Charge dismissed against professor

first_imgProsecutors dismissed a misdemeanor charge of battery against Stephen Smith, a Notre Dame law professor who was accused of assaulting his son, according to a report in the South Bend Tribune on Wednesday.Smith appeared in court last week, expecting to go to trial on the misdemeanor battery charge, when he learned prosecutors had dismissed the case, the Tribune reported.The case has been in progress for more than three years now. In June of 2011, prosecutors accused Smith of battering his wife, a Class D felony battery charge, the Tribune reported. Later, the state charged him with misdemeanor battery for allegedly fighting with his son when the then 23-year-old reportedly tried to intervene.Later, prosecutors charged Smith with two misdemeanor counts that accused him of violating a protective order which was in place after the allegations, according to the Tribune.In March, the prosecutors ran out of time to bring to trial the felony battery charge involving Smith’s wife, due to Indiana’s two-year statute of limitations. However, the Court of Appeals ordered that the misdemeanor battery charge regarding the alleged assault against his son would stand, the Tribune reported.The case was further delayed by a change in the judge overseeing the case and the son opposing a subpoena to come testify in Indiana, the Tribune reported.In May, a judge acquitted Smith of one of the two invasion of privacy charges he faced in connection with the alleged protective order violation, according to the Tribune.Smith is scheduled to appear in court Wednesday for the one invasion of privacy charge that remains.According to the Notre Dame Law website, Smith holds a bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College and a Juris Doctor from the University of Virginia. He came to Notre Dame in 2009 and teaches courses on criminal law, criminal adjudication and federal criminal law.Tags: professor, School of Law, Stephen Smith, triallast_img read more

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Media maven promotes black women’s representation in mainstream media

first_imgProducer, writer and director Issa Rae shared her transition “From Awkward Black Girl to Media Maven” in a titular lecture sponsored by the Multicultural Student Programs and Services in Carey Auditorium on Tuesday evening.Rae said her career began with a YouTube series she created while an undergraduate student at Stanford University.“I created my first web series my senior year of college, called ‘Dorm Diaries,’” Rae said. “It was a satirical diary about what it was like to be black at Stanford. I cast my friends and shared it on Facebook, and the school’s response was amazing. It even spread to schools like Duke, Harvard and Howard. I could not believe that I created a show that students around the country were relating to.”Following the conclusion of this first mini series and her college graduation, Rae said she moved to New York City in search of opportunities in the theatre and film industries. There, Rae said she felt disillusioned by the various media executives hindering her from the success she knew she was capable of.“I kept getting told to ‘Change this’ or ‘Wait’ or ‘Do this,’” Rae said. “It really forced me to take a step back and realize that a lot of these people — the gatekeepers — were just in my way, and I decided I would work to build my own projects.”Despite these initial setbacks, Rae said her desire to share stories with the world and change the racial dynamic of media outweighed her nerves.“I have always wanted to tell stories – about me, my friends, about people I can relate to — and that can be really easy to do, except there is a huge disconnect when it comes to race on television,” Rae said. “The desire to tell my own story is what, in part, made me want to get started as a writer.”Rae channeled this ambition into her second web series, “The Misadventures of an Awkward Black Girl.” She said she hoped that this venture would transform the way people see girls on television.“I will say that girls – New Girl, Two Broke Girls – they all have something in common, and that is that the universal term ‘girl’ is white,” Rae said. “In these successful series, the default girl is implied that she is white, and I really have a strong desire to change that.”Since launching “The Misadventures of an Awkward Black Girl,” Rae’s channel has earned over 20 million views and nearly 160,000 subscribers. Rae was also listed on Forbes 30 under 30 twice, including this year, and went on to work with stars such as Pharrell Williams, Tracey Edmonds and writer Shonda Rhimes.Moving forward, Rae said she hopes to help others to succeed in the media field. Recently, she launched ColorCreative.TV, which aims to help women and minorities looking to work in media.“Just last year I launched a platform called ColorCreative.TV for minority women,” Rae said. “The mission is to disrupt the traditional television process and change the landscape of television.”Tags: 30 under 30, ColorCreative.TV, Dorm Diaries, Forbes, race, The Misadventures of an Awkward Black Girl, YouTubelast_img read more

