Welsh wonder – Ceri Jones

first_imgArriving home, aged 21, my dad managed to get me a trial at Newport and with Rod Snow banned at the time I was soon handed my debut, at The Gnoll against Neath propping against Andrew Millward. He’s a really awkward player to take on.Opportunities were limited in 2003 because of regional rugby, especially with guys like Rod Snow and Adrian Garvey at Newport, so I was lucky enough to move to Harlequins on loan. That went well enough for me to be offered a two-year contract.I’m still ambitious to add to my two Wales caps. I accept that playing outside the country hasn’t helped me and it was tempting to go back, but I’ve loved my time at Quins. When you’re enjoying yourself somewhere you tend to stay.It was incredible to see the reaction of the Harlequins fans when I played my last home game, against Saracens. It was humbling to receive a standing ovation when I went on and when I went off. Phenomenal, especially for a Welshman at a traditionally English club.The perfect club for me to join is Worcester. They’re a hugely ambitious club, a sleeping giant, and it also means I can move back and live in Wales. My son is four and his grandparents are really missing him. I’m delighted  to see Worcester promoted back to the Aviva Premiership and I can see the parallels from when Harlequins were relegated, then promoted.It was the making of Quins in many ways and we discovered a number of key players that season, including Nick Easter, Chris Robshaw and Jordan Turner-Hall. It stopped us getting too big for our boots afterwards.Did you know? Jones won both his Wales caps on the 2007 summer tour to Australia, off the bench at Sydney and starting at tighthead in Brisbane a week later. In the Aviva Premiership Double Header last September, Jones made his 200th Quins appearance.This article appeared in the July 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK Ceri Jones with his previous team HarlequinsQuick-Fire ProfileName Ceri Rhys JonesPosition PropAge 33 (19 June 1977)Born NewportIt was a question of when, not if, I started playing. My dad, Lyn, was a second-row with Ebbw Vale and Newport, but it was my mum, Claire, who did all the hard work when I was starting out. My dad was busy on the family farm so it was left to my mum to drive me to training and matches. I owe her a lot. Growing up near Usk, in South Wales, mini rugby wasn’t available, so at under-eights I started playing for Newport High School Old Boys.The farm did, however, become my other rugby pitch and there was plenty of time to play there with my father and brother, Gareth (who went on to play for UWIC and Usk).There always seemed to be a ball around. The only problem was that as the smallest I had to do all the throwing in! The position I settled into was hooker, although I was a little lighter – and quicker – in my junior days so was even picked in my first years at wing.Huge encouragement was given to me by a great sports teacher at my primary school called Byron Webster, and my dad never pushed me.When I met a careers officer at school I said I wanted to be a professional rugby player, but as the game hadn’t even turned professional they said, ‘Don’t be stupid, there’s no such thing as a professional rugby player’. As it turned out the game turned pro a few years later, so I like to think I had some foresight.The main reason I stayed at hooker for so long was Iestyn Thomas. With him around my opportunities at loosehead were restricted. I was playing in Pontypool & District sides, and the role of loosehead was taken by him while I played hooker alongside him.I grew up fast playing junior rugby in Wales. It was full-on, even at schoolboy level, and the boots used to fly and you’d get kicked in the shins. I look back and see how much I learnt.A big turning point for me was New Zealand. My dad met former All Blacks tourist Jock Ross while playing for the Classic Barbarians in Bermuda and he arranged for me to have a season Down Under. The trip really focused my mind. I played for Southern and was selected for the Canterbury U20s. We played New Zealand in one game, which was a real inspiration for me. When I came back I had a new determination to succeed. It made me realise I really had to step up. Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitcenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Give As You Live raises £5 million for charities

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Give As You LIve say thank you for helping to raise £5 million Give As You Live raises £5 million for charities  52 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img Howard Lake | 28 September 2014 | News Tagged with: affiliate marketing Digital Give as you Live Research / statistics Trading Charity shopping site Give As You Live has now raised over £5 million for charities. The milestone was reached on Friday 26 September.The site has partnered with over 3,500 retailers. Whenever anyone shops with one of these retailers via the site, they generate an affiliate commission which Give As You Live shares with the shopper’s favourite charity. The donation costs the donor nothing.Give As You Live passed the £3 million mark for charities in December 2012.last_img read more

