Welsh wonder – Ceri Jones

first_imgArriving home, aged 21, my dad managed to get me a trial at Newport and with Rod Snow banned at the time I was soon handed my debut, at The Gnoll against Neath propping against Andrew Millward. He’s a really awkward player to take on.Opportunities were limited in 2003 because of regional rugby, especially with guys like Rod Snow and Adrian Garvey at Newport, so I was lucky enough to move to Harlequins on loan. That went well enough for me to be offered a two-year contract.I’m still ambitious to add to my two Wales caps. I accept that playing outside the country hasn’t helped me and it was tempting to go back, but I’ve loved my time at Quins. When you’re enjoying yourself somewhere you tend to stay.It was incredible to see the reaction of the Harlequins fans when I played my last home game, against Saracens. It was humbling to receive a standing ovation when I went on and when I went off. Phenomenal, especially for a Welshman at a traditionally English club.The perfect club for me to join is Worcester. They’re a hugely ambitious club, a sleeping giant, and it also means I can move back and live in Wales. My son is four and his grandparents are really missing him. I’m delighted  to see Worcester promoted back to the Aviva Premiership and I can see the parallels from when Harlequins were relegated, then promoted.It was the making of Quins in many ways and we discovered a number of key players that season, including Nick Easter, Chris Robshaw and Jordan Turner-Hall. It stopped us getting too big for our boots afterwards.Did you know? Jones won both his Wales caps on the 2007 summer tour to Australia, off the bench at Sydney and starting at tighthead in Brisbane a week later. In the Aviva Premiership Double Header last September, Jones made his 200th Quins appearance.This article appeared in the July 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK Ceri Jones with his previous team HarlequinsQuick-Fire ProfileName Ceri Rhys JonesPosition PropAge 33 (19 June 1977)Born NewportIt was a question of when, not if, I started playing. My dad, Lyn, was a second-row with Ebbw Vale and Newport, but it was my mum, Claire, who did all the hard work when I was starting out. My dad was busy on the family farm so it was left to my mum to drive me to training and matches. I owe her a lot. Growing up near Usk, in South Wales, mini rugby wasn’t available, so at under-eights I started playing for Newport High School Old Boys.The farm did, however, become my other rugby pitch and there was plenty of time to play there with my father and brother, Gareth (who went on to play for UWIC and Usk).There always seemed to be a ball around. The only problem was that as the smallest I had to do all the throwing in! The position I settled into was hooker, although I was a little lighter – and quicker – in my junior days so was even picked in my first years at wing.Huge encouragement was given to me by a great sports teacher at my primary school called Byron Webster, and my dad never pushed me.When I met a careers officer at school I said I wanted to be a professional rugby player, but as the game hadn’t even turned professional they said, ‘Don’t be stupid, there’s no such thing as a professional rugby player’. As it turned out the game turned pro a few years later, so I like to think I had some foresight.The main reason I stayed at hooker for so long was Iestyn Thomas. With him around my opportunities at loosehead were restricted. I was playing in Pontypool & District sides, and the role of loosehead was taken by him while I played hooker alongside him.I grew up fast playing junior rugby in Wales. It was full-on, even at schoolboy level, and the boots used to fly and you’d get kicked in the shins. I look back and see how much I learnt.A big turning point for me was New Zealand. My dad met former All Blacks tourist Jock Ross while playing for the Classic Barbarians in Bermuda and he arranged for me to have a season Down Under. The trip really focused my mind. I played for Southern and was selected for the Canterbury U20s. We played New Zealand in one game, which was a real inspiration for me. When I came back I had a new determination to succeed. It made me realise I really had to step up. Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitcenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Read More »

Samoa are out to upset the big boys

Samoan Captain Mahonri Schwalger leads the Siva Tau upon their arrival in Auckland, ahead of the World CupIn 2007, Samoa fell below their usual high standards at the World Cup, but they’re back four years later with a squad capable of making the knockout stages, writes Paul Morgan.Defeats to England and South Africa in 2007 were understandable but a 19-15 loss to Tonga left them having to qualify for this year’s event.The Samoa side that is out in New Zealand is light years away from the team that failed in France, and with the big Samoan population in the country they’re likely to be one of the best-supported nations.For a country with a population smaller (183,000) than Northampton, Samoa’s ability to produce world-class players is incredible. “It’s our national sport and there’s a field in every village,” explains Kubota Spears centre Seilala Mapusua, “and while they’re not all the regulation size with lines painted perfectly, like they are in the UK, it shows how much we love the game.“There are a lot of big guys and they like a lot of contact. I’d probably be more worried playing in Samoa than I’d be in England. The hits do seem to be harder! They also love it when guys who are playing overseas play on the island.”Once again the squad is full of players from the top leagues around the world, including Dan Leo, David Lemi, Eliota Fuimaono-Sapolu, Sailosi Tagicakibau and, Alesana Tuilagi from the Aviva Premiership. They’re also buoyed by one of the best results in their history this summer – a sensational 32-23 win against Australia in Sydney – and the opening of a high-performance facility in Faleata, funded by the IRB and Samoan government.All in all, plenty to think about for Samoa’s Pool D opponents.This article appeared in the October 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 01: Manu Samoa Captain Mahonri Schwalger leads members of the Samoan IRB Rugby World Cup 2011 team in the Haka upon their arrival at Auckland International Airport on September 1, 2011 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Sandra Mu/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit read more

Read More »

World Cup Final – The Verdict

first_imgTHE BAD1. The goalkickingPiri Weepu may have been the hero two weeks ago against Argentina, but he faltered against Australia and completely combusted against France with some awful attempts at goal. That ‘Keep Calm, Piri’s On’ T-shirt might well be changed to ‘Keep Calm, Piri’s Off’ now and had New Zealand lost this match he would have been advised to leave the country sharpish having missed eight points.Set play: Tony Woodcock scored New Zealand’s try from a lineout move2. The attacking gameThere was little of the flair for which both these teams are famed, and while that’s to be expected in a final it was disappointing. Both defences stood firm and when the teams could string phases together (France managed more of this than New Zealand) it was more side to side than forward thrusts. Francois Trinh-Duc made one lovely, mazy run and Israel Dagg probed every now and then, but there was none of the edge-of-your-seat attacking moves that both these teams are capable of. A shame for both the viewers in the stadium and around the world.THE UGLY1. The refereeingThere was a real lack of consistency in Craig Joubert’s decisions and he didn’t seem to have the courage to make the big calls, often opting for free-kicks rather than penalties, allowing breakdowns to become a free for all. The officials also missed Richie McCaw’s knee striking Morgan Parra’s face – and it’ll be interested to see if he’s cited now. Not that it matters. Even if he’s banned, he won’t miss any games for the New Zealanders don’t play again until 2012.2. The ending It looked like we were about to have a repeat of Munster’s Heineken Cup win in 2008 as the All Blacks  strived to pick-and-go for a few minutes. Luckily the tedium was broken slightly when they were awarded a penalty and went for the lineout. It was a boring and uninspiring end to a World Cup final, a stage that deserves better.Well done New Zealand. The All Blacks deserved to win because they have been the best side in the world for several years now, but it’s a shame that the rugby didn’t live up to the occasion. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img We’ve done it! New Zealand celebrate lifting the Webb Ellis Cup for the first time since 1987By Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features Editor at Eden ParkNEW ZEALAND’S wait is over. They are world champions once again and Richie McCaw is the first All Black to lift the Webb Ellis Cup in 24 years. But they didn’t take the easy route to glory – beating France by the narrowest of margins, 8-7, thanks to a determined defence.For all the questions marks over the French psyche, they turned up at Eden Park and put in their best performance of the tournament, a committed and powerful effort that prevented the All Blacks from finding their natural rhythm. In the second half Les Bleus dominated for long periods and once they scored a try you sensed that they would fancy their chances of a drop-goal to snatch an incredible win, but New Zealand did enough to hold off that threat with a gritty performance that ended a nation’s heartache.So what’s the verdict on the final?THE GOOD1. The openingEveryone was hyped up for the haka but the French stole their thunder somewhat. First they held hands in an arrowhead formation before marching forward as one and forming a solid line just metres from the All Blacks. It was a brilliant response and one they should be applauded for. Instead, they’ll no doubt be fined by the IRB for crossing the 10m line! What was better from France is that they backed up that opening on the pitch.Magnifique: Thierry Dusautoir2. The back rowsThierry Dusautoir was immense for France, his work-rate absolutely incredible in defence and attack, and he defined himself as an inspiring leader. Imanol Harinordoquy was the same. Jerome Kaino continued his fine work that we’ve seen throughout the tournament and Kieran Read stood out. Richie McCaw dirtied his copybook with the Morgan Parra incident but it was still a darn good performance for a man playing on one leg.3. Stephen DonaldAs yet another All Black fly-haf went down, Bath’s new signing was called into action and he steadied the ship. He calmly slotted a crucial three points at the start of the second half, defended extremely well and kicked intelligently, relieving pressure and making good territorial gains.last_img read more

