seven prostate tumors and compare them with normal tissue samples to find regions of abnormality.“Whole genome sequencing gives us fascinating new insights into a category of alterations that may be especially important in prostate cancer,” said Garraway, a senior associate member of the Broad Institute and an assistant professor and medical oncologist at Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber.Prostate cancer is the second most lethal cancer in American men, responsible for more than 30,000 deaths and more than 200,000 new cases each year. A major goal of prostate cancer research is to identify potential drug targets as well as genetic characteristics within tumors that could distinguish indolent and aggressive forms of the disease, and ultimately improve diagnostics and treatment.Rubin, the Homer T. Hirst Professor of Oncology in Pathology and vice chair for experimental pathology at Weill Cornell Medical College, compares the Nature study to looking not just for spelling errors in the genome, but also for whole paragraphs or sections of genomic text that have been rearranged. One of the big surprises is the fact that prostate cancer doesn’t have a large number of misspellings, but instead has a large, significant number of rearrangements, said Rubin. “We would never have guessed that there were so many genomic alterations of this type before now because we didn’t have the right tools to look for them.”These alterations are known as “genomic rearrangements,” a kind of shuffling that occurs when a piece of DNA from one part of the genome breaks off and reattaches itself in another location. These rearrangements can create new genes (called “fusion genes”), allow a gene to operate unchecked, or prevent a gene from even working at all. Such changes can set a cell on a path toward cancer. By looking for genes affected by these rearrangements in multiple prostate cancer samples, the researchers unearthed new genes tied to the disease and found new mechanisms that may be driving cancer as a whole.“This first whole genome view shows us tantalizing evidence for several new prostate cancer genes that likely would have remained undiscovered had we not been taking a genomewide approach,” said Garraway.Several tumors contained rearrangements disrupting the gene that codes for the protein CADM2, part of a family of proteins that prevent tumors from forming (known as “tumor suppressors”). Three samples also contained mutations involving members of the heat shock protein family, molecules that play an important, protective role and keep proteins from losing their proper shape. Anti-cancer drugs that inhibit these proteins are currently in clinical trials, but it is not yet clear whether prostate cancers will be vulnerable to such drugs.Other recurring genomic rearrangements involve the genes PTEN and MAGI2. PTEN is a well-known tumor suppressor gene and MAGI2 appears to be its helpmate; mutations to one or both genes may set cells on the path toward becoming cancerous. Drugs that inhibit the pathway these genes influence are also being developed, raising the possibility that the drugs could be applied to prostate cancer.In addition to uncovering new and suspected genes, whole genome sequencing has also given Garraway, Rubin, and their colleagues insights into how genomic rearrangements arise in the first place. With a catalog of rearrangements in hand, the researchers looked for where breaks and reattachments tended to occur, and found that these events are not distributed randomly across the genome. Rather, in some tumors these events tend to take place in areas of the genome that are inactive or silent, while in other tumors they occur in regions that are highly active. This pattern suggests that mistakes made by cells while turning genes on and off might give rise to DNA rearrangements and therefore play a formative role in cancer’s development.The researchers’ findings may also provide a key starting point for the development of new diagnostic tools for prostate cancer. Currently, when patients are diagnosed with prostate cancer, it is almost impossible for doctors to determine if the disease will advance quickly and therefore require aggressive treatment, or whether the tumors will remain slow-growing, necessitating a wait-and-see approach. “This study could enhance our ability to develop new, diagnostic markers for prostate cancer,” said Rubin. “We can also imagine eventually developing more personalized diagnostic tools for patients with recurrent tumors, to essentially follow the tumors’ progression by testing for new genomic alterations.”Although the researchers’ findings need to be studied further and extended to larger numbers of tumor samples, this initial analysis has opened up many new avenues of investigation, underscoring the power of applying whole genome sequencing to cancer.“Many of these features were invisible before,” said Garraway. “Now, we’re realizing that by sequencing whole genomes in prostate cancer, there’s a lot more to see. These discoveries are teaching us a great deal about prostate cancer biology that we simply hadn’t appreciated previously.”Funding for the project was provided by the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Human Genome Research Institute, the Kohlberg Foundation, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense, the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Prostate Cancer SPORE grant, and the Starr Cancer Consortium.last_img read more