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October Club seeks transformational charity project for £500k funding

first_img The October Club is looking for the next small charity to receive its annual £500,000 funding. The Club, founded in 1987 by a group of City workers, will only fund charities working on a transformational project.Originally set up in response to the plight of leukaemia sufferers, The October Club has held annual dinners ever since, raising over £10 million for charities. This has helped fund ground-breaking research, raising  awareness and enabling challenging expansion plans.This year, the 30th anniversary for The October Club, funds will be raised at a gala dinner at The Savoy attended by over four hundred senior City professionals, and a race day at Ascot in July.The substantial funding is raised at just two events each year.Does your charity qualify?The October Club has three clear rules for eligibility of charities:1. The Club funds small and growing charities with voluntary income of between £500,000 and £2 million per annum.2. The funding is for a transformational project based across several UK regions.3. The funds must be used within three years.The Club, run by its 25 committee members, is very clear that its goal is to help innovative fledgling charities achieve that next level. They apply extensive due diligence to make sure that the Club can have a significant impact on the chosen charity.Previous charity partnersHoneypot Children’s Charity in 2015 Auditory Verbal UK in 2014The Encephalitis Society in 2013 St Giles Trust in 2012  Tom Isaacs, co-founder of The Cure Parkinson’s Trust, the Club’s 2016 partners, said:“The October Club represents a unique and extraordinary opportunity for smaller charities with big ideas to realise their visions and make a significant impact on their chosen cause.Working with the October Club has been truly transformational for The Cure Parkinson’s Trust and has enabled us to commence a project which has the capacity to embrace the entire global Parkinson’s community to work together as a team. Finally, one of the most unusual products of our dealings with the October Club is the fun we’ve had and the friends we’ve made along the way.”Chairman of The October Club, Mark Pumfrey, said:“We are proud of the City’s ongoing commitment to supporting important causes such as the one promoted by The Cure Parkinson’s Trust. We are especially grateful of the enthusiasm and the commitment of the industry, both longstanding and new supporters, whose work and generosity allows us to continue this tradition of supporting extraordinary people and causes.”Application for the 2017 partnership is now open and you can download the form from The October Club.   Tagged with: Funding small charities AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis79  144 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis79 October Club seeks transformational charity project for £500k fundingcenter_img Advertisement Howard Lake | 19 January 2017 | News  143 total views,  3 views today About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Aviva Community Fund 2020 makes £250,000 a quarter available for small charity projects