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ND student body president, vice president reflect on term to date and look forward to goals for remaining time in office

first_imgNow more than halfway through their term as student body president and vice president, seniors Bryan Ricketts and Nidia Ruelas are finding their time so far in office to be somewhat different from what they initially expected.“[Running for office], you do have to think, to believe you’re qualified to do it. But you also believe that what you believe in, and the goals and ideas that you have, are going to make the University better and make students’ lives better. And that is sort of what drives you,” Ricketts said. “I am a very different person than I was Apr. 1. … There’s no escaping the change that comes with the responsibilities and the interactions that you’re having.”Michael Yu | The Observer Ruelas also said her perspective has shifted during her tenure as vice president.“[I’ve] changed in the way that now I’m looking to be more perceptive and more analytical in thinking about, ‘okay, well what are the implications of this?’” she said. “It’s not just like, ‘just be friendly to everyone and hope everything will work out okay.’ And that’s a huge lesson in leadership and something that I’ve grown in.”Ricketts and Ruelas won the February election on a platform that focused on student identity and diversity, and with a slogan of “Leading with passion. Working towards unity. Celebrating identity.”Since taking office in April, Ricketts said he and Ruelas have achieved many of their original platform goals. One area they’ve particularly emphasized, he said, is working as a community to address the issue of sexual assault.In their platform, Ricketts and Ruelas stated their intention to “support all students, faculty, and staff in proactive efforts to take a stand against sexual assault” and to “continue the message of the ‘It’s On Us’ Campaign through initiatives that promote bystander intervention and encourage reporting and the use of counseling services.”Over the course of the semester, the administration has continued as planned with the ‘It’s On Us’ campaign originally launched by last year’s administration, and has also submitted a 30-page report on sexual assault – comprising interviews with students, staff and administrators, as well as a number of recommendations – to the University’s Board of Trustees.“‘It’s On Us’ and the sexual violence board report, I would definitely put up there at the top as something that we’ve worked very hard on, as something that we care a lot about as something that the students care a lot about,” Ricketts said.In addition to their initiatives on sexual assault, Ruelas said she and Ricketts have also followed through on another one of their campaign promises: the launch of Onward, an online forum for students to submit ideas and voice concerns over current issues on campus. Ricketts described Onward as the “fruit of months of conversations with administrators and faculty across the campus,” and said student government has already received useful input from students using the site, particularly concerning food services. He said, however, that in many ways Onward is still a work in progress.“I think where we have to go from here, and where we need to improve, is once the ideas are up [on Onward] and we’re working on implementation, how do we effectively structure them to demonstrate to students what a realistic timeline looks like?” he said. “When an idea comes up, there’s a significant period of investment of time and sometimes money into making that happen, so working on how we can be more transparent about that process I think is going to be the key next semester in terms of the success of Onward.”One objective from their platform that requires further attention, Ruelas said, is the promotion of initiatives regarding diversity and inclusion on campus. She said a November panel student government co-sponsored with the Diversity Council to kick off the ‘It’s Time ND’ campaign – a campaign to encourage dialogue on the issues of diversity and inclusion on campus – had fewer numbers of students in attendance than she hoped.“I think that that’s something that we were reevaluating afterward and we were like, you know what, we could have done more on this in the sense of really using the connections that we have with other students to gather feedback on what we could do better … and also hopefully improve the conversation so that its more representative of what students want to talk about,” Ruelas said.In addition to working to achieve the goals they outlined for their administration in the spring, Ricketts said he and Ruelas have also had to refocus their attention on several newly-emerging issues.In particular, Ricketts said, both academics and student services have surprised him as two of the more prominent issues during his time in office.“I think there’s been a stronger focus on academics than ever anticipated, because we realized the need for student voice in that area,” Ricketts said. “The other big one has been student services.“ … Whoever’s coming next, I think the best advice I could give them is that whatever you want to do, the little things that make student life better, they often aren’t what you think you’re going to be able to achieve.“You just get an opportunity, and you have to jump on it. That’s what happened with the concession stands, that’s what happened with the prices in the huddle. We saw an opening, we said okay, this is going to make student’s lives better — let’s go for it. It’s kind of hard to plan out what those things are going to be, it’s just more having the mentality of looking for ways that this is going to make students’ lives better.”Both Ruelas and Ricketts cited the enthusiasm and dedication of their department directors and staff as one of the major strengths of their administration.“You never know how it’s going to go when you’re coming in,” Ricketts said. “You do the best you can to pick a team. You think you’ve got the right people, but you don’t know until the rover hits the road, and they’ve done a fantastic job at meeting our goals and at meeting their goals.”Ruelas said other administration members have grown throughout the semester in their ability to work together as cohesive unit.“We definitely bounce things off of each other, especially major decisions. That’s critical,” Ruelas said. “And I think that we complement each other very well in terms of perspectives and personalities, too, I think. What’s the same is our vales, and that, I think, has also been super important.”Ricketts said the current administration has also learned from the work of previous administrations, particularly regarding student involvement in initiatives.“I think from previous administrations, we inherited the recognition that your initiatives and your goals are only successful insofar as they are student-centered and student-focused,” Ricketts said. “So recognizing that It’s On Us can’t be successful without students, by, you know, just us, recognizing that [student involvement] had to be a central principle of Onward, I think we inherited a lot of that.”And in turn, Ricketts said he wants to leave to future administrations a legacy of “respect and professionalism.”“I hope what we leave when we move on is some sort of respect and professionalism,” he said. “We’ve done our best to treat this as a professional office, as a professional job when we do our work — especially with administrators and with people outside — to treat it like we’re getting paid to do this job, to treat it with the utmost respect. And I hope that that displays not only how much we care about the issues, but how ready we are to engage on behalf of the student body.”Tags: Ricketts-Ruelas, Student government, student government in focuslast_img read more