Read More »

Lions 2013: 5 Things we learned from Lions v Western Force

first_img Still got it: Brian O’Driscoll shows a turn of pace for his first try against the Western Force in a 69-17 winBy Paul WilliamsA very different win to Hong KongTHE BRITISH and Irish Lions secured an all-too easy win against the Western Force – scoring nine tries in a 69 -17 drubbing. They dominated all of the core areas of the game – securing 57% of possession and 56% territory. The Lions had a satisfactory scrummage and a functioning lineout – running at 88.9% and 75% respectively. However, the win against the Force was very different to the victory against the Barbarians. This was less about set-piece and all about ball carrying. The Lion’s strike runners made colossal yardage in Perth. Jamie Heaslip, Sean O’Brien, Tommy Bowe, George North and Mako Vunipola owned the gainline – it’s also worth mentioning that all of the Lions’ ball carriers benefitted from the exacting handling of Jonathan Sexton.Heaslip and O’Brien made significant gains in the wider channels – particularly when running a line on Sexton’s shoulders. Tommy Bowe and George North powered through the central channels, especially from first phase ball where both regularly chose to turn in off their wings, and Mako Vunipola made a significant contribution as Cian Healy’s replacement. As with the victory in Hong Kong this result needs to be taken in perspective. The Western Force selected a massively weakened squad. Their team selection was straight from the book of ‘Rugby Homeopathy’ – diluted to an unrecognisable state and largely ineffective.Go forward: Mako Vunipola impressed replacing Cian HealyA new backrow. A new approach.The Lions backrow were highly effective against the Western Force – particularly Jamie Heaslip and Sean O’Brien. Heaslip was the Lion’s top ball carrier, he beat the most defenders and made the most clean breaks – he was also the team’s top tackler with 13.  Sean O’Brien also made a major impression on the opposition’s defensive line. O’Brien made a series of powerful, upright carries through the central channels and executed a valuable array of simple passes – a positive of his upright running style is that his hands and body angle are often shaped to pass.The performance of ‘Tuesday’s’ backrow presents Gatland with a difficult decision. The back-rows that featured against the Barbarians and the Western force were equally effective, but very different in execution. Tom Croft, Heaslip and O’Brien are an out and out ball carrying unit, with less emphasis on ground work. Whereas Toby Faletau, Dan Lydiate and Justin Tipuric arguably offered a balance between groundwork, defence and carrying – but less as all-out ball carriers. Picking the Lions’ test backrow will be Gatland’s most difficult decision.Halfpenny, the Lions test kickerLeigh Halfpenny’s kicking display in Perth was truly remarkable – 100% with 11 from 11. Halfpenny’s kicking stats may lead you to believe that he poked a series of simple 25 yards kicks from in front of the posts – he didn’t. Whilst five of his kicks were situated roughly in front of the posts, he faced another six very much from the touchlines – three from the left and three from right. What makes his display even more impressive was the execution of the kicks. There were no sweeping slices or raking hooks that started outside the posts and drifted back in – they were all straight ball flights from the moment the ball left his boot. Some of the Lions’ impressive performances in Perth need to be judged against the quality of the opponents – Halfpenny’s doesn’t. Goal kicking is a one man show, unaffected by the quality of the opposition – at the moment Leigh halfpenny is running that show. Set piece stable but nothing moreNothing will have concerned Warren Gatland about the Lions performance in Perth. But the set piece won’t have pleased him either – particularly the scrum. Whilst the scrum was competent, it was nothing more. You would have expected a front row of Dan Cole, Rory Best and Cian Healy to create more than merely stability in the scrum – particularly against a weakened Western Force front row.Another mild area of concern would have been the occasional miscommunication at the base of the scrum. A fast, clean No 8/No 9 pickup is a valuable weapon in the opposition’s 22, particularly on the blindside where it can create a momentary overlap. Whilst the Lion’s scrum in Perth won’t exactly be keeping Warren Gatland awake at night, it won’t be keeping Robbie Deans awake either.Precision: Leigh Halfpenny kicked a perfect 11 out of 11Western Force made a big mistake.Many have suggested that the Western Force’s decision to select a weakened team has undermined the Lions. In reality the Force have undermined no-one but themselves. Until this week most casual rugby fans in the UK wouldn’t have heard of the Western Force, let alone seen them play – the Western Force struggle to get noticed in their own country. PERTH, AUSTRALIA – JUNE 05: Leigh Halfpenny of the Lions lines up a kick during the tour match between the Western Force and the British & Irish Lions at Patersons Stadium on June 5, 2013 in Perth, Australia. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This was their chance to show the world who they are and an opportunity to expose their brand to a wider market. Instead they chose to rest the majority of their players for Sunday’s game against the Waratahs – in a competition, which let’s not forget, they lie bottom of their conference, third from bottom in the overall table, won’t qualify for the playoffs and from a competition they can’t be relegated. The next opportunity to play the Lions comes around in twelve years’ time. Talk about missed opportunity…last_img read more

Read More »