first_imgHarrogate School of EnglishYorkshire-based charity Harrogate School of English are one of the groups to have benefitted in the past, having received funding for their ‘Tea and Talk’ initiative. The support from the Aviva Community Fund enabled them to hire space and resources to teach English to Syrian refugees, in a friendly and informal atmosphere over a cup of tea. Key dates21 January – 12 February: Aviva Community Fund open for applications. Causes can visit avivacommunityfund.co.uk to read the eligibility criteria and the application13 February – 3 March: Causes can prepare their crowdfunding project page4 March – 20 April: avivacommunityfund.co.uk cause crowdfunding pages go live and fundraising begins10 March: Employee giving goes live, and Aviva employees will have the opportunity to donate their allocation of funds to the participating causes22 April: Projects who do not reach their target will have the opportunity to rollover for the next quarterly cycle. Successful projects will be able to withdraw their funds and bring their ideas to life •  Financial capability and inclusion: Those giving people the tools to become more financially independentUnder the programme, for which it has teamed up with online fundraising platform, Crowdfunder, eligible causes submit their projects through the site with their fundraising target where they can inspire support from Aviva employees and the public.  Each of Aviva’s 16,000 UK employees will be allocated an ‘Employee Wallet’ with £60 in total, which will be split across each quarter of the programme. Employees can donate these funds directly to the participating causes that matter most to them and these will be added to the funds raised externally on the Crowdfunder platform.Jude Brooks, UK Head of Corporate Social Responsibility at Aviva, said;“We believe the small charities that make the most impact are the ones given the opportunity to innovate and test new ideas. That is why with our Aviva Community Fund programme, we are focusing not only on facilitating funding for small charities with genuinely forward-thinking ideas, but also sharing knowledge from Aviva’s people and building the capabilities of causes through training and coaching. Our ambition is to enable causes to become self-sustaining over the long term.“We are extremely proud of the impact the Aviva Community Fund has had on so many worthy causes in recent years, and are delighted to give our network of approximately 16,000 employees the chance to contribute directly the causes that matter to them most.” Aviva has today (21 January) unveiled the latest development of the Aviva Community Fund, which will see £250,000 per quarter available for small charity and community interest group projects, with Aviva employees deciding how the money is distributed.Applications for the new Aviva Community Fund 2020 are open from today until 23:59 on 11 February, and Aviva is calling on small charities and community interest groups with an annual turnover under £1 million to submit their community projects on Crowdfunder for the chance to gain up to £50,000 in funding.The Aviva Community Fund programme is being rolled out nationwide following a successful trial, and is focused on building the capabilities and skills of good causes to drive long-term sustainable success and help charities make a life-changing impact in their communities.Aviva is looking for projects in two key areas:•  Community resilience: Those tackling inequality and improving environments to build more connected, more resilient communities Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3  694 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3center_img Aviva Community Fund 2020 makes £250,000 a quarter available for small charity projects Melanie May | 21 January 2020 | News Other resourcesIn addition to the funding, Aviva is also offering a range of resources and skills via its Knowledge Library, including advice around risk management and networking, as well as templates and documents to build their capabilities in a range of areas. Causes can also connect with Aviva’s employees, who are given 21 hours volunteering leave each year, to offer a range of volunteering opportunities, as well as world-class coaching from a number of International Coaching Federation accredited mentors.  693 total views,  2 views today About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Musical youth get creative in Limerick

first_imgHousing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Email Population of Mid West region increased by more than 3,000 in past year WhatsApp Background image created by Osaba – Freepik.comYOUNG people will have an opportunity to record their own song at a new creative arts and music programme which will take place across Limerick City and County this summer.Limerick Youth Service (LYS) and Music Generation are teaming up to run a series of three-day workshops which are suitable for teenagers from 12 to 17 years of age.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The course will be an introduction to all aspects of the music industry, including instructions on songwriting and learning how to play musical instruments.Delivered by experienced musicians and youth workers, all levels from beginners to experienced musicians are welcome, and instruments will be provided if necessary.As well as having their song recorded teenagers will design the artwork for their own album cover.This programme costs €25 for the three days and will take place from 11am to 3pm.The tour dates for the programme are June 13 Newcastlewest Community Centre, Demense, Newcastlewest; June 19 Caherdavin Community Centre, Caherdavin; June 27 County Library, Dooradoyle; July 2 Limerick Youth Service, Lr. Glentworth St; July 4 Askeaton Community Centre, Askeaton; July 10 The Factory Southside Youth Space, Galvone; July 18 Youthreach, Main St, Hospital; July 24 Kilfinane Community Centre, Kilfinane.For more information or to reserve a space contact Amanda at 061-412444 or visit www.limerickyouthservice.com. Linkedin Is Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? Previous articleMedTech sector can thrive in region – Cook Medical event toldNext articleA touch of Shakespeare to LSAD fashion design Louise Harrisonhttp://www.limerickpost.ie center_img Limerick Youth Service Calling for Additional Investment in Youth Work Sector TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! TAGSartcreativeLimerick City and CountyLimerick Youth ServiceLYSmusicMusic Generation Print Limerick on Covid watch list NewsCommunityMusical youth get creative in LimerickBy Louise Harrison – June 6, 2018 699 Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

