Riverboat Casino, County Get Partial Win In Tax Court

first_imgThe Indiana Tax Court dealt a win and a loss to a county and a casino that were arguing over how much a gambling resort was worth during the Great Recession.Belterra Resort Indiana and the Switzerland County Assessor offered different appraisals valuing Belterra’s casino property during 2009 through 2014. The Indiana Board of Tax Review sifted through the different approaches and methodologies taken by the resort’s appraisers and the county assessor.At the conclusion, the board found the total real property value of the resort was $98.5 million for both 2009 and 2014.Both the county assessor and Belterra appealed.The Tax Court affirmed in part and reversed in part in Switzerland County Assessor v. Belterra Resort Indiana LLC, 49T10-1705-TX-00009. In reviewing the arguments, the court restated the issues as whether the Indiana Board erred when it rejected the resort’s hotel valuation and adopted the county’s going concern valuation. The court affirmed the Indiana Board’s decision that Belterra’s valuation of its hotel is not supported by the evidence. In particular, the appraisal of the resort’s hotel did not make any adjustment for the differences in physical attributes, amenities and business models. The record shows the appraiser relied on income and expense data from a Kentucky Ramada Inn and a Kansas Hampton Inn and did not consider the difference in services provided between those two hotels and the hotel at Belterra.However, the court reversed the Indiana Board’s adoption of the county’s going concern valuation.Belterra asserted the market conditions declined during the recession and, as a result, its resort suffered declining earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA). The Switzerland County assessor countered by presenting an analysis by an independent appraiser who projects the resort’s EBITDA would grow through the recession.Contending the casino’s own projections indicate it did not believe the economy was as turbulent as it later claimed, the county said the market value-in-use of the resort’s real property was $134.3 million in 2009 and $127.0 million in 2014. Belterra said the assessment should have been $44.4 million in 2009 and $48.7 million in 2014.In rejecting the county’s claims, the tax court noted, in part, the assessor’s own evidence showed a lower growth in retail sales and population in the resort’s service area and that Belterra’s gross gaming revenue shows the resort was not increasing its market penetration rate. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharecenter_img Marilyn Odendahl for www.theindianalawyer.comlast_img read more

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Health watch

first_imgBakery companies have swung into action after an investigation into the effects of additives on children’s behaviour.The Food Standards Agency (FSA) recently announced that eating or drinking certain mixes of colourings, including Sunset yellow (E110), Quinoline yellow (E104), Carmoisine (E122), Allura red (E129), Tartrazine (E102) and Ponceau 4R (E124), together with the preservative sodium benzoate, could be linked to a negative effect on children’s behaviour. This follows the publication of an FSA-commissioned study by Southampton University.The FSA suggested that parents who think their children show signs of hyperactive behaviour should avoid foods containing artificial colours and the preservative sodium benzoate.BakeMark UK said that the colourings are found in products such as doughnut toppings and icing. “As a result of the research findings, BakeMark UK plans to evaluate alternatives to these ingredients as part of its continued commitment to offering its customers better-for-you options,” said Vera Malhotra, head of marketing at BakeMark UK.Gary Gibbs head of product development at British Bakels said: “We have removed these ingredients from our range and now use natural alternatives. But these are generally less vibrant and fade-resistant than the artificial colours.” He added that this announcement from the FSA may cause problems for importers of bakery goods.Three-year-olds and eight- to nine-year-olds were tested in the FSA study, which investigated additives commonly used in children’s food.last_img read more

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The search is still on for BBC One bakery family

first_imgTV production company Wall to Wall is still on the look out for a baker and their family to take part in a new programme, labelled a “living history experience” for BBC One. Wall to Wall, the makers of Edwardian Country House, Who Do You Think You Are? and New Tricks, is hoping to find a lively outgoing family, ideally with at least two children between the ages of eight and 18, to rise to the challenge of living and trading their way through 100 years of British history. The baker and their family will join other shopkeepers in a parade of shops that will be completely kitted out as they would have been in Victorian Britain – using a Victorian bread oven. Each family will then run their shop as authentically as possible in other key eras of British history including Edwardian, World War Two, 1950s, and 1970s.Anyone interested in taking part would have to relocate to the town for about eight weeks and be able to reflect on the highs and lows of their experience. Filming will begin this summer, with each programme taking around five days to film.For more information, or if you are interested in taking part, please contact Michael Fraser on 020 7241 9349, or email [email protected]last_img read more