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Senate discusses new Duncan Student Center

first_imgStudent senate met Wednesday evening to listen to a presentation by Brian Coughlin, associate vice president for student development, and Brian Fremeau, director of student activities facilities, on the Duncan Student Center in the Campus Crossroads project.The overall project, which began in Nov. 2014, is expected to be completed by August 2017 and will cost about $400 million dollars. The Duncan Student Center is on the west side of the stadium facing DeBartolo Hall and will house multifunctional spaces designed to satisfy various needs for the student body, Coughlin said.“[This project] is a huge undertaking by the university, to come up with a building or a concept that is roughly 800,000 square feet for the entire complex, for students to use. This is a revolutionary new idea in terms of how to use space on a college campus. Up until now, space has been defined by a single use,” Coughlin said. “We have this huge structure in the middle of our campus that we are using about ten times a year, how can we incorporate it more into day-to-day campus life, and how can we look at all the things the campus needs?”Coughlin cited DeBartolo Hall and Rolf’s Sports Recreation Center as examples of single-use spaces currently being utilized on campus.Fremau said the Duncan Center will supplement existing student spaces, but will not replace the LaFortune Student Center.“The big picture concept is that, once this building opens, there will be two student centers on campus. … Part of the experiences that could happen in each building will serve the daily student life,” Fremeau said.The first floor of the building will include a coffeehouse venue with a stage for small performances, multiple meeting rooms and study lounges, two casual restaurants, a welcome desk for visitors to campus, and an innovative study zone that offers space for students to collaborate, Fremau said.The second level will cater to graduate student needs, student publication offices, larger meeting rooms and a rock-climbing wall that will extend a few floors above. Levels three and four will cater to fitness and athletic needs with strength and cardio equipment along windowed-walls, a basketball court, and a ⅙ mile track, among personal fitness and activity studios, according to the floor plans provided to senate. Coughlin said the fifth floor will contain a new Career Center, which will include 40 interview rooms throughout the space, that may be converted into group study rooms when not in demand by the Career Center.“It is going to be one of the largest career centers in the country … It is also going to incorporate graduate career services and MBA career services in the same facility,” he said.The overarching architectural theme of the nine-story Duncan Student Center will be art deco, and will harken back to the history of the original football stadium, Coughlin said.Features of the building refer back to the football stadium, with marks corresponding to the yard-lines on the football field, and remnants of old stadium benches on the walls. He said the floors of the building stack upon themselves “like a wedding cake.” He said the sixth floor will serve purely mechanical needs.The seventh, eighth, and ninth levels of the Duncan Student Center will be hospitality levels that will cater to premium seating during football games, and will contain a ballroom that can hold up to 1,000 people and is double the size of the Morris Inn Ballroom. The ballroom will be used for hall events, career fairs and other large events.“I believe that this way of thinking about space is unique,” Coughlin said. “I’ve seen other universities go out and build premium seating for their stadiums, and all it is, is premium seating. … We’re going to go build premium seating for our stadium, but we’re going to do it in a way that takes student life, academics and art into consideration.” More information about the Campus Crossroads project can be found at crossroads.nd.edu.Tags: Campus Crossroads, duncan student center, Senatelast_img read more