Behind the Dragon – an enthralling history of Welsh rugby

first_img Behind the Dragon – an enthralling history of Welsh rugbyPolaris Publishing was only established in 2011 but already it has built up a substantial rugby catalogue. At its heart is the ‘Behind the’ series in which a country’s rugby history is told predominantly through the words of the players who wore the national shirt.Surprisingly perhaps, given their fervour for the sport, Wales are the last of the four home nations to feature in the series. It’s been worth the wait, however, as Behind the Dragon emulates the excellence of the works on England, Scotland, Ireland, New Zealand and the Lions. The South Africa version, Our Blood is Green, is due out in September.BUY NOW with Amazon Guiding the Welsh ship is Ross Harries, best known as a TV presenter for Scrum V and the Guinness Pro14 but also a highly accomplished writer. He sets the context beautifully for each chapter, initially focusing on the early decades when Wales recovered from the shock of a debut-Test shellacking by England in 1881 – 0-82 by today’s scoring system – to launch the first of their Golden Eras at the start of the 20th century.Author: Ross Harries, here in his presenter role for Premier Sports, has pulled the book together (Inpho)Gwyn Nicholls, part of the innovative Cardiff team of that period, says that trying to stop his fellow centre Arthur Gould was “as difficult as trying to catch a butterfly in flight with a hat-pin”. Gould was Welsh rugby’s first celebrity and we learn of the greats that followed, men like Viv Jenkins, Wilf Wooller, Haydn Tanner and Cliff Jones.Rowe Harding, another famous Welshman who toured with the 1924 Lions, is one of the first to take a pop at the snobby approach to professionalism that pervades much of rugby history. “The whole attitude towards amateurism is hopelessly illogical. Every amateur who is not a fool or a genius has his price,” says the late winger.2019 glory: Alun Wyn Jones and team-mates celebrate Wales’ fourth Grand Slam this century (Getty)Examples of pernicious pettiness litter the book but here are just a couple.Ossie Male was ejected from a train carrying the Wales team towards Paris in 1924. His crime? He had unwittingly broken a WRU by-law stating that no player could take part in a match within six days of an International. Male had played for Cardiff five days before the Test because he needed match fitness having been sidelined by injury.Flake news: Just gimme what she’s having! (Inpho)Fast-forward to the Seventies and little had changed. The Wales players would go to the cinema on the eve of a match. “Gerry Lewis was the old mother hen and he’d get the ice-cream order in,” explains Phil Bennett. “Twenty-four ice creams. And Geoff Wheel would pipe up, ‘Any chance of a flake?’ ‘No, no, Bill Clement (WRU secretary) said no flakes.’ They were too mean to give us a bloody flake.”If the WRU takes a pounding, so do the national selectors. The chopping and changing was such that in the 21 Tests between the end of World War One and March 1924, Wales used 99 players. The joke was that you would be picked one month and attend a past players’ reunion the next.Fly-half Bennett, one of the most vocal critics featured in the book, says that after a four-minute cameo on his debut when he didn’t touch the ball, he was picked on the wing against the 1970 Springboks – a position he hadn’t played since he was 11.“I pointed that out to the selectors, who brushed it aside, saying I was a good enough footballer to cope. Those were the days when wingers threw the ball into the lineout and I didn’t have the faintest idea what I was doing. After a disastrous practice session with Delme Thomas where I tried underarm, overarm and everything in between, the big man looked at me in exasperation and said, ‘Phil bach, just lob the thing in and may the best man win!’”Centre stage: skipper Phil Bennett, holding the ball, with the Wales team that faced France in 1977 (Getty)Later, another notable Welsh No 10, Gareth Davies, was warned that the Wales XV to face England would be announced with ‘AN Other’ at fly-half as the selectors wanted to keep their options open, effectively using an upcoming Cardiff-Swansea game as a trial.Davies, as the incumbent and a man who had served his country with distinction, was so put out that he told the WRU he would quit if the team was released with the question mark at ten. The union went ahead and did it anyway and Davies, having outplayed his rival Malcolm Dacey in the Cardiff-Swansea match, duly kept his word – even after the WRU came back to him cap in hand asking him to reconsider.The content on the sensational Seventies will absorb rugby fans of any nationality. From Gareth Edwards’s incredible solo try against the Scots, when he finished caked in red shale, to Bennett’s breathtaking team effort at Murrayfield, Wales played mesmerizing rugby that even the modern-day Grand Slam sides forged by Warren Gatland can’t get close to.Above the rest: No 8 Mervyn Davies, one of the rugby greats, wins lineout ball for Wales (INA/Getty)The forwards’ part in those glory years is sometimes overlooked, although not by the backs of that time. JJ Williams says of the legendary Pontypool front row: “The three of them had a sinister aura. They were ruthless killers on the field. When you looked across the dressing room at those three, you knew that if trouble broke out on the pitch, they’d be the ones dishing out the punishment.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Smile please: captain Ieuan Evans with his Wales team during the 1993 Five Nations (Getty Images) Barry John, who expresses his regret at retiring so young because of the “relentless, cloying attention”, owns just one piece of memorabilia: a Grogg of the 1971 Grand Slam front row of Denzel Williams, Jeff Young and Barry Llewelyn.The class and consistency of those sides gave way to the chaos of the Eighties, when Wales fell a long way off their pedestal. They had been robbed of victory against the All Blacks in 1978, but a decade later in three meetings across 1987-88 lost the try count by 26-2.The traditional style of rugby, with forwards running the width of the pitch following the ball, had become outdated and, despite a third-place finish at the inaugural World Cup, Wales remained in disarray for years as players jumped ship to rugby league and coaches came and went in a managerial merry-go-round.The nadir was probably a 70-point hiding by NSW and a brawl among Wales players at the post-match dinner that followed a thrashing by Australia.The chapter on Wales’ 1986 summer tour, when they beat Fiji, Tonga and Samoa, is one you will probably read open-mouthed. The match violence and primitive conditions in Tonga at the time were so far off the scale that if it happened today the South Pacific nation would surely incur a lengthy ban. Different times indeed.Rose cutter: Adrian Hadley, left, helps stop Jon Webb during the 1987 World Cup quarter-final (AFP/Getty)And so eventually to professionalism, with the arrival of the Great Redeemer, Graham Henry, and the false dawns that preceded a long-awaited Grand Slam in 2005. Harries flew to Dublin to chat to Mike Ruddock, the coach of that 2005 team who resigned less than a year later amid more political turmoil and accusations that his role in the Slam was overstated.You can imagine the winks with which Ruddock told Harries: “People say I’m a lucky coach. I am a lucky coach. It’s extraordinary how lucky I’ve been.“I won two championships with Blaina, and got the post-war try-scoring record in Cross Keys. Swansea were second from bottom when I took over, and I was very lucky to win the league with them the next year.“Two years later, we won it again, and won the Welsh Cup in between. We beat Australia when they were world champions. I was lucky enough to win the Irish interprovincial title with Leinster. I’ve finished top of the league four times out of seven attempts in the All Ireland League where you suffer a massive turnover of players. I’ve been lucky many times.”Lucky charm: Mike Ruddock, right, raises the Six Nations trophy in 2005. A year later he was gone (Getty)Moving into the current decade, Sam Warburton is particularly fascinating on overcoming self-doubt and the chapter on the 2011 World Cup, when his controversial red card realistically cost Wales victory over France in the semi-final, is another belter.Warburton reveals how he expected to be vilified, in a similar manner to the treatment meted out to David Beckham in the 1998 FIFA World Cup, but for one of the few times in his life he was wrong. The disciplinary hearing the next day was walking distance from the team hotel down a busy street lined with bars and outdoor cafés.“I was dreading the reception I was going to get,” Warburton says. “Within minutes, someone clocked me and Gats, and I braced myself for a barrage of abuse. The bloke stood up and started clapping. Others soon followed suit and it set off a Mexican wave of applause. I’d been sent off in a World Cup semi-final, yet here I was getting a standing ovation on the streets of Auckland. I was overwhelmed with emotion. I’ll never forget that.”Pivotal moment: the tackle by Sam Warburton on Vincent Clerc that saw him sent off at RWC 2011 (Getty)A final extract is worthy of reproduction here. One player admits that Welsh people are brought up to hate the English. Instilled racial hatred does not belong in modern society, so it’s refreshing to hear Dan Biggar go against the grain when discussing the country in which he now plays his club rugby.“Ninety-nine per cent of our fans will tell you that beating England means everything. I don’t see it like that,” says the Saints fly-half. “Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy beating them, but if you offered me one victory against the All Blacks in return for losing every match against England for the rest of my career, I’d take it. We need to be bigger than just beating England.” A new book charts the triumphs and tribulations of Welsh rugby through the players’ own words. Rugby World finds Ross Harries’s Behind the Dragon hard to put down TAGS: Book Review Well said. And right now, as European champions and No 2 in the world, Biggar and Wales could have it all because they have the potential to beat both England and New Zealand and anyone else who might cross their path at the coming World Cup in Japan.BUY NOW with Amazon On the receiving end: Dan Biggar would love to experience victory over the All Blacks (Getty Images)Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Read More »

Hotshot: Dragons and Wales U20 back-row Taine Basham

first_img TAGS: Dragons Wales U20 and Dragons back-row Taine BashamDate of birth 2 November 1999 Born Abergavenny Region Dragons Country Wales Position Back-rowWhen did you first play rugby? From ten at Talywain Juniors, my local club. It was always rugby for me; I never had any interest in other sports.Have you always played in the back row? I started off in the centres, then moved to the back row. I like being more involved in the game.What are your strengths? Probably attacking. Having played centre, I like to get the ball in my hands.And work-ons?As I always played No 8 my main attributes are in attack, so I’m working hard on my defence. I want to be a good jackler, more of an all-round player, so I can play across the back row.Who was your childhood hero? I didn’t watch a lot of rugby growing up, I just played it. My dad, David, used to coach me and he played for Cross Keys and Pontypool before the regional structure, so I always looked up to him. He’s had a big involvement in my career. On the ball: Taine Basham on the attack for Dragons against Castres (Getty Images) Get to know the highly-rated loose forward who is also adept at DIY When did you link up with Dragons? At 15. It’s normally 16 but as there wasn’t a team my age where I’m from, I played up a year all the way through. I’d train with the Dragons twice a week, with a game usually on a Wednesday, and then I joined the academy full-time aged 17.How have you found Dean Ryan? He’s a great coach with lots of experience. He wants to make the region better and is pushing the boys to make it better.You were in the Wales squad for the Baa-Baas match… A highlight in my career so far. To have a taste of the international environment and sit down with Sam Warburton to look through my game… I was like a sponge and it was a great achievement for me. Now I want to see how far I can go.What do you do away from rugby? When I left school I did a course in plastering and bricklaying. Then last July I bought my first house, completely gutted it and I’m now redoing it all.RW VERDICT: Basham says he wants “to get better every day” and he’s already caught the eye of new Wales coach Wayne Pivac. If he continues to stand out for Dragons, he will soon add Test caps to his age-grade honours for Wales. This article originally appeared in the February 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Read More »