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China blasts Pompeo over accusation of genocide in Xinjiang

first_imgBEIJING (AP) — A Chinese government official has accused former U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo of trying to cripple Beijing’s relations with new President Joe Biden’s administration by declaring China’s actions against the Uighur ethnic group “genocide.” It’s the latest in a Chinese attempt to counter efforts in Western countries to cut trade ties and sanction Chinese officials over widespread reported abuses in the region, including mass detention, forced labor and forced birth control. The comments come as Biden’s administration is formulating its policies toward China, which many analysts call the biggest geopolitical challenge facing the U.S.last_img read more

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Hamilton & More Shows Set for Stars In The Alley

first_img View Comments Daveed Diggs, Okieriete Onaodowan, Anthony Ramos & Lin-Manuel Miranda in ‘Hamilton'(Photo: Joan Marcus) Hamilton, Waitress and American Psycho are just some of the shows that will be participating in this year’s Stars in the Alley. As previously reported, the event is scheduled to take place on June 3 at 12:30 PM in Shubert Alley, between Broadway and 8th Avenue and 44th and 45th Streets. The free outdoor concert in the heart of the Theater District will celebrate Broadway with star appearances and performances from over 30 new shows and long-running favorites, accompanied by a 12-piece live orchestra.This year’s razzle dazzle roster will also include: An Act of God, Bright Star, The Color Purple, Disaster!, Eclipsed, The Father, Fiddler on the Roof, Fully Committed, The Humans, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, On Your Feet!, Paramour, She Loves Me, School of Rock, Shuffle Along, Tuck Everlasting, Aladdin, An American in Paris, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, Chicago, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Finding Neverland, Fun Home, Jersey Boys, Kinky Boots, Les Misérables, Matilda, The Phantom of the Opera, Something Rotten! and Wicked. “Broadway has never had a bigger variety of offerings. With more shows participating in this concert than ever before, it is even more apparent that our goal of having something for everyone on Broadway is succeeding,” said Broadway League President Charlotte St. Martin. “No wonder we are breaking attendance records again! Join us in celebrating one of Broadway’s most exciting seasons as we count down to the 70th annual Tony Awards.”A host has yet to be announced, but Great White Way alum Darren Criss emceed last year’s Stars in the Alley. The productions are subject to change but then the rain-or-shine event is FREE!last_img read more

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Vermont congressional delegation opposes Obama heating aid cuts

first_imgThe Vermont congressional delegation today opposed a White House budget proposal that would nearly cut in half a heating assistance program for seniors and low-income families with children.Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, said ‘heat in the winter is not a consumer choice. It’s not a luxury.’ Instead of cutting heating assistance, Leahy said Congress should end tax breaks for oil companies that ‘are just using them to make obscene profits.’Sen. Bernie Sanders was the chief sponsor of a 2008 bill that increased federal heating assistance. He said he was disappointed in the president’s budget proposal. ‘This senator will do everything he can to make sure that the budget is not balanced on the backs of the weak, the vulnerable, the sick or the old who can’t afford to heat their homes in the winter,’ he said.‘This is simply wrong,’ added Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.). ‘We must not balance the budget at the expense of Vermonters struggling to heat their homes in winter. Instead of turning off the heat, we should be turning off the billions of dollars in subsidies we provide the oil industry.’The delegation led an effort in Congress that doubled funding for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program to $5.1 billion a year for the past three years. The program provides critical assistance for senior citizens, persons with disabilities, and low-income families with children.Nationally, more than 8 million Americans rely on the program to stay warm in the winter. If Congress goes along with the president’s budget proposal, more than 3 million Americans would be denied the help they need to keep their heat on during the winter.Vermonters today are paying nearly $3.50 a gallon on average for heating oil, up more than 70 cents a gallon from last year. At the same time, the average grant for Vermonters is less than it was last year because more families now qualify for help. About 27,000 Vermont households will receive assistance this year, up from 20,350 households last year.Source: Vermont congressional delegation BURLINGTON, Vt., Feb. 14 ‘last_img read more

