History, Assistant Professor, African American History, Tenure Track

first_imgIs this split and/or fully grant funded?No Qualifications Job TitleHistory, Assistant Professor, African American History, TenureTrack Job TypeFull-Time Job CategoryUniversity Faculty Physical DemandsNone Close Date CampusRogers Park-Lake Shore Campus The Department of History in the College of Arts and Sciences atLoyola University Chicago ( LUC ) invites applications for afull-time, tenure-track Assistant Professor of History with aresearch and teaching specialty in African American history, foracademic year 2021-22. The department seeks applicants withexpertise in the African American experience, in any time period.The successful candidate will be joining a department with 29full-time faculty members, over 200 majors and minors, and MA andPhD programs in History and Public History. For more information,please see the Department of History website.This search is part of a University-wide, multi-year hiringinitiative designed to hire outstanding researchers and teacherswho are reflective of our diverse student body and committed tointerdisciplinarity (i.e., working with colleagues across differentsubfields and disciplines) and the pursuit of external grants. Ofspecial interest are candidates who can further the University’sefforts to foster diversity, equity, and inclusion.The successful candidate will teach graduate and upper-levelundergraduate courses in African American History, as well asbroader surveys in the Loyola University core curriculum. Thesuccessful candidate is expected to pursue a strong research andpublication program, including the pursuit of external grants.Teaching expectations generally involve two courses per semesterfor research-intensive faculty. Quick Link for Postinghttps://www.careers.luc.edu/postings/14573 Position TitleHistory, Assistant Professor, African American History, TenureTrack Job Number85TBD FLSA StatusExempt Organizational LocationPROVOST The candidate will have a Ph.D. in History by the start of August2021. Candidates for the position must clearly demonstrate thepotential for excellence in research and teaching and have a recordof (or clear potential for) distinguished scholarship, grant-fundedresearch, and student mentorship. The candidate should be willingto support the mission of LUC and the goals of a Jesuit CatholicEducation. Position Number Special Instructions to Applicantscenter_img Posting Details Duties and Responsibilities Department NameHISTORY Minimum Education and/or Work Experience Location CodeHISTORY (02104A) Open Until FilledYes Candidates should submit to www.careers.luc.edu (1) a letter ofinterest; (2) a current Curriculum Vitae; (3) a statement outliningthe applicant’s research agenda; (4) a statement on teachingexperience; and (5) a statement addressing past and/or potentialcontributions to mentoring a diverse student body through research,teaching and other channels and engaging a diverse communitythrough scholarship and service. Applicants should also arrange forthree recommendations from individuals prepared to speak to theirprofessional qualifications for this position, especially in termsof scholarship, teaching and mentorship, to be submittedelectronically to the above website (letter writers will receive anelectronic prompt from LUC ). Candidates should forward additionalmaterials in digital form related to teaching excellence andsamples of scholarly publications to D. Bradford Hunt, Professorand Chair, [email protected] of applications will begin on January 4, 2021, and continueuntil the position is filled.LUC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer with astrong commitment to hiring for our mission and diversifying ourfaculty. The University seeks to increase the diversity of itsprofessoriate, workforce and undergraduate and graduate studentpopulations because broad diversity – including a wide range ofindividuals who contribute to a robust academic environment – iscritical to achieving the University’s mission of excellence ineducation, research, educational access and services in anincreasingly diverse society. Therefore, in holistically assessingthe many qualifications of each applicant, we would factorfavorably an individual’s record of conduct that includesexperience with an array of diverse perspectives, as well as a widevariety of different educational, research or other workactivities. Among other qualifications, we would also factorfavorably experience overcoming or helping others overcome barriersto an academic career or degrees.As a Jesuit Catholic institution of higher education, we seekcandidates who will contribute to our strategic plan to deliver atransformative education in the Jesuit tradition. To learn moreabout LUC’s mission, candidates should consult our website atwww.luc.edu/mission. For information about the university’s focuson transformative education, they should consult our website atwww.luc.edu/transformativeed. Working ConditionsNone Position Details Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsCover Letter/Letter of ApplicationCurriculum VitaeTeaching StatementResearch StatementOther DocumentOptional Documents Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Number of Vacancies1 Desired Start Date08/09/2021 The candidate will have a Ph.D. in History by the start of August2021. Candidates for the position must clearly demonstrate thepotential for excellence in research and teaching and have a recordof (or clear potential for) distinguished scholarship, grant-fundedresearch, and student mentorship. The candidate should be willingto support the mission of LUC and the goals of a Jesuit CatholicEducation. Position End Date Open Date11/24/2020last_img read more