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Pandemic spurred Saravanan to actionNew doctor helped organize community stakeholders

first_img Twitter TAGS  Facebook Pinterest By Bob [email protected] Rohith Saravanan was an Odessa newcomer when the COVID-19 pandemic began creeping in and he saw the need for leadership. The 39-year-old chief medical officer at Odessa Regional Medical Center formed a community stakeholders group of 20 and helped generate a coordinated response. Now they’ve put an app on their “COVID in the Basin” website where citizens may check on testing, vaccines, treatments and other matters. “We needed to respond in a unified fashion, but each entity was responding on its own,” Saravanan said. “There was no coordination. So last March or April I called a meeting of people from the schools, the college and university, business leaders, the hospitals, the county and the city. “I gave them scientific information that they found a lot of value in and we had a unified front.” The app is updated weekly by Saravanan, his wife, Dr. Sara Amiri, and Venu Yankarla of Keystone IT Solutions. Saravanan is a native of Nagercoil in South India who earned degrees at McMaster University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, where his parents have settled, and St. George’s University Medical School in Grenada before doing research in facial and cranial surgery at Columbia University and clinical training at three hospitals in New York City. He is a family practice physician. He worked for 10 years in Buffalo, N.Y., and in May 2019 became chief medical officer at ORMC and Scenic Mountain Medical Center in Big Spring. He also has an executive MBA degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Saravanan and his wife, who is an internist and pediatric medicine specialist, have two children. His father was an accountant and his mom a teacher. His sister Arthy is a breast radiologist in Austin. “Medicine is a big passion of my mother’s,” he said. “She grew up in a household where all four of her brothers were in medical school and she wanted to help her kids pursue medicine. “My overall goal has always been to make a positive change in communities and to make sure hospitals are fully prepared with hospitalizations, intensive care units and ventilators. Second, I want to educate the community on how to prevent the spread and keep ourselves safe and healthy with good information and good leadership. “I love to teach, lead and achieve things together as a team,” Saravanan said. “Those are the things that keep you going from day to day.” He said times have changed in that patients are called on to take part in their care rather than just being told what to do by their doctors. “It has become more of a partnership,” Saravanan said. “It won’t last forever if a person receiving counsel from their physician doesn’t understand or buy what he is telling them. If they understand and follow through, then you have made a change for life. “It’s very important to have that buy-in so patients have ownership and are engaged with their doctors. There is so much more to life than taking medicines.” The Saravanans hike, bike, swim and travel widely and in the past five years they’ve made a series of charitable medical trips to Ghana and Sierra Leone. Their pleasure travels have been to India, Iran, the Caribbean and around the United States from Florida to Hawaii. They’ve hiked in the Hill Country, the Monahans Sandhills, Carlsbad Caverns, White Sands National Monument in New Mexico and in the Fort Davis area. “I enjoy studying cultures,” Saravanan said. “I worked at a refugees’ clinic in Buffalo and met Burmese, Somalis, Nepalis, Iraqis and Afghanis. It was