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FARC Leader of 21 Years Alias ‘Samuel’ Killed in Combat

first_imgBy Dialogo September 12, 2012 Twelfth Brigade Troops assigned to the Colombian National Army’s Sixth Division, killed second-in-command and chief financial officer of the FARC’s third front a.k.a “Samuel”, during the development of Military operations; they arrested another guerrilla and managed to recover a minor in Caquetá department. So far in September, 60 FARC terrorists have been neutralized. The operations advanced in the southwest region of the country by Colombian Army units of the 12th Mechanized Cavalry Group, “General Ramón Arturo Rincón Quiñones,” neutralized “Samuel,” who had spent 21 years in the terrorist organization led by guerrilla alias “Duverney”. “Samuel”, whose real name was Ramiro Vargas Guerrero, is suspected of having participated and directed the occupation of the town of Belén de los Andaquíes, north of La Paya National Park in 2001. During that act, they killed five members of the National Police, and wounded seven others, as well as kidnapped the town’s doctor. Guerrero participated and led multiple illegal detentions and at least nine terrorist actions with explosives against the electrical interconnected towers between the towns of Gabinete and Florencia. In 2010, he participated and led the terrorist action in the town of San Miguel, Putumayo, in which eight members of the National Police were killed. During the Military operation, authorities seized an AK-47 with two suppliers, eight cylinders equipped for terrorist attacks, a mortar and a small bag with tools for the manufacturing of explosive devices. According to investigations, these devices would have been employed in terrorist actions in the same area of the country. “Vladimir”, a member of the terrorist stronghold who was placed at the disposal of competent authorities, was captured simultaneously. Authorities also recovered a minor who was placed in the hands of the Colombian Family Welfare Institute (ICBF). In recent days, two terrorists surrendered voluntarily, while ongoing military operations resulted in the death of five others.last_img read more

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Retreat generates new access-to-justice ideas