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Statement to Parliament: Statement to Parliament on Horizon project at Wylfa Newydd

first_imgWith permission, Mr Speaker, I would like to make a statement on the proposed Wylfa Newydd nuclear power plant.Britain was the world’s first civil nuclear nation, and nuclear energy has powered homes and businesses in this country for over 60 years and currently provides around 20% of our electricity needs with low carbon, secure and reliable baseload power.Nuclear has an important role to play in the UK’s energy future as we transition to the low carbon economy. However, we have always been clear that no technology will be pursued at any price: new nuclear must provide value for money for consumers and taxpayers.In 2016, we agreed to support the first new nuclear power station in a generation at Hinkley Point C in Somerset. Developers have set out proposals for a further five plants to come online over the next few decades. As I said at the time the contract for Hinkley Point C was agreed, the Government expects future nuclear projects to provide lower cost electricity than Hinkley Point C.The next project in this pipeline is the proposed Wylfa Newydd power station, based on Anglesey in North Wales. The project developers Horizon Nuclear Power, who are owned by the Japanese company Hitachi, have developed proposals to build two reactors with a combined capacity of 2.9GW. Hitachi’s reactor design has been deployed on time and on budget in Japan, and last December completed the Generic Design Assessment process run by the UK’s independent nuclear regulator, having satisfied our strict safety standards. Horizon submitted their application for Development Consent to the Planning Inspectorate last Friday.I am pleased to confirm that today Hitachi and the UK Government have decided to enter into negotiations in relation to the proposed Wylfa Newydd project. This is an important next step for the project, although no decision has been yet taken to proceed, and the successful conclusion of these negotiations will of course be subject to full Government, regulatory and other approvals, including but not limited to value for money, due diligence and State Aid requirements.A key focus of discussions with Hitachi has been – and will continue to be – achieving lower cost electricity for consumers. Both the National Audit Office and the Public Accounts Committee have recommended that the Government consider variations from the Hinkley Point C financing model in order to reduce costs to consumers. In line with the NAO and PAC’s clear findings and recommendations, for this project the Government will be considering direct investment alongside Hitachi, and the Japanese Government agencies and other parties. Our partnership on this project would serve as a further example of civil nuclear collaboration between the UK and Japan, building on the Memorandum of Co-operation that was signed in 2016 with that country.The UK is likely to need significant new nuclear capacity in order to meet our carbon reduction commitments at least cost, particularly as we electrify more of our transport and heating. So alongside entering negotiations in relation to Wylfa Newydd, the Government will also continue to engage with the other developers in the UK new nuclear market on their proposals for further projects. This currently includes EDF over their plans for a follow-on EPR project at Sizewell C, CGN over their proposals for an HPR1000 reactor at Bradwell, and Toshiba regarding the future of the NuGen project at Moorside, as well as Hitachi over potential further ABWR units at Wylfa and Oldbury.It remains the Government’s objective in the longer term that new nuclear projects like other energy infrastructure should be financed by the private sector, and so alongside our discussions with developers we will be reviewing the viability of a regulated asset base model as a sustainable funding model based on private finance for future projects beyond Wylfa, which could deliver the Government’s objectives in terms of value for money, fiscal responsibility and decarbonisation.Support for nuclear is reiterated in the Nuclear Sector Deal which we will publish with the sector shortly. That deal, which the Government has developed in close partnership with the nuclear sector, will also include ambitious proposals to drive down costs across the sector, including by reducing the cost of construction in new build and by investing in innovation in advanced nuclear technologies.If the Wylfa project were to go forward following this period of negotiation, it would provide around 6% of our current electricity needs until nearly the end of the century, whilst supporting thousands of jobs during construction and operation, particularly in Wales.The actions this Government is taking will support a long-term pipeline for new nuclear projects in this country, and will provide the visibility needed to enable the industry to invest in the skills – including through the National Nuclear College– and the UK supply chain capabilities across the country. I will continue to keep the House informed during the negotiations.last_img read more

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Healthy outlook?