good to realize what they had gone through and the struggles they’d had. “We hike in the mountains and explore rivers and waterfalls and we want to visit Oregon, Washington, Idaho, California, Utah and Colorado.” Another of the doctor’s enthusiasms is a variety of foods, particularly spicy ones, although he has yet to develop a taste for hot sauce. “I’m a huge foodie,” he said. “My favorite thing is a bazaar with recipes from different parts of the world like Africa, Asia, Australia and Canada. I like a lot of different flavors in my mouth.” Enjoying the Permian Basin’s warmer climate, Saravanan has been interested to learn about ranching, West Texas slang like “y’all and fixin’ to” and Texas barbecue. “We’re happy here,” he said. “We have always put down roots. The only challenging thing for us in this community is a lack of diversity in thought processes. I’d like to expose people to more things and give them a chance to experience what we have experienced.” ORMC President Stacey Brown said Saravanan “is a great leader and a greater physician. “I cannot imagine having gone through this pandemic without him on our team because he has been an incredible resource, not only for both hospitals but also for our community leaders,” Brown said. “He does a good job of putting things in terms that lay people can understand. “In an environment that was changing day by day and sometimes minute by minute, Rohith stood out as someone who was knowledgeable and trustworthy. He is not too busy to help anyone and he quickly rose to the top of our community.” Brown said Saravanan “is just a really good man from professional and personal standpoints.” “He cares about people and his life’s mission is to make the world a better place,” she said. “He and Sara spend their own money to go on mission trips to other countries.” Brown said Saravanan is a good leader “because he listens to make sure he understands the situation at hand and then he questions things. “He is data-driven,” Brown said. “He looks for the facts.” A stakeholder who joined Saravanan’s group was ECISD Superintendent Scott Muri. “Rohith is highly intelligent and knowledgeable in his field,” Muri said. “He develops a lot of trust and he won our confidence. He is a man of character and wisdom who makes compassionate decisions that are clearly in the best interest of families. His level of concern for our community made him a leader and he rose to the occasion. His impact was significant. “He is a man of integrity and great character who is so passionate about his work because he truly cares about people and their well-being.” Noting that he has gotten to know Saravanan personally, Muri said, “We still talk about what we’re doing as a school system and we listen closely to our medical community, including Dr. Timothy Benton (regional chairman and associate dean for clinical affairs at the Texas Tech Health Sciences Center)” he said. “Those two voices have been predominant. While the pandemic has kept most of us apart, it has also brought us together.”Bob Campbell is a reporter for the Odessa American covering Religion and Lifestyle in the Permian Basin.Odessa Regional Medical Center & Scenic Mountain Medical Center’s Chief Operating Officer Dr. Rohith Saravanan poses for photo Thursday at Odessa Regional Medical Center. Pandemic spurred Saravanan to actionNew doctor helped organize community stakeholders WhatsApp Twittercenter_img By Digital AIM Web Support – February 21, 2021 Facebook Local News Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleWashington shuts down California late for 62-51 victoryNext articleSam Burns holds his own on a tough, windy day at Riviera Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