Edinburgh v Munster live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSSkip AdAds by Edinburgh v Munster live stream: How to watch the Pro14 match online from anywhereEdinburgh may have unveiled their new stadium this week but it is the more familiar BT Murrayfield that will stage their Guinness Pro14 fixture against Munster this evening (kick-off 7.35pm).Edinburgh and Munster led the way in Conference B in the 2019-20 season before losing in the semi-finals, but they have experienced contrasting fortunes in this campaign.When these two sides met at Thomond Park in October in round two, Munster snuck home 25-23 thanks to Ben Healy’s conversion of a late CJ Stander try.Munster have built on that performance to sit comfortably at the top of Conference B with nine wins from 11 games while Edinburgh are down in fifth with only four victories from ten.Both sides are without most of their internationals for this fixture at BT Murrayfield. Here are the two line-ups and below we explain how to find a reliable live stream for Edinburgh v Munster wherever you are.Edinburgh: Damien Hoyland; Jack Blain, Mark Bennett, Chris Dean, Eroni Sau; Jaco van der Walt, Henry Pyrgos (co-captain); Pierre Schoeman, David Cherry, Lee-Roy Atalifo, Andrew Davidson, Grant Gilchrist (co-captain), Nick Haining, Luke Crosbie, Viliame Mata.Replacements: Mike Willemse, Boan Venter, Murray McCallum, Magnus Bradbury, Ally Miller, Charlie Shiel, Nathan Chamberlain, Matt Currie.Munster: Mike Haley; Andrew Conway, Chris Farrell, Damian de Allende, Shane Daly; JJ Hanrahan, Craig Casey; James Cronin, Niall Scannell, John Ryan, Jean Kleyn, Billy Holland (captain), Jack O’Donoghue, Chris Cloete, Gavin Coombes.Replacements: Kevin O’Byrne, Jeremy Loughman, Stephen Archer, Fineen Wycherley, Jack O’Sullivan, Nick McCarthy, Ben Healy, Rory Scannell.Edinburgh v Munster live stream: How to watch from the UKEdinburgh v Munster, which kicks off at 7.35pm this evening, will be shown live on Premier Sports 1 in the UK.Premier Sports show every Guinness Pro14 match live in the UK. If you have a Sky or Virgin Media contract, you can add Premier Sports to your package from £9.99 a month.Or subscribe to Premier Player so you can stream matches online from £9.99 a month or £99 for 12 months.See Premier Sports offersIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when there’s a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – Virtual Private Network. Check out Express VPN.Edinburgh v Munster live stream: How to watch from IrelandIn Ireland, eir Sport show Pro14 matches live, including Edinburgh v Munster (kick-off 7.35pm on eir Sport 1), and if you sign up for eir broadband you can watch eir Sport for free via the eir TV app and online player. Edinburgh’s Jaco van der Walt tries to make ground v Munster (Sportsfile/Getty Images) Find out more about the eir broadband deals here.Or you can sign up for eir TV and broadband packages, which include eir Sport, from €39.98 a month.If you have Sky TV in Ireland but not eir broadband, you can add eir Sport to your package for €14.99 a month for four months (€29.99 after that) or for €149 for the year – here are the details of the Sky-eir package.If you’re from Ireland but are abroad when there’s a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN.Edinburgh v Munster live stream: How to watch from EuropeIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Italy or Switzerland, you can watch Edinburgh v Munster (kick-off 8.35pm) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN, which is compatible with smart TVs and phones, tablets, PCs, streaming sticks, set-top boxes, gaming consoles and more.Edinburgh v Munster live stream: How to watch from the CanadaDAZN, which allows you to live stream sport or watch it on demand, is the place to go to watch Edinburgh v Munster in Canada. It will kick off at 2.35pm EST and 11.35am on the West Coast.Find out more about DAZN herecenter_img Edinburgh v Munster live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to Edinburgh v Munster from New Zealand, the match kicks off at 8.35am on Sunday morning on Sky Sport NZ Select.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 June 2021 you’ll get your first two months free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Edinburgh v Munster live stream: How to watch from South AfricaSuperSport came on board as a Pro14 broadcast partner when South African franchises Cheetahs and Kings joined the competition in 2017.Edinburgh v Munster kicks off at 9.35pm on SuperSport Rugby.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Find out how to tune in to the Guinness Pro14 match wherever you are in the worldlast_img read more

Read More »

Anglican mission agency leaders recommit to collaboration

first_imgAnglican mission agency leaders recommit to collaboration Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Communion This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls By ACNS staff and Janice PricePosted Mar 19, 2013 Submit a Job Listing Tags [Anglican Communion News Service] Chief executives from 10 leading Anglican mission agencies this week recommitted to work together “in joint action and reflection within the framework of the Five Marks of Mission.”Partnership for World Mission agency leaders gathered for their annual residential meeting at the home of the Church Army, the Wilson Carlile Centre, in Sheffield March 13-14.They represented Church Mission Society, Us, SPCK, Intercontinental Church society, Churches Ministry Among Jewish People, Church Army, Church Pastoral Aid Society, Mothers’ Union, Mission to Seafarers and Crosslinks.Several new chief executives were welcomed to the meeting. Philip Mounstephen of CMS, Andrew Wright of Mission to Seafarers and Richard Bromley of Intercontinental Church Society were all attending their first meeting and reflected afterwards that all 10 full-member societies represented a vast range of work concerned with mission at home and internationally.“As a new CEO it was enormously encouraging to be part of such a gathering where we can all bring our distinctiveness and work in partnership,” said Janette O’Neill, CEO of Us. “We are part of the church not just alongside it and we all want to play our part in discerning God’s mission in the world.”The meeting reflected on the Covenant of Common Mission, which was signed by all 10 chief executives and the archbishop of Canterbury in 2003. It described a commitment to work together in joint action and reflection within the framework of the Five Marks of Mission. All of the chief executives reaffirmed their commitment to the 2003 Covenant of Common Mission a decade on.Just a week before the historic enthronement of the new archbishop of Canterbury, all of the chief executives committed themselves to pray for and work with Archbishop Justin Welby in his future ministry. Mark Russell, CEO of Church Army, said, “As leaders of the mission agencies we will be praying for Archbishop Justin and we look forward to meeting him and sharing with him now and in the future and together keeping mission at the heart of the church.”Looking forward to the 2013 Partnership for World Mission Conference, the chief executives agreed that a focus on mission as both local and global should form the heart of the gathering with a special focus on the changing shape of mission in Europe.Partnership for World Mission comprises the 10 full-member mission agencies together with 21 associate member agencies and the diocesan companion links. It provides a platform for sharing on all aspects of world mission and a link between the Church of England’s General Synod and the mission agencies.— Janice Price is Partnership for World Mission coordinator. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 last_img read more

Read More »