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New cheese manufacturer locating in Swanton at former Via Cheese plant

first_imgGovernor Jim Douglas announced today that a new cheese manufacturing company will be locating in Swanton, creating up to 55 jobs over the next several years.  Swan Valley Cheese will occupy the former Via Cheese facility in the Swanton Town Industrial Park. Via Cheese stopped production and laid of its workers in May.‘I am very pleased to welcome Swan Valley Cheese to Vermont,’ Governor Douglas said. ‘This new entity will not only create jobs in Swanton, but will also use milk from Vermont farms.  Swan Valley Cheese will occupy a production facility that has been vacant for some time.’ The company received assistance from the Vermont Economic Development Authority and has initial approval for $384,133 worth of Vermont Employment Growth Incentives from the Vermont Economic Progress Council.With extensive experience in the cheese-making industry, Swan Valley will produce asiago, fontina and other artisanal cheeses, as well as mozzarella. ‘Restarting cheese production at this plant will also provide local dairy farmers with a place to sell their products, another important boost to the local economy,’ Douglas said.‘We are excited to be a part of Vermont’s agricultural business community,’ Chris Lotito, President of Swan Valley Cheese, said. ‘The availability of milk, the skilled workforce and the strong support that we have received from the Town of Swanton, the Village of Swanton and the State of Vermont was critical to our decision to locate there.’Via Cheese, which had upwards of 50 workers, received a $750,000 Community Development Block Grant to the Town of Swanton, which was to be loaned to Via Cheese, which manufactured mozzarella, provolone, and other products. Additional funding was provided in the form of a $150,000 loan from the Franklin County Industrial Development Corporation.Via Cheese began operations in October 2006 at the former Lucille Farms facility in Swanton’s industrial park. The grant and loans were to fund capital improvements; repairs and upgrades to increase efficiency; and to bring the plant into compliance with Vermont Department of Agriculture and USDA inspection standards.Just prior to its closing, the plant was fined for improper waste disposal. The Department of Environmental Conservation’s Compliance and Enforcement Division announced in March that it reached a settlement with the company involving environmental violations. The settlement included a $10,000 penalty.        Through the Agency’s investigation, it was discovered that Via Cheese discharged approximately 18 loads of waste whey and process waste water into a manure pit in Alburg. Discharge, record keeping, and reporting for these materials is governed by an Agency-issued indirect discharge permit. This discharge location was not authorized by its indirect discharge permit. Additionally, it inaccurately reported to the Agency in March and April 2009 that it did not discharge any waste during those months. The company also failed to submit monthly reports from May through December 2009 and did not maintain a bound daily wastewater disposal journal for 2009 as required by its permit. Along with the fine, the company agreed to follow the Agency’s guidelines.Sources: Governor’s office. Vermont Business Magazine.Via Cheese fined $10000 by DEC | Vermont Business MagazineState announces $750000 grant to Swanton for Via Cheese | Vermont …Via Cheese To Buy Lucille Farms | Vermont Business Magazinelast_img read more

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Vattenfall studying salt-based storage to speed move away from fossil fuels

first_imgVattenfall studying salt-based storage to speed move away from fossil fuels FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Voice of America:At a power station in Berlin, Germany, visitors find a shining piece of machinery that looks out of place in the building. Its silver pipes and containers hold a substance that reportedly could become a major ingredient for producing power in the future.Vattenfall, the station’s operator, says this form of energy would not depend on traditional fossil fuels, such as oil or coal. The company, working with a Swedish company called SaltX, is testing the use of salt to store heat. Yet it is not the kind of salt you add to food.Heat-produced energy represents more than the half the power Germany uses. If it works well, the salt-based energy storage system could help solve a problem presented by renewable energy sources, such as wind and the sun’s energy.The problem is that renewable energy sources are not completely dependable. They sometimes make too much, and sometimes too little power. E.ON, another German power company, recently reported that wind and solar power produced up to 52 gigawatt hours of electricity during daylight hours on Monday, April 22. Germany’s energy usage at the time was just 49.5 gigawatt hours.Hendrik Roeglin heads the salt storage project for Vattenfall. He told the Associated Press that power companies are able to produce twice as much energy as Germany needs through renewable sources. However, they cannot do so continuously. “With many facilities like this one, in theory you wouldn’t need gas or other fossil fuel backups,” Roeglin noted.More: Salt batteries could be major step in move away from fossil fuelslast_img read more