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Troy Arts Council unveils schedule

first_img Email the author Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… The Marvelous Wonderettes are a cotton-candy colored, nonstop pop musical blast from the past. The ladies will perform on April 5.The Troy Arts Council doesn’t often toot its own horn but, with the unveiling Friday of its 2012-2013 performance season, it has every right to blow away.Dr. William Denison, TAC president, said this year’s calendar of events is one of the most outstanding ever.“The TAC’s 2012-2013 season offers something for everyone,” Denison said. “Everything is not for everyone but there is something for everyone. With such a versatile calendar, we expect to have great attendance at each performance.” Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Published 11:00 pm Friday, August 31, 2012 Print Article Skip Book Nook to reopen Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By The Penny Hoarder Marcy and Zina have long been known as the duo that writes quirky and original songs about love, the art of falling in and out of love, and the zany things that can happen on the dating scene. It is a show that young people will really enjoy along with all of those who are or ever have been in love, Denison said.The October 30, Sinatra Tribute is targeted for, but not limited to, the older generation.“This will be a fantastic performance,” Denison said. “It will take the audience back to the golden days of the Chairman of the Board, Frank Sinatra, and his classy swing style of music. Frank Sinatra’s unforgettable tunes and unmatched voice defined music for a generation.”The TAC’s annual Holiday Spectacular has become a Troy tradition. Shelia Jackson & Friends Christmas Concert (Nov. 30) is always one of the most highly attended calendar events. Troy Arts Council unveils schedule By Jaine Treadwell Sponsored Content Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits “Shelia always has a fantastic show” Denison show. “She has an incredible voice and she invites a host of local vocalists, dancers and musicians to join her for this holiday show, which is both a variety show and a holiday spectacular.”New to the season’s offerings will be a presentation of the History of the English Bible on Dec. 7.In January, the TAC will bring two musical performances to the stage. A Sunday matinee on Jan. 13 will feature world-class accordionist Alexandre Sevastian in concert. He has won four International Accordion Competitions and has toured as a soloist throughout Russia, Ukraine, Germany, Italy and Japan.“Then, on Jan. 28, the Merling Trio will come to town,” Denison said. “The trio is recognized as one of today’s premier ensembles. It is truly as international trio in that it brings together musicians from Polish, Japanese and Dutch backgrounds.”The Merling Trio is known for its remarkable gifts of communication, magnificent precision and an impeccable blend of sound. That is a combination that brings the audience to its feet in appreciation.When Spencer’s Theatre of Illusion comes to Troy on Feb. 12, the Claudia Crosby Theater just might be filled to capacity.“Spencer’s Theatre of Illusion is going to be one of our most popular events,” Denison said. “It’s going to be big. For the Spencers, magic is not merely about baffling the audience by doing something seemingly impossible. It’s about drama, spectacle, interaction, danger and personality.”Denison said the husband and wife duo can penetrate through walls and levitate with the best of them.“The Spencers don’t want the audience to just sit in their seats and watch, they invite audience participation,” he said. “They are called ‘Modern Day Houdinis’ and they live up to that name.”On April 5, another bang-bang performance by The Marvelous Wonderettes will excite and entertain the audience.The Marvelous Wonderettes are a cotton-candy colored, nonstop pop musical blast from the past.“The Wonderettes sing the favorite songs from the 1950s and ’60s,” Denison said. “They take you on a musical trip down memory lane.”The culminating event for the TAC’s 2012-2013 season will be TroyFest, a juried arts and crafts show held on the square in downtown Troy (April 27 & 28).Each year, TroyFest features many of the outstanding artists and craftsmen in the area along with non-stop entertainment, children’s’ activities and a corner to showcase the community.The art of local sculptor Walter Black, the Best of Show winner at TroyFest 2012, will be featured at the Johnson Center for the Arts during the month of April and at TroyFest.The Troy Arts Council was founded as a non-profit educational organization in 1972.Major funding for the TAC comes from its patrons who purchase season tickets annually and from the City of Troy. Troy University is an important in-kind sponsor that provides performance spaces and support staff.The TAC also receives donations from corporations, organizations and individuals as well as through grants awarded from the Alabama State Council on the Arts, SouthArts and the National Endowment for the Arts.Those who support the TAC by attending its calendar of events, not only benefit from outstanding stage performances at the Claudia Crosby Theater, they also help bring exciting professional performances in music, theater and dance to Troy and Pike County and support programs for Troy area schools in visual arts, music, drama and dance.Support of the TAC also helps provide student scholarships and assists community arts organizations with budgetary support and with TroyFest and the Film Festival.Patron support is extremely important if the TAC is to continue to offer the high quality performances for which it is known, Denison said. There are different levels of TAC Patrons’ memberships beginning at $75 with one season ticket. Each membership includes season tickets, depending on the level, but Patron memberships are the best ticket in town.To become a TAC Patron, call the TAC at 334-670-2288 or visit the TAC website at www.troyartscouncil.com. Latest Stories The mission of the TAC is to aid, encourage, advise and correlate activities that promote the cultural arts in Troy and Pike County and to integrate those activities into the total life of the area.“Each year, our season is planned in accordance with our mission and for the benefit of our extended community,” Denison said.“The TAC season features nine headline events beginning Sept. 22 with Broadway’s Marcy and Zina Show, which is a perfect catalyst for the new season because the duo is one of the most original voices in American musical theater today.” You Might Like Beauty in the ashes: A story of the Waldo Canyon Fire Dave and Melody Mead lost their home and all of their material possessions in the Waldo Canyon Fire. Melody Mead… read morelast_img read more