Episcopal priest-curator hopes to build peace through filmmaking

first_img Rector Washington, DC By Pat McCaughanPosted Dec 16, 2014 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Canon Paul-Gordon Chandler hopes his upcoming film, “Ports of Call,” a “passionate interfaith love story,” will help foster understandings between East and West.The Rev. Paul-Gordon ChandlerBut he hesitates to consider it a religious-themed movie because “I’m somewhat of a skeptic looking at religious films, as in the Middle East and the culture I grew up in, you don’t really separate one from the other. It’s all interwoven, a single thread,” said Chandler, former rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Cairo, Egypt.For example, he said, if the new movie “Exodus: Gods and Kings” is shown in the Middle East, “no one thinks that it’s a religious film. It’s simply a story related to the Middle East, whether it’s true or not.”Chandler is the founder and curator of the Caravan interfaith arts exhibition, a nonprofit movement founded in Cairo that since March 2014 has been based in Chicago.Washington National Cathedral and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York recently showcased the Caravan exhibition, “AMEN: A Prayer for the World.” Chandler co-curated the show with Egyptian artist Reda Abdel Rahman. It included a showing of 30 Egyptian artists with Muslim and Christian backgrounds and 18 Western artists with Jewish and Christian backgrounds.Similarly, “Ports of Call,” expected to be released in the spring of 2016, aims to deepen understanding between faiths. It is based on the 1996 novel by Lebanese French author and Académie Française member Amin Maalouf and was nominated for a Nobel Prize for Literature.The story of two ill-fated lovers who meet in Paris during World War II and who are ultimately torn apart by the 1948 Arab-Israeli war will be produced by Ron Senkowski (“Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet,” “Decoding Annie Parker”) and Samira Kawas through their Dubai/L.A.-based Symply Entertainment. Chandler, who initially obtained the rights from Maalouf, is a co-producer.“It’s quite a story,” Chandler told ENS recently from Chicago. “In some ways, the film is a microcosm of the Middle East but it also links to the West and it addresses East-West issues …  it’s got war, tragedy, love, conflict.”“It involves the story of a Lebanese Muslim man of Turkish origin whose mother was Armenian Christian who falls in love during the French resistance in France while studying there, with a young Jewish woman,” so it involves all three Abrahamic faiths, Chandler said.Being a film industry novice didn’t faze Chandler, who grew up in Senegal, the son of missionaries, and “always observed this tension, the divide that exists between the two faiths and cultures, especially between the cultures of the Middle East and the West.”“My father was the pastor of the international church, with services in English and French, in Dakar, the capital city,” he recalled.Drawn to The Episcopal Church while in college, he began to realize that the arts can “bridge creeds and cultures in the East and West” while serving as St. John’s rector in Cairo, he told ENS.Danis Tanovic, who won the 2002 Foreign Language Oscar for “No Man’s Land,” as well as the Cannes 2001 screenplay prize for the film, is directing “Ports of Call.”“The film is about impossible love,” said Senkowski, Symply Entertainment CEO, in an email to ENS about “Ports of Call.” “Love without boundaries. Can two people who are in love survive in a world that is filled with conflict and war dedicated toward destroying people who are of other faiths? Today’s world is filled with blindness toward others.“Today it is neighborhood versus neighborhood, family against family, tribe against tribe. Lines on a map are dividing people as a result of arbitrary, or at least poorly conceived demarcations. These divisions are disrupting and in fact dominating generations of lives. Love thy neighbor is a notion that has been forgotten.”The film hopes to “inspire people to look beyond faith as a defining characteristic upon which to base relationships,” he said.Chandler said the film intends to encourage understanding and respect for one another and to help “overcome the all-too traditional prejudices toward the other” as well as addressing the critical issues of peace-building … “in some ways like an ‘English Patient,’ but with a deeper kind of purpose within it.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal priest-curator hopes to build peace through filmmaking The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

Read More »