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Notre Dame community remembers life of Michael Hemler

first_img“I think he’s probably — no, not probably — the single most impactful person that I’ve met at Notre Dame.”Professor Michael Hemler went above and beyond for his students, senior Trent McKinnon said, constantly ensuring he could offer his time to anyone who needed it during his 26 years as a finance professor in the Mendoza College of Business. Professor Hemler died unexpectedly Feb. 14 at the age of 64 due to natural causes.For students like McKinnon, Professor Hemler’s commitment to those he taught was profoundly impactful. In fact, McKinnon says his time as Professor Hemler’s teaching assistant (TA) has altered his career path.“He kind of changed the course of my life,” McKinnon said. “Now I’m going to go to graduate school to do a Ph.D. in finance because, you know, basically because of him. … I’m appreciative for everything that he gave me and everyone else.”The commitment Professor Hemler showed to his students during his time at the University was unmatched by others, Rick Mendenhall, the William and Cassie Daley professor of finance and chair of the finance department, said.“There’s a little common area on the third floor of Mendoza that’s just outside the faculty-staff lounge, and Mike could often be seen out there at a table talking to one or more of his students — just working through problems with them, talking to them about the course material,” Mendenhall said. “And on his syllabus — probably all of them, but the ones I remember, he says, ‘Please feel free to stop by anytime.’ And most of us don’t do that; most of us would rather have appointments, and so that was just the kind of teacher that Mike was. He was always available for his students.”One of the students Professor Hemler would stop to help was senior Brenna Moxley, who said Professor Hemler often extended his office hours to accommodate her, despite his heavy workload. Editor’s note: Moxley is a former sports writer for The Observer.“Whenever I would work on my finance homework he was almost always there because he had so many classes and he also taught graduate students,” Moxley said. “ … He would stop by my table and see if I was getting it. He would say, ‘Do you have any questions for me? I just want to check up on you.’ Just the fact that he wouldn’t walk by me if I was working on my homework, he always wanted to see if I understood it.”This attention gave Moxley the confidence she needed to continue with Professor Hemler’s introduction to finance class, she said.“I ended up doing poorly on my second exam of the semester,” she said. “It was right before the drop date, and so I ran into his office hours saying I think I needed to drop the course and that I would try again next semester. And he was so nice to me and just said that I didn’t need to do that, and I wasn’t going to fail his class and that he would work with me whenever I needed it so that I could earn my [business economics] minor.”Professor Hemler’s patience with his students was evident during every class, senior Owen Fitzgerald said.“He wanted to make sure everyone got it,” he said. “And another thing that I think made him different from almost any other teacher I’ve had is he would cold call people, which a lot of professors do — but he would give each student the opportunity to pass that cold call onto someone else, so that they wouldn’t be, I guess, out on a limb by themselves.”Professor Hemler’s willingness to help others extended beyond his students, Mendenhall said, as Professor Hemler took on anything that was asked of him, even if most faculty members did not consider the job desirable.“When I asked Mike if he would sit on a committee, [he would say] ‘Absolutely,’ and he’d ask questions about, ‘Okay, what’s the committee’s charge? Where do we go from here? What’s my role going to be?’” Mendenhall said. “Only questions that were explanatory, questions that he needed to have answers to do his job properly. … He never once complained about anything that I was asking him to do at the moment; he never once complained to me afterwards that something was too hard or maybe not what he should be doing, maybe something that someone else should be doing.”Executive vice president John Affleck-Graves, who served as the Department of Finance chair from 1997 to 2000, said Professor Hemler’s selfless nature made him a valuable member of the department.“Mike was a wonderful colleague and a personal friend,” Affleck-Graves said. “He was both an outstanding teacher and a mentor to younger faculty in the Department of Finance. I, along with all in the department, will miss him dearly.”Professor Hemler’s selflessness was also evident in his heavy courseload, Mendenhall said.“Mike taught more courses than the typical professor,” he said. “Mike was not as research-active as some of the faculty, and because of that, he felt he could teach more, he could take on more classes.”Fitzgerald said Professor Hemler was able to teach so many classes due to his ability to adjust his teaching style to fit any class level, including non-business majors.“He’d make it very approachable — even though he’s got his Ph.D. and however many years of experience of teaching the highest level of finance,” Fitzgerald said. “He came down to teach intro to kids who he knows probably aren’t going to take many finance classes afterwards because it was that important to him.”Senior Emily Vincent said she appreciated the fact that Professor Hemler imparted valuable life skills to all of his students.