Signature bosses named joint entrepreneur of year

first_imgSignature Flatbreads bosses Charles and William Eid have triumphed in an awards ceremony that celebrates outstanding individual achievement.The firm’s joint chief executives won the Entrepreneur of the Year accolade at the Insider Central & East Dealmakers Awards, an event that also recognises the success of corporate finance firms, banks, and funders in the UK.The brothers, who built up the family business before leaving in 2011 following its acquisition by bakery conglomerate Aryzta, were one of five shortlisted candidates in the category and recognised for their entrepreneurial flair. The business was also named Bakery Manufacturer of the Year in British Baker’s 2017 Baking Industry Awards.The men returned to Signature Flatbreads in a joint venture with Arytza in 2015, after setting up a flatbread operation on the Indian subcontinent to supply traditional Indian flatbreads to the local population.  They have since doubled the size of the Signature Flatbreads UK business, returned to full ownership after buying back the Aryzta share earlier this year – and, in 2018, exceeded £100m in annual turnover for the first time.“Since being brought back into the business, William and Charles have committed to making significant investments to boost productivity, grow 100 new roles, and pledge millions to help meet the rising demand for high-quality, British-made products,” the judges said. “This clearly demonstrates their entrepreneurial flair.”Charles Eid added: “We are delighted to have been recognised in these awards, which we share with the outstanding team of people at Signature Flatbreads. We are hugely ambitious, and are excited to build on the strong foundation that the company has in place.”Signature Flatbreads exports to more than 30 countries from the UK and another 20 countries from its bakery in India. Its breads can be found as far afield as Shanghai, Tokyo, South Korea, Australia, Russia, Kenya, throughout Europe and the Middle East and more.last_img read more

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Western Hemisphere Nations Face Threats in Common

first_imgBy Dialogo October 17, 2012 Nations of the Western Hemisphere are a family sharing many of the same threats that confront them across borders and oceans, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said in Uruguay on October 8. Panetta spoke at the plenary session of the 10th Conference of Defense Ministers of the Americas. The themes of the conference include defense and security, peacekeeping, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. The secretary called these themes a central part of efforts to enhance regional security and increase cooperation between military forces in the hemisphere. “Over the last two decades, our people, our economies, our cultures and our values have become even more connected, not just because we are neighbors, but because we are one family in this hemisphere,” Panetta told participants from many nations. Last week, Panetta released the Western Hemisphere Defense Policy Statement, a framework for implementing the new U.S. defense strategy across Latin America. In the Western Hemisphere, according to the new policy, the United States will reinvigorate its defense partnerships and pursue new ones, consistent with President Barack Obama’s approach to the region, the secretary said. The statement’s three objectives include promoting the following: – Strong national government institutions that allow all nations in the region to address legitimate threats to the state and their citizens. – Shared action against shared threats through more effectively and efficiently coordinating defense forces. – Multilateral mechanisms and institutions, like the current conference and the Inter-American Defense Board, to achieve consensus on the direction of hemispheric defense collaboration. On humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, the United States supports the Chilean initiative to accelerate and coordinate support for civilian-led relief efforts, Panetta said. On peacekeeping, countries in the Western Hemisphere have assumed an impressive leadership role by engaging, addressing and improving United Nations peacekeeping, Panetta said. In a new era of defense cooperation in the hemisphere, Panetta said, “Our goal is to work with those nations that want us to help them to develop their capabilities so that they can defend and secure themselves. Our interest is to work with you, not against you.” *Cheryl Pellerin, American Forces Press Service Very good, the peace of LORD JESUSlast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Discusses Efforts to Reduce Veterans’ Homelessness, Expand Resources Available to Veterans at the 53rd Annual VFW Mid-Winter Conference

Press Release,  Veterans Pittsburgh, PA – Today, Governor Wolf attended the VFW’s 53rd Annual Mid-Winter Conference in Pittsburgh. The governor discussed issues faced by veterans in our communities, progress in veterans’ services, and thanked the VFW for working to ensure that veterans across the Commonwealth are getting the support they deserve.“It is our responsibility to take care of those who take care of us every day, through their service to this country,” said Governor Wolf. “Whether you are working in the VFW, working with DMVA, or working with us through the State Veterans Commission, you all are the best voice and advocate for Pennsylvania veterans”Governor Wolf highlighted recent programs and initiatives aimed to improve the process in which active military members and veterans receive services, information, and support.In 2015, Governor Wolf and his administration committed to working towards an end to veterans’ homelessness by helping veterans off the streets and into safe, permanent, and sustainable housing.The Wolf Administration has worked with the VFW and partners in local and Federal government to find housing for Pennsylvania veterans. In late 2016, a year after making the initial commitment, Governor Wolf and the Department of Military and Veterans affairs announced that more than 2,200 homeless veterans had been placed in permanent housing.Last November, Governor Wolf was joined by the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs and the Department of Human Services to announce the launch of the Pennsylvania Network of Care for veterans, military members, and their families.The Pennsylvania Network of Care is an interactive web portal that provides information to military families and veterans for a variety of local resources such as social networking, job postings, health records, peer support and advocacy. The program has worked to streamline services and reduce complexity for those who are searching for local services.“We are making sure that veterans have access to the support they need when making the transition back to home life,” Governor Wolf said. “We all know that our service members and veterans should not have to jump through hoops, or face a confusing and fragmented system, when returning home and seeking services”Earlier this month, Governor Wolf and Secretary of State Pedro Cortés announced that military veterans and reservists are now exempt from certain fees for business start-ups and professional licensure.“Eliminating these fees for our military veterans and reservists is another way to foster the best possible business climate in Pennsylvania,” Governor Wolf said. “At the same time, we are showing veterans the gratitude they deserve for their service and sacrifices.”The Department of the Pennsylvania VFW hosts a membership of more than 90,000 combat vets who belong to 400 local Posts. The VFW continues to set the pace for growth and program development that provides advocacy, camaraderie, support and outreach for veterans and service members across the Commonwealth.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf Discusses Efforts to Reduce Veterans’ Homelessness, Expand Resources Available to Veterans at the 53rd Annual VFW Mid-Winter Conference SHARE Email Facebook Twitter January 20, 2017 read more