first_imgIf ’pastygate’ drew bakers on to the capital’s streets in protest at the addition of VAT on hot pies, then brace yourself for a full-scale storming of Westminster if the latest thinking in medical circles gains traction. A recent paper in the British Medical Journal made headlines recently by calling for a shake-up of food taxation, so that goods or bads, if you will are taxed according to how healthy they are.On top of that, report author Dr Mike Rayner of Oxford University is also urging the government to eradicate VAT exemption on perceived unhealthy products, such as cold pasties. So should bakers be sharpening their peels and booking the National Express to Victoria? Not yet. Public health minister Anne Milton quickly distanced herself from the report’s recommendations, stating that “collective voluntary action” was the govern-ment’s preferred route to tackling obesity.An ’unhealthy food tax’ based on the fat, salt, sugar and calorie profile of a food item would be a tough political sell in light of the calamitously unpopular hot takeaway food VAT hike. But it does show how thinking around food health is shifting away from single nutrients, such as saturated fats, towards the overall healthiness of foods, and that taxation is in the mix of solutions.Even so, the sat fat reduction debate has not gone away. Since the Food Standards Agency (FSA) dropped 5-10% saturated fat reduction targets on an unsuspecting industry in 2009, the issue has gone following a change of government. Meanwhile, the Department of Health (DoH) absorbed the FSA’s nutrition regulatory role and launched the Responsibility Deal (RD) Food Network a vehicle for manufacturers and health organisations to set nutrition pledges. This has so far covered calorie labelling, salt and trans fats reduction in phase one, and calorie reduction, increased consumption of fruit and vegetables and salt reduction in catering in phase two. But the RD has yet to formally address sat fats.Sat fat pledgeThe DoH has revealed to British Baker that work will begin later this year to develop a collective pledge on saturated fat, which will form part of the programme for the RD. The intention is to complete this work by Easter 2013. Worryingly, the DoH tells us: “The RD supersedes any work previously undertaken by the FSA to develop targets for saturated fat reduction and portion size for a range of foods, including cakes, biscuits, etc.” So where does this leave companies that have slashed their sat fat levels?”If the DoH were to issue another 10% reduction, then we’d have a problem,” says Stephen Bickmore, UK commercial manager of fats supplier Vandemoortele’s lipids division. “Some people took no notice and carried on as they were. But those companies that were quick to the game and achieved a reduction in their saturated fat levels would have to do it again. Some have reduced sat fats by 30-40% in the last couple of years and you cannot do any more without ruining the product completely.”We have to be careful about where the start point is, and this is a conver-sation I’ve had with the DoH.”While Vandemoortele has developed margarines that reduce levels from a standard 82% to 75%, 70% or even lower, it is leaving nothing to chance, and is investigating new ways to take sat fats down further. But the feeling is that the DoH is out of touch with progress already made to reformulate healthier bakery products.”If there’s a communications gap, it’s from the government to the manufacturer, and understanding the headaches it causes when you ask for another 5% reduction it’s another reformulation and you have to adapt your process,” says Adrian Short, director at Ulrick & Short, which supplies ingredients based on tapioca extracts for use in reduced-fat recipes. “A lot of plant bakers have stripped back R&D, and there’s a lot of time needed for R&D (for reformulation).”There are major technical, financial and consumer challenges for companies to overcome when new targets arise, which can be particularly onerous for small and medium-sized bakeries. “For example, fat reduction has a direct impact on product integrity, with some fat needed to avoid crumbling, and on processing requirements such as maintaining the shape of a biscuit before placing it in the oven, and the release of liquid fat during cooking,” says Barbara Gallani, director of food safety and science, Food & Drink Federation. “In cream-filled cakes, pastries and biscuits, as well as those containing or coated in chocolate, there is often a need for solid, saturated fat to hold the structure. The direct replacement of saturated fat with other fats can lead to the migration of liquid components and ’oiling out’.”Fats suppliers such as AAK have invested heavily to overcome the technical hurdles, inventing pumpable alternatives to boxed fats, as well as reduced saturates and lower-fat versions of standard cake and pastry ingredients. But has the will to use them ebbed away? “The double-dip recession has re-focused minds and, where once the drive to improve nutrition might have been a deciding factor in recipe reformulation, now it’s just as likely to be cost,” says Judith Murdoch, marketing controller at AAK. “In many cases, consumers are forced to choose price over nutritional profile and the pasty tax VAT on hot food won’t help.”Amid sky-high egg prices, it is hardly surprising if bakers prioritise maintaining their price point over health reformulation especially with the sat fat issue left in limbo by government with no universal agreement on whether sat fat reduction is a good or bad thing.”A lot of the papers being published in peer-reviewed journals are less in your face about having to reduce saturated fats per se,” comments ’fat consultant’ Geoff Talbot. “What they’re saying is that if you reduce sat fat, you have to be very much aware of what you put in its place. Taking sat fat out and putting carbohydrates in flour or sugar or whatever has been shown to be a bad move nutritionally.”So what about taxation? While David Cameron made positive noises at the 2011 Conservative Party Conference about Denmark’s recent sat fat food tax, even Dr Rayner admits we’re unlikely to see the UK follow suit. “My advice to him was to be a bit cautious on that one, but certainly to look at the French soft drinks tax. Refor-ming VAT would take a lot more political will than a sugary drinks tax,” he says.”What I’m arguing for is not taxation based on a single nutrient, such as satu-rated fat. We’ve done some modelling on the Danish saturated fat tax and we think that might not be at all good for health. You need to tailor your taxation towards the overall healthiness of the food. We’re not optimistic we’d see such a tax tomorrow, or indeed in the next couple of years. People like me need to convince that these taxes would actually have the effects we’re claiming.”While politicians scratch their heads for solutions to the UK’s obesity problem, the solution will remain a hot pasty issue to be juggled around Whitehall. But for now, heed these reassuring words from a DoH spokesperson, and interpret them as you will: “We have made clear (the government) does not wish to adopt a top-down approach to tackling obesity and other diet-related health issues. We want people to know that they can change their lifestyle and, by doing so, they can make a difference to their health.” Sat fats and obesity Saturated fat is a major source of energy (calories) in the diet. The National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2008/09-2009/10) showed average population intakes of sat fat fell slightly from 13.3% in 2001 to 12.8% in the period above. This appears to be due to reduced contribution from whole milk, butter and savoury snacks, and is despite an increased contribution from meat and meat products. The government has expressed in the past that sat fats should account for no more than 11% of food energy intake.last_img read more