“It didn’t matter that for him it was comparatively simple concepts but for us, for specifically students not in the College of Business, he was always very patient in making sure we understood exactly how the principles were being applied to the problems and how to work through problems we hadn’t seen before,” Vincent said.Fitzgerald said there were “multiple times” when Professor Hemler would take time out of his lesson plan to answer students’ questions and then continue to explain his answers after class.“It didn’t make sense even after he took two or three minutes out of his planned class to try and explain it in the middle of the class,” Fitzgerald said. “So I’d spend two or three minutes afterwards and then he’d give a different perspective and say: ‘OK, what if you think about it this way?’ And all of a sudden it clicked. Or it didn’t, and then he gave me another one and that clicked.”Going the extra mile, McKinnon said, didn’t just apply to the time spent with students for Professor Hemler.“Of all the teachers that I had, he has done the most on top of the course stuff,” McKinnon said. “He would read, bring in and print articles almost every class about things related to finance then we would go over them for a little bit, then we would get back to the subject matter.”This extra enthusiasm stemmed from Professor Hemler’s passion for his subject, Vincent said.“It was clear that he was a professor that was really passionate about finance and not just about teaching students about how to pass the test but about showing them the real world application of finance and his experiences with that,” she said. “So he was really passionate about preparing us for the real world and what we could use finance for after we graduate and not just in the classroom.”Professor Hemler’s passion for his work was not only clear from his teaching style, but also from the state of his office, senior Paul Sweeney said.“His office, I thought, was exactly how I pictured an office to look like, I guess,” he said. “ … There’s just books and books and books, and papers and books and books and papers just piled up everywhere. And so that was nice. But it was always like, even though it was messy it was always welcoming, and he always wanted to sit down and talk. And after you were done with your question, or what you came for, he would always just want to get to know you.”Getting to know his students was obviously a priority for Professor Hemler, Moxley said.“He wasn’t just an average professor who didn’t know people’s names,” she said. “He learned everyone’s names and he really — it really meant a lot to me that even at a school as big as Notre Dame, with a professor who taught five classes at a time with probably 45 students in each class, that he would take the time out of his busy schedule to work with me, and I honestly couldn’t be more grateful to him for that.”The gratitude those in the Mendoza College of Business and the Department of Finance feel toward Professor Hemler was made clear by his posthumous emeritus status, which Mendenhall said Roger Huang, Dean of the Mendoza College of Business and one of Professor Hemler’s close friends, suggested after Professor Hemler’s death.“I think it’s a really appropriate title for Mike,” Mendenhall said. “ … I think it recognizes what Mike did for the department and the College. And it does that as well for his family.”Students who knew Professor Hemler particularly well knew that his family was the most important thing in his life, Sweeney said.If there was one thing besides his family and teaching that made Professor Hemler happiest, however, it was tennis, McKinnon said.“He loved playing tennis. That was a big thing to him,” he said. “He loved his family a lot. When I would have lunch or dinner with him to talk about stuff, he would mention, ‘My wife’s doing this, my daughters are doing this.’ … So, family above all else, that was his number one. Number two was his job and his students. And then, number three maybe was tennis.”The high priority Professor Hemler placed on making his students feel important to him, Moxley said, is going to be missed at Notre Dame.“This is a huge loss for our University … and I think his shoes are [going to] be a really big [pair] to fill for students to come,” she said. “Because I know he made me feel the most important that any professor at Notre Dame has made me feel.”Thanks to the effect Professor Hemler had on students such as McKinnon, though, his legacy as an educator will not be forgotten.“I know that his legacy at least will live on through me because I’m going to be going to graduate school, and if I get my Ph.D., when it finally gets awarded, I’ll definitely be thinking of him,” McKinnon said. “In life, there’s only so many points when you diverge. When you’re on a set path and then some event happens and then it just shifts you away from it to a different one. I think that only happens so many times in life. [Professor] Hemler was definitely one of those points in my time. … He changed my life, for the better, I’d say.”Tags: Department of Finance, finance, mendoza college of business, Michael Hemler, Professor deathlast_img read more