first_imgRetreat generates new access-to-justice ideas Retreat generates new access-to-justice ideas Senior Editor Imagine a website where someone who wanted to handle a relatively simple matter without a lawyer could get basic information, simple forms, and help in navigating the legal system. (California, by the way, just opened such a site.) Or how about a hotline where a single mother could ask about getting a landlord to fix a problem? Or a noncustodial dad could call with a child support question. Or a consumer could get advice about remedying a defective product. And perhaps imagine a legal services delivery system that gets state funds and includes an education component so all citizens have a chance to learn about their rights and legal options. Those were all ideas bandied about by participants at The Florida Bar Board of Governors retreat August 24-25 in Naples. Bar President Terry Russell made “Access to Justice: It Affects Us All” the theme of the gathering, and at the end he expressed satisfaction with the results. “I’m extremely proud to be a part of this,” he said. “The dedication that has been shown has overwhelmed me.. . . We will move forward with this, I promise you that. Your efforts will not go unrecognized and unrewarded.” Russell said he learned on a visit with a food bank to a tenement in northwestern Broward County state how desperate the needs were. He recalled seeing rooms with exposed wiring and cheap food with little nutritional value on the shelves. “How do we help people who have not had higher education or a legal education to solve their everyday problems?” Russell asked, adding that day gave him “an absolute recognition that help was needed and self-help was almost impossible.” Middle-income people face many unmet legal needs and a fear they can’t afford legal help, he added. Participants listened to a panel discussion on access issues for low- and middle-income citizens, heard statistics on the realities of legal aid matters, were presented with a recent national poll that showed overwhelming public support for government funding of legal aid (see related story, page 9), and heard a talk on innovative legal access programs. They then broke out into six smaller groups and brainstormed ideas before meeting on the final day to share those ideas and discuss how to follow up on their suggestions. Besides the Bar board, participants included members of the Young Lawyers Division Board of Governors, The Florida Bar Foundation’s Board of Directors, the Florida Access to Justice Committee of the American College of Trial Lawyers, the Bar’s Citizens Forum, and other guests. First District Court of Appeal Judge William Van Nortwick, who chaired the steering committee that organized the retreat, presided over the final session where the six breakout groups reported their recommendations. He noted that recommendations seemed to fall into five general areas, with many other specific recommendations. “That by itself is an incredibly creative result,” he said. Those five areas are: • There needs to be an organization, either a committee or task force set up by the Bar or special commission created by the Supreme Court, to continue studying and working to improve access to the system. • Citizens need more ways to get quick answers to basic legal questions, through such means as an Internet website, legal clinics, or a phone hotline. • Alternative dispute resolution techniques need to be expanded to catch legal problems of the poor and middle class before they require courtroom resolution. • Education of the public about ways to find resources to solve their legal problems needs to be expanded. • There needs to be more funding of legal aid in Florida, including looking to the state. Florida is one of the few states that does not provide state funds for legal aid and related services. To that list, former Bar President James Rinaman added a sixth. He recommended finding a way to bring lawyers and needy consumers together, noting Jacksonville Legal Aid has a clinic, staffed by lawyers who answer consumer questions. “We can resolve many problems right there,” he said. Within those generalities fell most of the recommendations from the breakout groups. Specific proposals included helping new lawyers pay off student loans when they take jobs that improve legal access, finding better ways— including radio and TV ads — to let the public know about already available legal services, using websites to help people representing themselves in court cases, finding ways to extend prepaid legal services to the poor, expanding the jurisdiction of small claims courts perhaps to $25,000, expanding the jurisdiction of county courts which are known as the “people’s courts,” following the lead of the Florida State and St. Thomas University law schools by making pro bono mandatory for students, encouraging businesses to participate in ADR when they have disputes with consumers, and perhaps even creating special taxing districts, as is done for hospitals, to raise funds for legal services. Bar Board of Governors member Ervin Gonzalez said it’s important to remember that it’s not only for altruistic reasons that improving access is important. “By helping with legal services issues, we will be increasing property values, which will increase the tax base,” he said. “We will be fighting crime, and we will be improving communities.” Two of the breakout groups discussed whether pro bono should be mandatory for Bar members, but reached no consensus. President Russell, in his concluding remarks, said he would not support that. Mandatory pro bono would undercut the voluntary efforts that already have more than half of the attorneys in private practice in Florida contributing around $150 million in services to the poor, not counting more work for community and civic organizations, he said. One group, moderated by Board of Governors member Sharon Langer, proposed reversing the trend of sending more and more problems to the courts to be resolved. Instead, that group suggested more use of ADR and administrative procedures to resolve disputes. “All problems are not legal, and all solutions do not require the courthouse,” said Fran Tetunic, a law professor at Nova Southeastern University and a member of the retreat steering committee. “We need to look at other ways to resolve those disputes.” Scope of the Problem The deliberations and recommendations followed the attendees spending most of the first day getting information, hearing opinions, and expressing their own views about legal access issues. The retreat made use of an electronic system, purchased by the State Courts Administrator’s office several years ago with a Foundation grant, that allowed the participants to “vote” on various questions and issues with an instant tabulation. One question probed attendees’ attitudes about what was included in legal access. By overwhelming majorities, they said that included physical access, access to a lawyer, the right to legal services, legal representation — and adequate representation — when constitutionally mandated or otherwise needed, opportunities for informal resolution of a dispute, opportunities for self- representation, and education of the public about legal access and resources. By nearly a 2-1 margin, the group said access did not include giving those in need access to a nonlawyer for legal help, but by a 61-39 percent tally they said it did include providing assistance for citizens handling their own problems. The audience polling set a backdrop for the panel discussion in the first retreat session that covered a wide variety of access issues. Panel member and Miami attorney Lynn Washington, president of Legal Services of Greater Miami, said many lawyers automatically equate access with lawsuits. “We have to make a distinction between access to the courts and access to justice,” he said. “Lawyers think of access to justice as access to courts and litigation, but access to justice is more than going to court. Access to court may not be very important; access to justice is fundamental.” Another panelist, Bonnie Allen of the National Legal Aid & Defender Association, agreed. “The vast majority of problems for poor people, and probably all people, are resolved far short of the courtroom,” she said. “Information and advice is what people need. People are terrified of the legal system; they don’t understand it. The first step is an adequate information system [about legal access]; the second step is to provide forums for people to have actual access and advice.” Asked who was responsible for ensuring that people have access to the legal system, the participants said it was first a government and then a Bar responsibility. Private organizations and individuals had a lesser responsibility. State Rep. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, another member of the panel, said he hopes Florida follows Pennsylvania, which had a state Supreme Court commission appointed that included lawyers, clients, and others involved in the legal system to comprehensively study access issues. Goodlette and Sen. Burt Saunders, R-Naples, are cosponsoring a bill supported by the Bar that for the first time would allocate state funds for legal aid. Allen noted the national trend is for states to provide more funding, but Saunders cautioned that it may be difficult to get appropriations in Florida. “When you get in the legislative arena, you’re competing with a myriad of other needs and programs,” he said. And besides that, “it’s going to be a tight budget year.” He said the Bar does need to publicize better the 1.2-million hours its members donated last year to pro bono services for the poor. President Russell reported that Florida is one of only 11 states that do not help pay for legal aid programs, and he noted that with all of the present legal aid programs and Bar pro bono efforts, only about 20 percent of the legal needs of the poor are met. “It’s our fundamental responsibility as a unified Bar to provide access, but it’s also a social responsibility,” Russell said. “As citizens of Florida, as members of state agencies, as members of society, we must be able to provide to people of this state a means for resolving their problems. “Having exhausted everything else, we are coming to state government and knocking on the door. . . and saying, ‘Please help us find the money so our Civil Access to Justice Act will have a chance.’” The second session of the retreat, presented by Foundation Executive Director Jane Curran, looked at statistics relating to access issues. Curran reported that to qualify for legal aid, a family of four must have a monthly income no greater than $1,839 per month and that in Florida there are 1.17 million low-income households. And while retreat participants picked family law issues as the most prevalent brought to legal aid agencies, Curran said it’s actually housing or real estate related problems, followed by consumer or personal financial problems, and then family or domestic needs. Middle-income households, she said, are defined as those who make up to $72,000 per year, and 38 percent of those households have legal needs each year, or a total of about two million. Of those, only about 30 percent actually seek help, she said. Statistics also show that in family law cases from a study in six circuits, 48 percent of the petitioners were unrepresented by a lawyer, and in cases with children that percentage was 35 percent. In cases with children, respondents were unrepresented in 73 percent of the cases. Curran said the majority of pro se litigants in family law cases are low-income Floridians, and more and more courts are adopting the view that those parties are not problems but customers to be served. Different Solutions Finding creative ways to meet access needs was the subject of another segment of the retreat. Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Wells kicked off that section by reiterating that access means more than going to court. “Opening the courthouse door is not something that you do on the steps of the courthouse,” Wells said. “Opening the courthouse doors is something that has to be done in the community.. . . It’s an outreach program. “We have a fundamental burden here, and that is we have to educate the public, we have to educate the neighborhoods of a community that we all live in as to the importance of the courts and how they work,” he added. “Lawyers have got to be teachers, because part of our responsibility has to be explaining in our communities how this works. This [courts] is an integral part of their community life, whether these people know it or not.” Michael Faehner, a member of the YLD board and the retreat steering committee, made a presentation on a new website from the California court system. The goal of the site, he said, is to assist the approximately four-million people who represent themselves in that state’s court system. (The site can be found at www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp.) The site has a search engine, law library, and detailed information about small claims, family, traffic, juvenile, guardianship, and other topics commonly handled by pro se litigants, Faehner said. It also includes instructions on the court system, how to file papers, court fees and waivers, how to prepare for a hearing, and various legal forms. There’s specific information about the courts in each county, as well as statewide and local rules, Faehner said. He noted that California requires all court clerks to have websites and those are linked to the page. The site, which opened over the summer, also has a disclaimer that it does not provide legal advice, that information provided may be inaccurate or outdated, and that people visiting the site may need to consult with an attorney. It also may not matter what the legal community thinks about such efforts, Faehner said, adding, “If the state and the Bar don’t do this, then private interests will.” Other projects discussed at the retreat included: • The Community Counsel program of Bay Area Legal Services in Tampa. Marilyn Kershner, a staff attorney with the agency who oversees the project, said it recruits attorneys to offer pro bono service to non-legal projects that help the poor. So far, the program has been involved with a community development corporation, inner city redevelopment, a small business incubator, job training, a program that offers lower mortgage payments for people who help build their homes, a housing program for the disabled, and several more. • Environmental lawyer B. Suzi Ruhl talked about providing services to low-income communities as a whole, including dealing with environmental concerns. She noted that African Americans and low-income communities in general tend to have higher rates of various diseases and illnesses, as well as higher levels of environmental pollution. Successful efforts to address those ills have started at the community level and have gone to local governments, and then involving the legislature and other government agencies. Many times, Ruhl said, it’s not necessary to file a lawsuit, and improvements can be made by bringing all parties together. • Kent Spuhler, executive director of Florida Legal Services, Inc., recounted successfully pushing for reform of the car title loan industry, which, thanks to a special loophole granted in state law, was able to charge 264-percent interest. Legal Services was able to assemble a coalition — including the U.S. Navy which saw many sailors victimized — to try to close the loophole. He said multiple efforts, including lawsuits, lobbying the legislature, and working with local governments, were needed. He said a lawsuit was successful, but the title loan companies changed their corporate structure to avoid that. When the coalition was unable to overcome the industry’s lobbying in the legislature, it went to county commissions and got them to limit rates or ban the practice. Eventually, 41 counties passed local ordinances and the legislature then limited the interest rate to 30 percent. • Jacksonville attorney Deborah Schroth recounted a program, funded with a Foundation grant, that combines social workers, lawyers, and other professionals to address the problems of juveniles in the civil legal process. “The problem is the systems that are supposed to be helping these children aren’t doing it; they are dysfunctional,” she said, adding sometimes it takes a lawyer to sort through the problems. Programs like that can help kids in foster care who are assigned to inappropriate homes or who are identified as troublemakers in school but in reality need special education help. September 15, 2001 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Providing deposit stability in an uncertain rate environment