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Abbey appoints new group operations director

first_imgBulk food transport service provider Abbey Logistics Group has appointed Tony Kenny as operations director.Kenny is described as having broad experience in logistics and has held senior roles in some of the UK’s largest logistics companies spanning sectors including food, retail, consumer, FMCG and chemicals.Steve Granite, chief executive at Abbey Logistics Group, said the company was delighted to have someone of Kenny’s calibre on the team.”The importance of this role cannot be underestimated as we pride ourselves on our service delivery for our customers, he said.“Tony’s drive for continuous improvement will exceed our customers’ expectations and further strengthen our reputation as a flexible, reliable, customer-focused organisation.”Kenny will be responsible for the day-to-day running of operations across Abbey’s three divisions: bulk powder logistics, bulk liquid logistics and the warehousing and distribution service.Kenny said he was excited to be joining the company.“I have joined Abbey Logistics at a tremendously exciting time; the new ownership structure combined with the ‘can-do’ positive outlook of the team and a dedication to take problems away from customers were among the key reasons I was drawn to the company,” he said.“I believe I can make a real and lasting impact on the way Abbey interacts with its customers and the service it provides.”last_img read more

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L.A. Rapper Murs Is Attempting A Guinness World Record For Longest Rap Session [Watch]

first_imgAfter beginning his quest to earn a Guinness World Record for longest rap session yesterday at 11am PST, Los Angeles-based rapper Murs is about to bring it home. And as of 11am PST today, Thursday, October 13th, Murs will have completed the task that he announced he would undertake last month.The 24-hour attempt is currently being live-streamed (check out the video below), with Murs essentially spitting rhymes non-stop, outside of an allowed five-minute break every hour. He can’t go over that five minute time period without being disqualified. He is performing a mix of his own tracks and other artists’ work to mix things up, as this isn’t a freestyle contest.We wish him the best of luck. It’s always good to have a goal, kids, remember that. Check out Murs’ live attempt below:[via FactMag]last_img read more

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HMS faculty wins Clinical Scientist Development Award

first_imgAdam J. Bass, assistant professor in the department of medicine at Harvard Medical School and assistant professor of medicine at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, has won a Doris Duke Charitable Foundation 2012 Clinical Scientist Development Award. His work will focus on targeting SOX2-driven squamous cell carcinoma. The award includes $486,000 of annual support for three years.The award provides grants to junior physician-scientists to facilitate their transition to independent clinical research careers. This year, the foundation awarded grants to 16 investigators. The mission of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation
 is to improve the quality of people’s lives through
 grants supporting the performing arts, environmental conservation, medical research, and the prevention 
of child abuse, and through preservation of the cultural and environmental legacy of Doris Duke’s properties.Read more information.last_img read more