Marriage task force calls for gender-neutral language in marriage canon

first_imgMarriage task force calls for gender-neutral language in marriage canon Proposed change would allow clergy to solemnize same-sex unions By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 4, 2015 February 14, 2015 at 12:16 am Those who worship texts instead of God will always do so and will never be persuaded from the certainity of their reading into it what they are determined to find there. Scripture, aka the Bible, aka Jesus’s own words (as claimed by those who composed the Gospels), have been used variously to justify racism, misogyny, discrimination against red-heads (yes, people with red hair). left-handed persons, the prohibition of inter-racial marriage, slavery, and slaughter of Jews and other non-Christians. Of course, for most of the text-literalists of today are fond of claiming that ‘this is different.’ For you test literalists, then, note that neither God in genesis nor God incarnate, Jesus, in the gospels is presented as using the word translated to English as ‘marriage.’ By the way, you do know, right? that the Bible wasn’t written in English? that what you’re reading is a thoroughly human and subjectively chosen translation of Hebrew, Greek, and Aramaic texts, don’t you? You know, don’t you, that you are putting your faith in translations determined by the thoroughly human choices of thoroughly human beings? This is not faith in God. This is idolatry. To admit this will deprive the literalists of their comfortable certitude and require to think for themselves, for a change. They will never willingly pay these costs. Their God is made of ink and paper. I’m happy to let them have it. Featured Jobs & Calls Doug Desper says: February 18, 2015 at 1:42 pm Good post. As I mentioned, I am torn. I will say this, I’ve heard nothing from any of the Episcopal churches I’ve been to that in any way at all sounded anti-Christ. Quite the contrary. I have been in plenty of evangelical churches growing up where attacks on other Christian groups and other people in particular was quite the norm, often with shouts of AMEN. So, we’re either a church that believes Christ loves all or we are people that try to turn God into our image. Peace. Doug Desper says: Comments are closed. Lisa Fox says: Doug Desper says: February 11, 2015 at 11:07 pm As God is my witness the hypocrisy of my progressive brothers and sisters never ceases to amaze me. Is it really any surprise that even Episcopal priests like the two Doug Desper mentions are afraid to say openly they agree with the meaning of traditional marriage for fear of being labled bigots? That their careers could literally be ended because of such views is truly pathetic. I totally agree with Jason Matthews, progressive Episcopalians truly do speak out of both sides of their mouths. A perfect example of that is the earlier letter by Cynthia Katsarelis. Cynthia rails about how unchristian it is to be judgmental toward people like her and her partner because they chose to marry. And yet in that very same letter she puts people who differ with her on this issue in the same realm of immorality as slave holders, witch burners and anti-Semites. Maybe it’s just me but that sounds about as judgmental as it gets! You say no one on earth is qualified to be judgmental about your marriage, yet you apparently consider yourself perfectly qualified to be judgmental of people who consider it wrong. And by the way Cynthia, I will make a deal with you – don’t put quotation marks on words such as traditional values, traditional religion, or conservative in regards to people like me and I won’t put quotation marks on the word marriage in regards to you and your partner. You said in TEC we use reason (I will use a lower case r), I am going to assume you were referring to progressive Episcopalians. Are you saying that no one can claim to be using reason unless they arrive at the same conclusions you and other progressives arrive at? I am going to leave Cynthia and all other progressive Episcopalians with this: God loves all of us equally, conservative as well as progressive. And neither side should think they are spiritually, morally or intellectually superior to the other on this issue or any other issue for that matter. I certainly try to follow the concept of love thy neighbor that Cynthia mentions, but until progressives in this denomination stop looking at fellow conservative parishioners that disagree with them on issues, with such utter contempt, then someday soon all those signs that say The Episcopal Church Welcomes You will be replaced by signs that say The Episcopal Church Welcomes You UNLESS: You’re against same sex marriage, You question climate change, You’re anti-choice, You believe in the literal interpretation of the Bible, You question evolution, You believe illegal aliens should be kept from crossing the border, you question gun control, You belong to the demonic republican party, You embrace capitalism etc etc. You get my point. I wish everyone a happy Ash Wednesday and an equally happy Lent. Submit an Event Listing Tags Rector Collierville, TN Richard McClellan says: Submit a Press Release February 5, 2015 at 12:54 pm Hmmm… I don’t think your application is germane about marriage Donald.In Matthew 19 Jesus didn’t liberalize to the Greek, Roman, or pagan understandings of marriage, just to “include everybody”. He missed the golden opportunity if that’s what it’s all about. He returned the listener to Genesis 2 to understand God’s design for marriage:4 “Haven’t you read,” he replied, “that at the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female,’5 and said, ‘For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’? 6 So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”Jesus had a whole history of aberrations of “marriage” to look back on including polygamy and other guises and had the golden opportunity to make marriage into something “new”, but he instead returned the listener to Genesis for “how to do marriage”. So, that implies that there is design and a value much greater than hospitality, generosity, or perceived notions of fairness.The reliance on “Reason” to make marriage what Jesus himself didn’t make it defies…well reason. We can make anything seem reasonable to ourselves and that should scare us.I have no doubt that General Convention will be ruled more by what looks fair than by the plain words of Christ. Doctrine by vote between lunch and the open cash bar.By all means, let’s just continue to irritate the pews by debating something that should be settled by the plain word of Christ himself. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK February 7, 2015 at 11:05 am The question Lisa: By what authority are you making marriage into what Christ Himself did not? Where is there any ambiguity in Matthew 19 or Genesis 2? February 4, 2015 at 7:05 pm Lord Jesus Christ never broke the law as many think. He interpreted meaning of God’s law only, preserving its sanctity for benefit of human spirituality. Sabbath day is a holy day, a day of rest as God rested on 7th day, Christ interpreted saving a child from a well in Sabbath day does not break sanctity of Sabbath day rather improve it by saving a life. Jesus told us evil spirit comes from inside of our spirit not from dirty hand that Israelis complained to Jesus for His disciples. God commanded to kill adulterer by stone throw, Jesus told Israelis mob to kill the prostitute woman by someone who committed no sins.And again He advised the woman not to commit any more sins according to laws of God. Ten Commandments were given to make us holy, inclusive for all His children. Inclusion of gentiles like us into God’s children was nothing new to God, He had plan from the beginning. By one man’s sin (Adam) we were separated from God but again by one man’s (Jesus Christ) sacrifice we were brought close to God as children of God. Definition of sins, according to eyes of God has never been changed since creation. God knows our heart, mind, body and souls and laws are given to save our souls, not to destroy it. Jesus fulfilled the laws only. Any changes should be in consistence to God’s law of saving souls, for which Jesus paid the price at the CROSS. February 4, 2015 at 6:04 pm Our Church continues to bend to the winds of Political correctness. So much that at times , it really stands tall for nothing.Give a “traditional couple” the choice of whether gender specific language is used or the time honored traditional language which may actually have a special meaning to the couple. Why make everything so homogenous? Is it marriage? Is it still a sacrament ? Do we have sacraments? Watering everything down won’t save the church and thank God 90 % of marries are hetero. Why step on the many to please a few? Give the traditional couple something they can use. Comments (37) February 5, 2015 at 12:13 pm If the church is going to allow same-sex marriage (which I believe it should), then the only way to address the legalistic structure behind it is through gender-neutral language in the canons. It’s not semantically possible to recognize these equally worthy marriages while maintaining language in the canons that specifically excludes them.Mixed-gender couples can still select the rite and wording for their marriage ceremony that has meaning for them. The fact that others can do the same does not “water down” their marriage or the sacrament as a whole.For those who would still wish to specifically exclude others from marriage, the church has devoted much thought, prayer and discussion to this matter, and has not reached the same conclusions that you, personally, have reached. Whenever an institution weighs the opinions and positions of its constituents and comes to a conclusion, there will always be those were were not proponents of that conclusion. These days, it’s inevitable that the term “political correctness” will be bandied about. Those who lost the debate may want believe that the church is therefore guilty of some offense, and “political correctness” is a readily available terminology. But the church is not guilty of this or any other wrong-doing – you simply did not get your way on this matter. February 5, 2015 at 3:56 pm The public’s (1) rapid acceptance of homosexuality, (2) slow rejection of procreation as the essence of marriage, (3) support for civil regulation of marriage, and (4) rejection of nomistic religion have have combined faster than the usual parties can update their thinking. Those who see (1) and only (1) in this report have the shrillest voices today, either for it or against it, but in the long run all of these deep forces will have to be considered carefully and both jointly and severally. After the children have gone to bed, the adults will talk, but it may be a long time before they know what to say. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ February 12, 2015 at 8:11 pm Christianity: In this world but not of this world. Rector Albany, NY Doug Desper says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Same-Sex Marriage Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska February 8, 2015 at 8:35 pm If “the texts of scripture were written by human beings rather [than] by God,” why do you waste time going to church on Sunday? If we’re free to “interpret” the Bible “in light of [our] own times and experiences with Christ Jesus,” than “Christ Jesus” is nothing more than pseudo-theological jargon and the Christian religion is worthless. Bowman Walton says: February 9, 2015 at 11:37 am As a libertarian, I absolutely believe that consenting adults should be able to get married. Right or wrong, my sense of morality nor any church’s sense of morality should not be the law of the land. That said, this report doesn’t change my mind that Christian marriage is between one man and one woman. Sadly, many “progressive” Episcopalians speak out of different sides of their mouth. Many Episcopalians are all too happy to “churchify” secular progressive politics and use the force of government to ram their beliefs down the throats of others (taxes, gun control, social welfare, etc.) and declare it the Gospel. Episcopalians are all too happy to make their sense of morality the law of the land, it’s hypocrisy folks. Frankly, many “progressive” Episcopalians behave no better or no different than the conservative “fundamentalists” that they love to vilify. I don’t want to get off topic, but I have been called vile things by so-called “inclusive” Episcopalians for supporting gun rights. In no way are all who call themselves “inclusive” guilty of this, but I’ve found that those that have to parade around about being “inclusive” are generally some of the most close-minded people you will find. February 4, 2015 at 11:36 pm Great article on the work of the Task Force, Mary Frances. Geoff McLarney says: Terry Francis says: Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ann