first_img 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,James Lutter D. James (Jim) Lutter is the Senior Vice President of Trading and Operations at PMA Financial Network and PMA Securities where he oversees PMA Funding, a service of both companies … Web: pmafunding.com Details Entering January 2016, there was a sense that the Federal Reserve (“Fed”) was beginning the process of returning interest rates to ‘normalcy’. Bankers began coordinating how to handle a rising rate environment, both from an asset and liability standpoint. Unfortunately, there are a large portion of bankers who have never experienced a rising rate environment during their professional careers. Furthermore, for seasoned bankers, a rising rate environment seemingly has become a distant memory. However, as we are now halfway through 2016, the excitement over rising rates has faded as the Fed looks to be destine to continue an ‘uncertain’ interest rate policy. The Fed’s effort to provide “transparency” has created layers of uncertainty in the market. Bankers are now tasked with trying to understand this rate environment and how it will affect deposit composition and funding strategies. If rates rise, deposit run-off could happen quicker than expected. If rates remain stagnant, they may be left overpaying for deposits.At the end of 2015, when it looked like the Fed was likely to put rates on an upward trajectory, financial institutions dusted off their old liquidity models. However, a decade of zero interest rates, unprecedented liquidity, economic uncertainty and regulatory reforms has rendered past models outdated. To further complicate this matter, the Fed has been unable to provide sustained rate increases due to the myriad of economic headwinds.Historically in a “traditional” rising rate environment, regional and money center financial institutions have moved in sync with rate increases because their deposit and loan structure is based off of a market index, such as LIBOR. Community financial institutions, on the other hand, tend to lag as they increase rates after the Fed moves. This typically causes a mismatch in the market, making regional and money center financial institutions more competitive in a rising rate environment and community financial institutions more competitive in a falling rate environment.The early 2016 rate movement played out differently this time. Money centers have accumulated a vast wealth of low-cost deposits during the last decade and view their current deposit base as inelastic toward marginal rate hikes. Community financial institutions acted more traditionally and gradually phased in higher rates. The inaction of larger financial institutions benefited smaller financial institutions, making their rates the de facto market rate.Overall, financial institutions are trying to provide stability to their balance sheets, understanding regulatory policy and normalize spreads – all in the face of anemic economic growth. Banks are cautiously monitoring to see if a rising rate environment is actually sustainable or a blip in the radar. This constant state of uncertainty is rendering “traditional” models obsolete. Financial institutions will look to leverage their unprecedented amount of core deposits as long as possible to provide stability.The Fed, along with financial institutions, continues to be inundated with a number of contrasting variables, making a clear path nonexistent. However, for financial institutions looking to maintain stability in their deposit portfolios in this uncertain rate environment, employing a market-based pricing model should be at the top of their list. By employing this strategy financial institutions of all sizes will be well positioned should a sustained upward rate environment occur.last_img read more

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Broome County Transit works to keep buses clean amid coronavirus

first_img“What we have done is elevated our cleaning protocol. We’re using a little bit more aggressive cleaning compounds for disinfecting,” said Kilmer. “We have standard protocols because the public transportation industry is used to dealing with concentrations of people. Certainly, COVID-19 has our attention,” said Broome County Public Transportation Commissioner Greg Kilmer. “We can keep our buses and our facilities really clean, we can constantly clean them, but we also need the public. If you’re sick, stay home, it’s better for you, it’s better for the rest of the people who don’t get cross-infected,” said Kilmer. Broome County Transit also says their buses were meant for a deep clean. While BC Transit continues to clean their buses daily, officials say they still need help from the public in preventing any illnesses from spreading. VESTAL (WBNG) — Broome County says they give more than two million rides annually, and with fears of the Coronavirus spreading, they’re working to keep buses extra clean. “They’re designed to minimize infection. We’ve got these special rubber floor surfaces that wrap around so we can mop them out,” said Kilmer. The buses also feature seats and handrails made of materials that are easy to wipe down. If you do find yourself on a public transportation bus, officials advice covering your sneezes and coughs, and be considerate of those around you.last_img read more

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