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Vermont Law School to witness Vermont Yankee trial starting September 12

first_imgVermont Law School faculty experts will attend opening arguments at the Vermont Yankee federal trial on Monday, September 12.  They also will continue to analyze key developments in the case on the school’s Vermont Yankee lawsuit faculty commentary blog at http://vtyankeelawsuit.vermontlaw.edu/(link is external)  Professors Pat Parenteau and Cheryl Hanna will attend Monday’s opening arguments in U.S. District Court in Brattleboro. Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC et. al. v. Shumlin et. al. is being watched nationwide because of its potential to affect nuclear power across the United States. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has renewed Entergy’s current operating license, which expires in March 2012. But the Vermont Legislature won’t allow the state Public Service Board to issue a certificate of public good, which is required under Vermont law.Entergy’s lawsuit challenges the constitutionality of Vermont’s law giving Vermont lawmakers veto power over the reactor’s operation, as well as the right of any state utility commission nationwide to determine whether nuclear power should be part of a mix of electricity generation produced within any state.Vermont Law School, a private, independent institution, has the top-ranked environmental law program and one of the top-ranked clinical training programs in the nation, according to U.S.News & World Report. VLS offers a Juris Doctor curriculum that emphasizes public service, a Master of Environmental Law and Policy degree and two post-JD degrees, the Master of Laws in Environmental Law and the LLM in American Legal Studies (for foreign-trained lawyers). The school features innovative experiential programs and is home to the Environmental Law Center and the South Royalton Legal Clinic. For more information, visit www.vermontlaw.edu(link is external).last_img read more

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BNEF says new wind, solar now cheaper than existing coal generation in Australia

first_imgBNEF says new wind, solar now cheaper than existing coal generation in Australia FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:The era of cheap coal power in Australia is over; brought to an abrupt end by ever cheaper solar and wind power generation, and by rising coal prices, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s Kobad Bhavnagri.“This is something that we only projected would occur in the mid 2020s. But the change in economics, particularly the increase in domestic coal pricing, has meant that this tipping point is already upon us today,” Bhavnagri said.Certainly, the fact that solar and wind have become the cheapest forms of new bulk electricity supply in almost every major energy market around the world – including Australia – is well accepted, including by the Australian Energy Market Operator.“It’s also cheapest, now, to build bulk dispatchable capacity from a wind farm, coupled with a battery, than it is to build a new coal-fired power station – or gas. The cost of building new peaking generation in Australia now favours batteries. For short durations, for an hour or so, a battery is cheaper than building an open cycle gas turbine or a gas reciprocating engine.”But the fact that Australia’s existing coal power fleet is – already – no longer the cheapest form of energy generation has not yet sunk in, Bhavnagri says, even against the backdrop of the global climate emergency. “A phenomenon that has not been well understood or well publicised is that the era of cheap coal in Australia has really come to an end. And that is true even for the existing generation assets.”This conclusion is also reflected in AEMO data, and in its newly released Quarterly Energy Dynamics report, that found the biggest reason for record prices was the rising cost of coal and gas generation. In the last quarter, coal was bid at prices of more than $100/MWh for more than half the time.More: Age of cheap coal power is over for Australia, says BNEFlast_img read more

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Loss prevention strategies for uninsured auto loan collateral

first_imgFailure to recognize your responsibility to protect your interest in your borrowers’ vehicles may result in financial loss, borrower aggravation and administrative burden for your credit union. Your borrowers risk heavy repercussions when they choose to drive uninsured. However, because few states require drivers to maintain comprehensive and collision insurance, many borrowers may choose not to purchase the additional coverage. A study conducted by the Insurance Information Institute reported that 23% of insured drivers lack both comprehensive and collision coverage. While you may have no control of your borrowers’ driving habits, you are able to encourage them to protect your interest in the vehicle.As a lender, you’re not only able to offer borrowers financial resources to purchase vehicles, but you’re also able to remind them to maintain the required amounts and types of insurance coverage to help prevent unexpected financial strain as a result of vehicle damage. Expressing appropriate concern early may help both parties mitigate risk. However, if a borrower continues to lack adequate insurance and your attempts to connect with them are ineffective, it’s important for your institution to protect itself from potential losses. According to recent research on uninsured motorists, 12.6 percent of drivers are uninsured nationwide.While the reasons drivers continue to lack insurance may vary, thankfully a strategy exists that is designed to protect your interest in uninsured collateral. Collateral Protection Insurance (CPI) was developed to identify exposure, protect the lender’s interest and to relieve the administrative burden associated with borrower communications and insurance monitoring.To read the entire whitepaper click here. 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Cindy Bryant Cindy Bryant has spent nearly 30 years working with insurance risk management programs.  She began her early years out of college working on the frontlines, directly interacting with financial institutions … Web: www.alliedsolutions.net Detailslast_img read more

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