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Mercy Works program promotes solidarity with South Bend

first_imgWhile students are often involved with the Notre Dame community, fewer are immersed in the greater community surrounding the University: South Bend. Mercy Works, a collaboration between Campus Ministry and the Center for Social Concerns (CSC), is one opportunity for students to escape the Notre Dame bubble.Christian Santa Maria, assistant director for retreats and pilgrimages in Campus Ministry, said that Mercy Works offers students the ability to do faith-minded service that has a tangible effect on people near campus. One of the special things about the program, he said, is that it functions as a kind of window into problems that students may never have experienced firsthand before.“Maybe you don’t know much about, you know, people experiencing homelessness, or you don’t know much about juvenile detention centers or prisons,” Santa Maria said. “This could be a really great way to get your feet wet, and kind of explore what it is like to be part of this community.”Mercy Works is a month-long commitment, and new groups begin service at the start of each month during the academic year. Groups consist of two to five students and spend two to four hours volunteering each week at their assigned organization. Because the program is founded in community, each small group also meets once a week to reflect on service, and everyone involved in the program has a reflection dinner at the conclusion of the month.“Students will get a taste for the complexity of the issues that face us as Christians or Catholics today, and hopefully, they start asking deeper questions about their own spiritual life or about … a particular community or population that we’re working with,” he said. “And, in particular, how does faith invite them to ask these questions — not just about what they do, but who they are and who this is shaping them to be.”Mercy Works focuses on integration with the South Bend community and works primarily with local agencies, including Chiara Home, DePaul Academy, Dismas House, Healthwin, Logan Center and Our Lady of the Road/St. Peter Claver Catholic Worker. Any student interested in volunteering is invited to fill out the Google form on the Mercy Works webpage.While volunteering is an important part of the program, its initiative is not solely service, Santa Maria said.“What Mercy Works hopes to invite the students to do is to understand that it’s not just about being a service provider and a service recipient,” he said. “It asks the question, how do we belong to one another? And how does our faith, through service, allow us to understand the meaning of solidarity and what it means to be brothers and sisters with one another?”He said one student had been mentoring students for about three months when she came to him with a question. He said she was unsure, almost stuck in her service; she felt useless and did not know how to continue serving, because she believed it was not effective enough. Santa Maria said he encouraged her to just listen and not try so hard to solve problems, because listening fosters the community that Mercy Works tries to attain.“I think in a school that often promotes solving issues, one of the first steps we are to do is actually listen,” he said. “Mercy Works is not about solving. It’s about walking with. It’s about solidarity. It’s about kinship. It’s about recognizing our relationships with people in our community. The purpose of Mercy Works is to create a culture of encounter where solidarity can happen.”Tags: Campus Ministry, Center for Social Concerns, Mercy Workslast_img read more

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BAVO to hold Green Dot crash course