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As Trump’s legal options narrow, he turns to Giuliani for a deplorable PR blitz

first_img– Advertisement – They’ve convinced him that the debunked claim that Dominion Voting Systems machines in some states deleted Trump votes is real, and he is now “personally obsessed” with it, even asking national security officials in the government about the company. Giuliani and Ellis are also true believers in this conspiracy theory. Ellis is the perfect counterpart to Giuliani and Trump, an “uncontrollable figure” in the campaign who regularly fed Trump’s fraud obsession, who would make television appearances without coordinating with the campaign, and who recently started calling herself “President-Elect Jenna Ellis” on Twitter. For some reason.So rather than trying to win in court with valid cases, the plan now seems to be riling up the base by blanketing right-wing media with allies. If they can’t win in the courts, they’ll try to win by intimidation, like the campaign led by Sen. Lindsey Graham to pressure Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to throw out legal ballots. Raffensperger reports not just pressure from Graham, but death threats against him and his wife.In other words, Trump’s reverting to form, going to what’s been working for him so far: enraging his army of deplorables. The good news is that it’s not a winning strategy to get to the Supreme Court, or to get the court on his side. The bad news is that it’s very dangerous for the country.- Advertisement – Yes, believe it or not all Trump’s hopes for getting the Pennsylvania case to the U.S. Supreme Court rest on Rudy, who last appeared in court in 1992. That’ll go well. Trump, according to The Washington Post‘s sources, is “frustrated that his campaign lawyers were not appearing more frequently on television to amplify his baseless claim that he was the real election winner.” So he’s put Giuliani and campaign legal adviser Jenna Ellis in charge of both the legal and public relations efforts. You can guess which is the more important part of this to Trump. He wants to see his loyalists when he turns on Fox News, where his base will see him “keep fighting,” the Post‘s source says.“He is more dug into his position than he was at the beginning,” the source, a Trump adviser, said. “He thinks this is his base for 2024, and that half the country are warriors fighting for him, and that he’s got to keep fighting.” According to that adviser, there are voices telling Trump it’s time to give up. But there’s a louder voice Trump loves to hear, which is Giuliani’s: “In a meeting Friday, Giuliani told Trump that his advisers had been lying to him about his odds of prevailing and that he actually could win, a person with knowledge of the meeting said,” the Post reports.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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COVID-19: East Java denies entry to Viking Sun cruise ship, passengers

first_imgRisma said in a letter that Viking Sun passengers were only allowed to disembark from the ship at Tanjung Perak Port after undergoing a laboratory check, the results of which would be known two days after the test.“However, it is impossible to do [the test] as the Viking Sun only docks in Surabaya for less than 10 hours,” Risma said in a letter, which also stipulated the restriction on the ship’s crew and passengers from disembarking at the port.The restriction will also be applicable to other cruise ships with travel histories to countries with confirmed COVID-19 cases.An official at Tanjung Perak harbormaster’s office Rony Fahmi said the office would follow up the decision: “We decided to deny entry to the Viking Sun cruise ship following a meeting with other institutions.”Read also: Four Indonesians in Japan recover from COVID-19: MinisterState-owned port operator PT Pelabuhan Indonesia III (Pelindo III) vice president Wilis Aji Wiranata said the company would comply with the administrations’ decision.“Our initial plan was to dispatch officials from the port health authority to check on the passengers and crews’ health before they disembarked from the ship. This would be done if the cruise ship is allowed to dock [in Surabaya],” Wilis said.The MV Viking Sun previously docked in Labuan Bajo, East Nusa Tenggara, on Monday. The cruise ship’s captain stated in its Maritime Declaration of Health that all people aboard the ship had been declared healthy.Nevertheless, East Nusa Tenggara health authorities screened all passengers and crew when the ship docked in Labuan Bajo.According to Pelindo III, the MV Viking Sun will continue its voyage to Benoa Port in Bali after docking in Surabaya. The boat will dock at Benoa until Mar. 10 and sail to Lombok the next day, before returning to Surabaya on Mar. 14. After that, the ship will sail to Sri Lanka, where it is scheduled to arrive on Mar. 20. (dpk)Topics : “During a meeting yesterday, we decided not to accept the ship’s request to moor at Tanjung Perak Port to prevent mass panic among citizens,” East Java health agency head Herlin Ferliana told The Jakarta Post on Thursday.Read also: Cruise control? Securitizing luxury cruise ships in times of coronavirusThe decision was echoed by Surabaya Mayor Tri “Risma” Rismaharini, who claimed to have received information that two passengers aboard the ship were suffering from a cold and fever. The passengers recently traveled to New Caledonia and Australia, which is among the countries to have recorded confirmed COVID-19 cases.According to data compiled by the John Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering, Australia had recorded 52 confirmed COVID-19 cases as of Thursday afternoon. To date, two have died from the disease, while 11 others have recovered. As many as 800 tourists from the United States and Australia aboard the MV Viking Sun cruise ship will not be able to visit Surabaya, East Java, as the Surabaya and East Java administrations have denied the cruise ship entry to the city.The Norwegian-flagged cruise ship, carrying 1,395 passengers and crew, initially planned to dock at Tanjung Perak Port in the provincial capital on Friday.The East Java administration rejected the ship’s request to dock at Tanjung Perak as East Java Governor Khofifah Indar Parawansa made the decision not to jeopardize the health of locals.last_img read more