Fontaine says: James Stoctkon says: John Fitzgerald says: February 4, 2015 at 3:03 pm “Noting the rapidly changing social and legal landscape of marriage, the Task Force on the Study of Marriage says in its report that “this time of flux bears continuing discernment and attention by our Church.”How sad and pathetic. But, I know that I am a minority in this church. This Resolution will pass with an overwhelming majority, I suspect. I will pray daily that the EpiscopalChurch repents (“turns around”) from this error. Ultimately God will judge the correctess of this action, not I.I always thought that the Church has been and should be a counter culture, a counter-weight to the whims of the prevailing culture . “Be not conformed…but be ye transformed” is the cry of Scripture, specifically St. Paul. By going along with the culture on this very serious issue, the Task Force abuses Scripture, compromises the catholic church’s stand,a stand not shared incidentally by Roman Catholic Church, Mormans, Baptists, Muslims, orthodox Jews and the vast majority of the world’s religions.Sigh….. Jean de LaVallette says: Same-Sex Blessings, Rich Basta says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Christopher Johnson says: Jim Stockton says: Jason Matthews says: General Convention, Miguel Rosada says: February 10, 2015 at 1:39 pm There is no love in calling something what it is not! Civil society aside, Christian marriage as defined by Jesus himself, who seemed to have not mentioned nor condemned same gender relationships is quite clear in the gospels. Matthew 19: 4 “…Haven’t you read…that at the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female,’ and said, ‘For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’? No Task Force report, appeals to emotion, GC resolutions, our desire to be nice or charitable can change that! Christian marriage as presupposed by Jesus includes biological difference, complementarity of genders, a husband and a wife…! Same gender relationships, even holy, loving ones, are biologically different, ordered differently! There is not a lot of discernment that needs to be done to see this clearly…it is written in creation ! We do ourselves and all couples a disservice by pretending otherwise. I applaud our society’s progress in equal access to civil marriage, our Church’s pastoral provision for those same gender couples who want a blessing of their union, but to change the language of the marriage canon there is no justification! It seems a poor attempt to blurr what Christ made clear and pretend as if biology never mattered in the sacrament of Holy Matrimony ! I expect more people will flee our parishes over it! Lord have mercy on us all! Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Doug Desper says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET June 3, 2015 at 2:31 pm I have never quite understood why same-sex marriage should be a position associated with “progressives” (which is itself a peculiar label to use in a theological context). Surely it is a “conservative” position to maintain marriage as the exclusively appropriate context for a conjugal relationship between Christians. In that light, if same-sex couples do _not_ marry, then they are living in sin!I don’t entirely follow your laundry list at the end. Capitalism, armed violence, and oppression of the “stranger within the gates” are unacceptable to Christians _because_ they defy the “plain meaning of Scripture”. If “you believe illegal aliens should be kept from crossing the border, you question gun control, You embrace capitalism,” them it follows you do not “believe in the [sic] literal interpretation of the Bible.” Lisa Fox says: F.W.Atkins says: February 5, 2015 at 4:20 pm The main concern that some of us have is that the adults in the room talk from the perspective of a Church that values Scripture-Tradition-and Reason above the culture’s noise and Caesar’s whims, and that when Christ Himself has spoken clearly on a matter that the Church does not pull out the voting cards to see “what fits”. February 13, 2015 at 1:41 pm Simply and perfectly put….my heart breaks because I love our church and see that it has lost its way. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL February 11, 2015 at 12:21 pm Miguel, Jason, Julian, Bowman, Prof John, and many others —After this thread started and heated up a bit I was contacted by a few people. Two were priests. The priests are afraid of publicly agreeing with the traditional meaning of marriage as is being stated here because they will get “marked” as bigots, homophobes, and all the other tags used to squash thoughtful, reasoned exchange of views. There is fear of career-ending stands made from the perspective of the Scriptural and catholic meaning of marriage. Neither believe that they will remain able to follow their consciences and decline a same gender wedding (based on previous temporary seasons for dissent on issues that ended up being retracted). Ain’t that a kicker? I guess that it’s up to the laity to do the standing. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Father Mike Waverly-Shank says: February 16, 2015 at 11:38 am Jesus said He did not come to change the law but to fulfill it. And every and I mean every reference to marriage in the Bible is gender specific – male and female. And that for me settles the question! February 4, 2015 at 4:43 pm Jesus’ teachings were often challenging to the established religious norms of his day. Jesus broke the rules in order to fulfill a greater law and purpose. Always a way to bring more people into the embrace of God’s love. February 17, 2015 at 11:37 pm I want to know more about the pagan roots of what we so boldly proclaim as “Godly marriage”. Is it true that wedding rings were started by pagan Romans? Defenders of DOMA sadly tried to push THEIR version of God into the civil courts and when the Supreme Court called them on it, their house of cards has crumbled. Conservative Christians can rant about separation of church and state unless it’s their version of Christianity. We are all God’s madmen in some way, shape, fashion or form. Personally, I am torn between TEC or attending/joining one of the “continuing” Anglican churches. Both hurl mud, both are stuffy, yet TEC in my area is much closer than the “traditional” Anglican church. Can we not get along? Kudos on the Bible idolatry example. Scary. Richard D Thorn says: February 18, 2015 at 9:16 am Richard: Laying aside all of the mistakes, manipulations, and “getting it wrong” about marriage Jesus returned listeners’ attention to Genesis 2. Nothing else touched or invented by humanity before that day or since that day matters. He even reminds us that God allowed divorce only because our hearts were sinful. That does not detract from the return that Christ makes to the original purpose and design for marriage. The question remains whether or not the words of Christ or private revelations blamed on the Holy Spirit matter more as authoritative. If the latter, then walk out during the Gospel reading this week, because it’s all a lie. C.S. Lewis boiled it down in sum to say that Jesus is either a lunatic or the Son of God. He can’t be both. Therefore, his words either matter or don’t. Buffet-bouncing through His words in the Gospels won’t do. We’re either a Church that believes that the Holy Scriptures contain all things necessary for salvation or we are Unitarians playing at church in fancy dress. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Richard McClellan says: February 8, 2015 at 7:50 pm Doug, the ambiguity is present by virtue of the fact that the texts of scripture were written by human beings rather by God. More , it is but certain that they were written by men exclusively. This is why we Episcopalians do not worship the Bible. We worship the God with whom the authors of the various books of our bible had inspirirational relationships. But just as the New Testament authors were entrusted by God to use the sacred gift of thoughtful reflection to interpret their ancient scriptures in light of their own times and experiences with Christ Jesus, so also God trusts us and expects us to do the same. To approach the text of scripture as a rule book is simply pharisaical; there’s nothing Christlike about that. To approach scripture as though it is God is simply superstious and lazy. Again, there’s nothing in this approach that is faithful to Jesus or to the example that he left us. However, I have no illusion that you are likely to find any of this persuasive. God’s blessings to you and go in peace. Prof. John Switzer says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Julian Malakar says: Human Sexuality, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Donald B Hill says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Lisa Fox says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Doug Desper says: [Episcopal News Service] The A050 Task Force on the Study of Marriage is recommending that the 2015 meeting of General Convention authorize Episcopal Church clergy to officiate at same-sex marriages.The task force proposes the change in its just-released Blue Book report by way of a resolution (numbered A036) that would revise Canon I.18 titled “Of the Solemnization of Holy Matrimony” (page 58 of The Episcopal Church’s canons here).The revision removes, among many edits, the language of I.18.2(b) that requires couples to “understand that Holy Matrimony is a physical and spiritual union of a man and a woman.” Removing that and other gender-specific language from the canon, the report says, addresses the mandate in the group’s enabling resolution that it “address the pastoral need for priests to officiate at a civil marriage of a same-sex couple in states that authorize such.”Section 3 of Canon 18 would be rewritten to, in part, remove the requirement that the couple sign a declaration stating they “solemnly declare that we hold marriage to be a lifelong union of husband and wife as it is set forth in the Book of Common Prayer.”The revision would recast the requirement in the canon’s first section that clergy conform to both “the laws of the state” and “the laws of this Church” about marriage. The rewritten portion of that section would require that clergy conform to “the laws of the State governing the creation of the civil status of marriage, and also to these canons concerning the solemnization of marriage.”Canon I.18 contains the majority of the rules in the church’s canons about clergy officiating at marriage. Canon I.19 governs the “preservation of marriage, dissolution of marriage, and remarriage” and as such refers to “husband” and “wife” in its third section. The Book of Common Prayer, which Article X of the church’s constitution authorizes, refers to marriage on page 422 as Christian marriage being “a solemn and public covenant between a man and a woman in the presence of God.” It uses gender-specific language throughout “The Celebration and Blessing of a Marriage,” “The Blessing of a Civil Marriage” and “An Order for Marriage” rites, as well as in its “Additional Directions” section.The task force says in its report that its revision of Canon I.18 makes the canon “focused on the actual vows made in The Book of Common Prayer marriage rite, rather than on the purposes of marriage in general,” which it adds are stated “in literally creedal form.”The clergy’s discretion to decline to solemnize any marriage is preserved and extended to include the choice to decline offering a blessing on a marriage, the task force said.The 122-page report, the majority of which includes resources the task force developed for the study of marriage and essays on various issues concerning marriage, is available in English here and in Spanish here.The task force was formed in response to a call (via Resolution A050) from the 77th General Convention in July 2012 for a group of “theologians, liturgists, pastors and educators to identify and explore biblical, theological, historical, liturgical and canonical dimensions of marriage.”That same meeting of convention authorized provisional use of a rite to bless same-sex relationships. Use of that rite, Liturgical Resources I: I Will Bless You and You Will Be A Blessing, is due to be reviewed by General Convention in 2015.Noting the rapidly changing social and legal landscape of marriage, the Task Force on the Study of Marriage says in its report that “this time of flux bears continuing discernment and attention by our Church.”Thus the group will ask convention to consider Resolution A037 to continue the task force’s work into the 2016-2018 triennium as a way to “explore further those contemporary trends and norms” the current group has identified.Those trends and norms, the group’s report says, include “those who choose to remain single; unmarried persons in intimate relationships; couples who cohabitate either in preparation for, or as an alternative to, marriage; couples who desire a blessing from the Church but not marriage; parenting by single and/or unmarried persons; differing forms of family and household such as those including same-sex parenting, adoption, and racial diversity; and differences in marriage patterns between ethnic and racial groups, and between provinces inside and outside the United States.”While doing its work this triennium, “the Task Force became highly aware of a growing contemporary reality in society and the Church that is redefining what many mean by ‘family’ or ‘household,’” the group says in its report, adding that “this changing reality is felt in our congregations.”Marriage “as a normative way of life” is being challenged, yet the group says it “did not have the time or resources to fully address this reality.”