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Dozens seen driving past hit-and-run victim in middle of Los Angeles road

first_imgKABC(LOS ANGELES) — Newly released video shows dozens of vehicles driving around a pedestrian fatally struck by another car in Los Angeles before anyone stops to help.The hit-and-run appears to have happened during a street race, but no suspects have been arrested, according to the Los Angeles Police Department.The victim, 22-year-old Neri Ramires Chalo, is seen in the video getting out of his car and crossing the street around 10 p.m.Investigators said Chalo saw two white cars speeding in his direction and began to run. He dodged the first car but was struck by the second, and both drivers fled the scene.“The force of the collision propelled him down the roadway, at which point he came to rest,” said Josh Wade, a detective.Chalo was pronounced dead at the scene.The surveillance tape shows more than 30 cars passing by Chalo’s body, with several drivers slowing down or changing lanes.Detectives said they believe the two white cars were racing, reaching speeds of more than 60 mph in a 40 mph zone.The vehicle that struck Chalo may have been driven by Roberto Ocampo, police said. He has not yet been taken into custody.“These situations are tragic all the way around, and we can only urge Roberto to come forward and give a statement to us about the night of the accident,” Wade said.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Firms fail to train staff for disasters

first_imgFirms fail to train staff for disastersOn 3 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article UKemployers are not ready to react to potential terrorist attacks because theyput too much emphasis on preparing their IT systems and infrastructure ratherthan staff. Securityspecialists, speaking at the Survive 14th Annual International Conference inLondon last week, fear that there is a ‘massive failing’ in the ability ofsenior management across the UK to react effectively to a crisis.Asthe ‘terror cordon’ increases across London, speakers blamed an “it’s notgoing to happen to me syndrome” and claimed companies have not learnedlessons from September 11, which threw many businesses into a state ofconfusion.RobFountain, CEO of consultancy Survive, which specialises in business continuitymanagement, urged organisations to invest more time and money into trainingstaff to ensure they know how to react if disaster strikes.”Wedon’t have enough trained people at the right level with the right kind ofexperience in enough businesses and local authorities,” he said.”Alot of companies pay lip service to the idea of putting people first. The realbusiness of securing the true resilience of an organisation rests with theskills of the people and how they will react in the circumstances. We are fartoo focused on securing the data and the financial situation, and far toolittle concerned with the human aspect,” he added.Problemshighlighted at the conference included the under-funding of business continuitymanagement in the public sector, and excessive secrecy in the private sector. Speakerswarned companies to avoid the creation of ‘a culture of blame’ when rehearsingstaff for potential crises. ByMichael Millar Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Total expands regional headquarters in Singapore

first_imgTotal signed Heads of Agreement with Pavilion Energy in June 2018 to jointly develop a LNG bunker supply chain in Singapore Image: Total head quarters building in la Défense near Paris, France. Photo: Courtesy of Tangopaso/Wikipedia. Total announced today the launch of its new and expanded regional headquarters in Singapore, further affirming the company’s 37 years of presence in the country since 1982 and its continued investment in the local and regional energy sector. A key super hub for Total, the regional headquarters is pivotal in driving business growth and innovation as well as talent development in Singapore and Asia Pacific.Located at Frasers Tower along Cecil Street, Total’s expanded premises in Singapore occupies six floors with a combined office and work café space of more than 125,000 sq ft. It houses both Total’s Asia Pacific headquarters with 500 employees across six business divisions – Exploration & Production; Gas, Renewables & Power; Refining & Petrochemicals; Marketing & Services; Trading & Shipping, Marine Fuels Global Solutions, and Total Global Services, a shared service organization.“The inauguration of our new regional headquarters not only represents our next chapter of sustainable growth, but also reaffirms Total’s commitment to invest and develop in Singapore for the long-term. We look forward to continue working with the government, local institutions and our customers and partners to realize our ambition of becoming the responsible energy major,” said Christian Cabrol, President & CEO, Total Oil Asia Pacific/ Country Chair Singapore.Total’s new APAC headquarters is in line with its organizational ambition to realize One Total, One Country, by bringing all the entities under one roof. It aims to drive operational efficiencies, facilitate greater synergies and collaboration, accelerate innovation to offer holistic solutions to customers as well as providing a conducive working environment for talent development and growth.“We are pleased that Total has selected Singapore as its strategic hub for Asia, marking a milestone in our longstanding partnership. As Singapore works towards building a sustainable, smart energy future, we are committed to working closely with industry players such as Total to address growing energy demands and our climate change commitments.” said Teo Chee Hean, Senior Minister and Coordinating Minister for National Security, Singapore. Senior Minister Teo is also Total’s International Advisory Committee Member.“Our people are key in helping to achieve our ambition. We are driving the ‘One Total, Better Together’ initiative, to empower and help our talents build their careers; promote a management style that leverages our expertise and values, as well as creating a good place to work together. We also seek to strengthen dialogue and cooperation with the broader community through CSR Singapore Action Program under Total Foundation.” added Christian.To uplift at-risk youths, we partnered with Halogen Foundation, an NGO, to mentor 15-year old students in various neighbourhood schools, through its Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship program, thereby supporting Youth Inclusion & Education. In commemorating the Singapore Bicentennial, Total partnered with the French Embassy to support the Lee Kong Chian National History Museum of Singapore, and the Museum national d’Histoire naturelle of Paris, to create the book ‘Voyageurs, Explorateurs et Scientifiques: The French & Natural History in Singapore’ which highlights the works of French naturalists Diard and Duvaucel who accompanied Sir Stamford Raffles during his journey to Singapore 200 years ago. Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

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