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Rp 1.2 billion of contaminated Korean cabbage seeds culled

first_imgRead also: South Korean contaminated enoki mushrooms no longer circulating in markets: MinistryThe seeds were burned at PT. Koreana Seed Indonesia in Kediri, East Java.The more than 500 Agriculture Quarantine Offices in Indonesia have been intensifying efforts to control imported seeds and produce following an increase in imports, the ministry said in a statement.”The agricultural products have to be healthy, safe and suitable for consumption,” Agriculture Quarantine Agency head Ali Jamil said separately. (vny)Topics : The Agriculture Ministry has destroyed roughly 1.5 tons of Chinese cabbage seeds from South Korea that were found to contain two types of soil-borne bacteria harmful to plants: Pseudomonas viridiflava and Pseudomonas cichorii.Musyaffak Fauzi, the head of the Surabaya Agriculture Quarantine Office in East Java, said Pseudomonas viridiflava had yet to be found in Indonesia and the plants that carried it could not be cured through treatment. Therefore, he said, the seeds had to be exterminated.”This is a serious threat to Indonesian agriculture, particularly horticultural crops,” Musyaffak said after overseeing the destruction of Rp 1.2 billion (US$82,050) worth of cabbage seeds on Thursday.last_img read more

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Paul Merson slams Unai Emery’s Arsenal and says nothing has changed since Arsene Wenger left

first_imgPaul Merson slams Unai Emery’s Arsenal and says nothing has changed since Arsene Wenger left Paul Merson has slammed Unai Emery’s Arsenal following the Sheffield United defeat (Picture: Getty)Paul Merson has slammed Unai Emery’s Arsenal and says nothing has changed since Arsene Wenger left the club.Legendary manager Wenger won three Premier League titles and seven FA Cups at Arsenal but was essentially forced out by dissenting fans last year.Much was expected of Emery when he arrived in England but Arsenal failed to secure a top-four finish in the Premier League last term while losing the Europa League final to Chelsea. Comment Emery reacts to Arsenal’s 1-0 loss to Sheffield UnitedTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 6:38FullscreenEmery reacts to Arsenal’s 1-0 loss to Sheffield Unitedhttps://metro.co.uk/video/emery-reacts-arsenals-1-0-loss-sheffield-united-2032306/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.‘Those days are gone. It’s accepted through the club, the fans, the manager, everyone. Sheffield United played as much football as Arsenal, they didn’t kick them off the pitch.’The Arsenal legend added: ‘What has improved [at Arsenal]? Really, what has improved? Not a lot, at all.‘There’s nobody in that midfield who can open up a can. No matter how bad Arsenal are, everybody will come and sit 10 behind the ball against Arsenal, bar a couple of the big boys.More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves‘Therefore you need special players in midfield to open things up. They haven’t got that pass, that eye-of-the-needle pass.‘Even at the end, with four minutes to go, I’m thinking: “Do they know how long is left? I’m sure there’s an electric clock at Sheffield United, there was when I played there! Is there going to be a bit of urgency?”‘Arsenal, who are currently fifth in the Premier League, face Portuguese side Vitoria de Guimarae in the Europa League on Thursday night.MORE: Ian Wright speaks out on Bukayo Saka penalty incident against Sheffield United Merson says nothing has changed since Arsene Wenger left (Picture: Getty)Arsenal’s familiar problems have resurfaced this season and Merson says the 1-0 defeat to Sheffield United on Monday evening came as a shock to nobody.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTHe told Sky Sports: ‘It was normal, wasn’t it? I don’t know what anybody expected. This is Arsenal now. It’s just lacklustre. There’s no urgency.‘People say they wouldn’t know if this was Arsene Wenger’s team, I don’t know about that because defensively they looked comfortable. David Luiz just played in first gear.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘But going forward, they’ve got no guile. It looked like Chris Wilder knew exactly what he wanted from his side. But with Arsenal and Unai Emery, it was almost like: “See you at half-time and full-time.”‘I kept thinking: “What would this Arsenal side look like if Chris Wilder was in charge?”‘It’s accepted. Nobody is going to work this morning and saying: “Oh my God, did you see Arsenal getting beat by Sheffield United?”center_img Advertisement Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 22 Oct 2019 11:39 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.8kShareslast_img read more

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