“More broadly, our Church has done very little to respond to it,” the task force says.The task force’s two resolutions, as well as other expected proposed resolutions on marriage, will be handled by a special legislative Committee on Marriage when the General Convention next meets June 25-July 3 in Salt Lake City.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, said in July that they would appoint the committee “to ensure that the work of the Task Force on Marriage and resolutions related to the rapidly shifting contexts of civil marriage in the United States and in several other parts of the world can be given appropriate consideration.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs February 4, 2015 at 7:57 pm I have been supportive of the blessing of same-sex unions, but I see an entirely new initiative in this proposal. Marriage is being redefined, and honestly, I do not see this as a necessary step to gender equality. In the long run, I expect that this redefinition will be problematic for the church. In addition, this continued rapid advancement leftward will leave our pews even more empty than they already are. We are not a church that values dissident voices when those voices are conservative. Marriage Equality, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem February 14, 2015 at 6:16 am Jim, try to put away your sarcasm for a moment. (For you I know that may be hard to do, but give it your best shot!) Yes Jim, I am well aware that the Bible wasn’t originally written in English. Yes Jim, I know all about the original Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek texts. And your point is? I guess by your reasoning we shouldn’t pay any attention at all to the book because it has now all been written in English. I do not “worship” the Bible Jim, I worship Who it tells about. I am putting my faith in translations written by yes, “thoroughly” human beings but they were also godly human beings who tried to translate these sacred texts as accurately as possible. Maybe they didn’t get it 100% right, but close enough. As for your assumption that there is literally no mention of the word that would eventually be translated in English as marriage mentioned in either the Old or New Testaments, again what is your point? The concept of marriage is mentioned everywhere in the Bible; Genesis2:18, Genesis2:24, Hebrews13:4, St Matthew19:4-5, St Matthew19:1-30, St John2:11, shall I go on Jim? I don’t mind engaging in an honest debate but people like yourself seem to take pleasure in ridiculing, and being condescending to those who have a different point of view. Let me assure you that I do think for myself, even if, God forbid, my conclusions run counter to yours. You said that the God of people who have a more literal interpretation of the Bible is a God made up of ink and paper. Your God is made up of what you perceive to be your superior intellect and I will happily leave you to that. Terry Francis says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Doug Desper says: June 3, 2015 at 2:24 pm Christ did not “define” any such thing as “Christian marriage.” That is an anachronism not to be found in the Bible. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC February 5, 2015 at 1:14 pm Prof. Switzer: This news comes the same week that our beloved Episcopal Church LOST in South Carolina court to prevent the dissenting diocese of South Carolina from retaining its property as it left TEC. The reason that these people (among so many others) have dissented, and even left, is due to the very mindset shown by re imagining Christian marriage; something that will more than likely be enacted at General Convention. Such actions by General Convention are making the case that critical decisions are being made that cannot be reconciled with the Holy Scripture, nor by the Church catholic. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Mary Martha Quinn says: Doug Desper says: February 4, 2015 at 10:56 pm Thank you, Cynthia Katsarelia. I would only add that not only is “History… not going to look kindly on the excluders;” but God is unlikely to do so either. “Traditional Conservatives” should also remember that “it is what comes out of the mouth that defiles!” Rector Shreveport, LA February 4, 2015 at 8:56 pm My partner of 23 years and I got married. Really married, legally and using the beautiful I Will Bless You and You Will be a Blessing liturgy.Our relationship has always been sacramental, an inward Grace that was finally expressed outwardly a few weeks ago. We were very surprised that after 23 years, that the vows before God, supported robustly by our fellow parishioners, and legal in my state could have such a beautiful and loving impact, and yet it did.No one on earth is qualified to be judgmental about our marriage. It is between me and my partner and God and our loving parish. If you think you have the right to withhold the outward expression of God’s Grace in the church, please go back to the NT and read where Jesus says don’t judge. Read how he always stands for the oppressed against the status quo, especially when the status quo was using the Law to exclude others. “Conservatives” would use the law to exclude LGBT people in the very same way the law was used to support slavery, anti-semitism, and the burning of witches. Sadly, “traditional” values include those awful things. And thus in TEC we also use Reason. We, my LGBT sisters and brothers, are not “positions” from which it is OK to just dissent, as if it were about smaller or bigger government. The fruits of the exclusive position include homeless LGBT teens who’ve been cast out of their “traditional religious” homes, and many of them are subjected to sexual abuse on the streets. The fruits also include bullying, hate crimes, suicide, depression, etc. There are negative consequences as the fruits of the “traditional conservative” position. And that should give everyone pause. Why did God create us all? It wasn’t for hate and exclusion. History is not going to look kindly on the excluders. And I don’t see how that position is compatible with the commandment to “love your neighbor” – every last one of them on the planet. Rector Bath, NC Featured Events February 5, 2015 at 4:27 pm “….For those who would still wish to specifically exclude others from marriage, ..” John, I think that the problem a lot of us have is to know by what authority anyone has revised marriage to “include” what Christ Himself did not. A group of voters on the matter does not right doctrine make. That single council of the Church called General Convention must know that it may act to make what Christ did not, but then it cannot continue to claim to be a part of a catholic Church due to its aberration undertaken apart from the advice and wisdom of the rest of the Communion. February 6, 2015 at 9:06 pm Reading the responses of those opposed to this proposed change, I must ask, “Really? Did you actually read the report, or are you just reverting to your narrow, heterosexist understanding of the marriage covenant?” Please read the Task Force report. Marriage has long been a contractual construct regarding property (including the husband’s “owning” the wife) and not a sacramental one. As we did in creation and adoption of the 1979 BCP, I believe the Task Force has returned to First Principles. I applaud the work of the task force, and I hope GC will adopt the gist of their recommendations. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA February 5, 2015 at 10:25 am I’m wondering if we have the capacity to be genuine and honest about marriage and so to admit that it is was a pagan social covenant that was adapted by the ancient Hebrews from the various cultures from which they emerged to become a people, then a secular contract in which the Church had little interest until the 11th and 12th centuries. As any attorney should be able to confirm, the language used by this Church today for sealing the covenant of matrimony is, in many places, exactly the same as is used for the purchase of real estate. Marriage is a secular contract in which the Church has chosen to involve itself, and one that the State has chosen to recruit the Church to serve as its agent. There is no reason that the Church may not or should not define the covenant of marriage as it deems fit, regardless of the State’s definition of same. There is nothing legally to prevent or forbid the Church from sealing a covenant between two persons that the Church recognizes and honors, even if the State does not. The Church should not allow itself to be bound, restricted, or defined in its ministry by the State. The Church should not allow the State the de facto role of declaring the sanctity of a union. Determining a legal definition of a contract is the State’s or government’s business. Determining the Church’s definition is the Church’s business. There is no inherent link. The Church could, and I think it should, determine sacred union for ALL the Church without exception and irrespective of differing laws of States. The only distinction, then, would be whether or not the union would be recognized by State law; but this is a concern rightly to be addressed by the couple concerned. It is important only that the Church be forthright with the couple and with all concerned that the union will or will not be legally recognized by the State; but the Church should be clear and declarative that the State does not determine the union’s sanctity before God. Homophobes and xenophobes will not be changed in their opinions. So be it. May the Church, then, with the courage granted her by the inspiration of those saints in ages past who challenged brutality wed to scriptural justification under the guise of tradition, press forward with confidence that God indeed is Love. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cynthia Katsarelis says: Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Geoff McLarney says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Jim Stockton says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI February 6, 2015 at 9:10 pm Amen, my brother. I suspect those commenting negatively here haven’t bothered to study history or to read the Task Force report. You are exactly right. Press Release Service Bruce Marshall says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 6, 2015 at 9:09 pm God bless you, Cynthia Katsarelis, and your marriage.I hope the naysayers will actually read the report of the Task Force. The sacrament of marriage should be a holy covenant before God and our congregations, not the enforcement of a civil contract enforced by the State. I hope and trust that this change will enrich our church, as I am pleased to hear it has blessed your married life. Rector Martinsville, VA February 5, 2015 at 2:07 pm Notice that Jesus says ” God said” and quotes a piece of the narrative of Genesis 2, not a piece within quotation marks. That is, Jesus understood Genesis to be spoken by God, and that it is God, not church or state, who defines marriage. February 9, 2015 at 6:51 am I can think of nothing worse to say than that the words of Jesus Christ are not “Christ like”. Is this really where we are as a Church? I dread to think so. We are being asked to replace the Biblical witness and over 2,000 years of catholic faith with the private revelations of revisionist activists. Such views are predicating themselves on how erroneous and superstitious it is to believe in anything other than one’s own reasoned thoughts. If such becomes the case then God will not prosper this Church and we will continue to decline as the current trajectory so clearly indicates. Isn’t it interesting that the more faith and practice become revised and replaced that we increasingly think of how to survive as an institution; a subject being addressed separately at General Convention? I also find it interesting that as our Church assaults God’s 1st institution so clearly affirmed by Christ that we are grasping for how to go on with our own structures and institutions.last_img read more

Read More »