first_imgThe Belles Against Violence Office (BAVO) will host a Green Dot crash course session on Wednesday as part this week’s Green Dot Action Week programming.“Green Dot Action Week celebrates the impact Green Dot has had on our campus in the past ten years while also calling the Saint Mary’s community to action,” BAVO coordinator Liz Coulston said in an email. “Through Green Dot, we are sending the message that violence is not tolerated on our campus, and everyone in our community is expected to do their part to keep the campus safe.”The week aims to build community through events including a spa night and Wednesday’s crash course.“The biggest objective of the week is to share a little bit about Green Dot and how it helps strengthen our College community,” said Sarah Miesle, the sports information director, in an email.Miesle, who has led Green Dot training sessions for students as well as faculty and staff groups, will facilitate the event.The crash course session will differ from bystander trainings in its level of structure, to allow attendees to ask more questions and share more stories, Coulston said.“The crash course … is the only [event] of its kind this year, designed specifically for Green Dot Action Week,” Coulston said.Green Dot sessions occur in the forms of shorter overview sessions, which last less than an hour, and full bystander trainings, which last about five hours, Coulston said. Overviews are held several times throughout the year, depending on need and availability, but only one full bystander training will be held this year.“The biggest thing students can hope to learn at the crash course is that Green Dot is something that is super accessible to anyone and everyone,” she said.Green Dot actions don’t have to be attention-grabbing or dramatic, Miesle said.“It’s about being a good neighbor, a good friend and a good person. Because of that, Green Dot is something I truly believe in and hope that other people can believe in by attending these trainings,” Miesle said.Miesle said Green Dot is something that people should regularly think about. In her sessions, she compares it to studying for an exam — the content is practiced and considered so it can be properly applied.“We always hope that when someone comes to a Green Dot session of any type, they leave with a little more confidence in what it means to be a bystander and how they always have a way to help in any situation,” she said.The Green Dot crash course will take place in Spes Unica 134 at 7 p.m. No registration is required for this event. The full bystander training session will be held on Sunday Feb. 2, for which online registration is required.Tags: BAVO, Green Dot, Saint Mary’s 2015 valedictorian namedlast_img read more

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Dollar In High Demand

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN Stock Image.WASHGINTON – The United States Dollar is getting stronger.The dollar’s value around the world has surged, up 7-percent since hitting it’s lowest point of the year so far on March 9. That means it is viewed as the world’s safest and most stable currency.However, strong demand from other countries has created a liquidity crunch, or in other words, a dollar shortage.The federal reserve in turn is rolling out new loans with a growing number of central banks. Starting Monday, the reserve will let those loans, known as ‘dollar swaps’ take place with key central banks on a daily basis, not the usual weekly basis, until the end of April.last_img read more

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Look Out! Stacey Oristano, Annie Golden & Judy Gold Join Disaster!

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on April 11, 2014 View Comments Disaster! Annie Golden Related Shows Star Files Disaster!, the critically-acclaimed 1970s disaster movie musical now playing off-Broadway at the St. Luke’s Theatre, will welcome Stacey Oristano, Annie Golden and Judy Gold to the cast in the coming weeks. Oristano (Bunheads) will join the cast on January 13 as “Jackie” replacing Mary Birdsong. Golden (Orange is the New Black, Xanadue on Broadway) will replace Mary Testa as “Shirley” starting January 20. On February 10, Gold (The Judy Show – My Life as a Sitcom) will take over the role of “Shirley” from Golden.Directed and cowritten by Jack Plotnick and starring co-creator and co-writer Seth Rudetsky, Disaster! is set on a summer night in Manhattan in 1979 and follows a group of NYC A-listers who party at the grand opening of a floating casino/disco—  until disaster strikes. Earthquakes, tidal waves, infernos, killer bees, rats, sharks and piranhas all threaten the guests, who sing some of the biggest hits of the ‘70s, including “Hot Stuff,” “I Am Woman,” “Knock on Wood” and more.The cast of Disaster! also includes features Haven Burton, Paul Castree, Charity Dawson, Matt Farcher, Tom Riis Farrell, Robb Sapp, Jennifer Simard, Jonah Verdon, Sherz Aletaha, Saum Eskandani, and Maggie McDowell.Disaster! features costume design by Brian Hemesath, scenic and lighting design by Josh Iacovelli, sound design by Brett Rothstein and musical supervision by Steve Marzullo.last_img read more

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How Does Violet Star Sutton Foster Prep For B’way? By Riding the Bus!

first_img Violet Sutton Foster is doing some serious research for her new role in Broadway’s Violet—no, she’s not dyeing her hair purple. She’s riding the New York City bus! The Tony winner knows a thing or two about prepping for Broadway roles, and she’s taking her newest gig very seriously. Foster hit the road to study up on her new character, a young woman who journeys by bus from her farm in Spruce Pine, North Carolina, to Tulsa, Oklahoma, in hopes that a televangelist will heal the scar on her face. Foster posted this adorable photo of her bus-riding adventures on her Instagram—what happened next, Sutton? Did you make it to your destination safe and sound? Check out this Hot Shot of Foster prepping for the stage, then see her in Violet, beginning March 28 at the American Airlines Theatre! Sutton Foster Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 10, 2014 View Comments Star Fileslast_img read more

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