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Allen Hurns on being released by Cowboys: ‘Just wished they did this earlier’

first_img Cowboys, Yankees headline Forbes’ 50 Most Valuable Sports Teams “No limitations,” Hurns said. “I was set to be full go for camp so I’m ready.”How is Allen Hurns health wise currently? He tells me “No limitations, I was set to be full go for camp so I’m ready.” https://t.co/pQ2eiySDzJ— Jane Slater (@SlaterNFL) July 23, 2019The Cowboys have multiple options at wide receiver as they brought in veteran Randall Cobb this offseason and re-signed Tavon Austin.“I’m very happy and very excited to be down in Dallas,” Cobb said last month, via USA Today’s Cowboys Wire . “I think it’s a great situation, and I look forward to this season.” Dak Prescott ‘the first guy’ Cowboys want to get under contract, report says “I’m good,” Hurns said. “Just wished they did this earlier, they asked me for a pay cut Monday, (a) couple days before camp.”Hurns signed a two-year deal, worth up to $12 million, with Dallas in March 2018. He caught 20 passes for 295 yards and two touchdowns in his first season with the team before suffering a serious leg injury against the Seahawks during the wild-card round. Hurns said he was 100% healed. Related Newscenter_img Allen Hurns is no longer a part of the Cowboys’ organization.Dallas, which is set to begin training camp later this week, wanted the 27-year-old wide receiver to take a pay cut and is reportedly planning to release him. Hurns discussed the situation Tuesday during a brief interview with NFL Network. Dallas also has star Amari Cooper after acquiring him in a trade with the Raiders in October 2018.The Cowboys will save about $5 million by cutting Hurns, according to ESPN. He spent his first four NFL seasons with the Jaguars.last_img read more

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Waterloo man pleads not guilty to Floyd County sex crimes

first_imgCHARLES CITY — A Waterloo man jailed in Floyd County on sexual abuse charges has pleaded not guilty. 23-year-old Cortavius Benford has been charged with two counts of lascivious acts with a child by fondling or touching, one count of lascivious acts with a child by solicitation, enticement of a child under the age of 16 for a sexual purpose, and dissemination and exhibition of obscene materials to minors. Authorities accuse Benford of committing the acts in the fall of last year with a young teenage victim. Benford recently submitted a written plea of not guilty to the charges, with his trial tentatively scheduled to start on April 28th. If convicted of all the charges, Benford could face up to 31 years in prison.last_img read more

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Donald named to AP All-America team; Mosley, Sutton, Carey repeat

first_imgPittsburgh’s Aaron Donald poses for a photo with the Bronko Nagurski award for the NCAA college football defensive player of the year during a news conference in Charlotte, N.C., Monday, Dec. 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)NEW YORK (AP) – A tackle-machine linebacker, a tackle-busting running back and one of the most disruptive defensive tackles in the country made return appearances on The Associated Press All-America team.Alabama linebacker C.J. Mosley, Arizona running back Ka’Deem Carey and Arizona State defensive tackle Will Sutton were selected to the first team for the second straight season.Mosley and Sutton are on the first-team defense with Pittsburgh defensive tackle Aaron Donald, who won the Nagurski and Bednarik awards as the nation’s best defensive player and the Outland and Lombardi as the country’s best lineman.The All-America teams were released Tuesday and selected by a panel of AP college football poll voters.Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston talks to reporters after winning the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, in New York. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston from Florida State added All-American to his resume after a spectacular redshirt freshman season. Heisman finalists Andre Williams from Boston College and Northern Illinois’ Jordan Lynch also made the first team. Williams joins Carey in the backfield and Lynch, the dual-threat quarterback, was chosen as an all-purpose player.Carey, a junior, is second in the nation in rushing after leading last year, but said he thinks he’s a better player now.“I worked hard to improve my speed and strength in the offseason while keeping my speed,” Carey said. “I put on 10 pounds of weight and I think that’s helped my durability. I also wanted to be a better blocker away from the ball. Blocking for our quarterback and our receivers is key to our system and it’s important that I do my part even when I’m not carrying the ball.”Mosley, a senior, was the leading tackler for a defense that ranked fifth in the country in yards allowed per game. Sutton, a senior, was named Pac-12 defensive player of the year for the season straight season.Winston, a landslide Heisman winner last week, is joined on the first team by three Florida State teammates – center Bryan Stork, kicker Roberto Aguayo and cornerback Lamarcus Joyner – to give the top-ranked Seminoles more than any other school.Florida State defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan made the second team, along with offensive tackle Cameron Erving. The Seminoles had six players on the three teams, the most of any school.No. 2 Auburn, which plays Florida State on Jan. 6 in the BCS championship game in Pasadena, Calif., placed Heisman finalists Tre’ Mason on the second team at running back and offensive lineman Reese Dismukes and Gregory Robinson on the third team.Texas A&M Heisman finalist Johnny Manziel, last year’s Heisman winner and All-American quarterback, made the second team. Alabama’s AJ McCarron, another Heisman finalist, is the third-team quarterback for the second consecutive season.The first-team receivers are Oregon State’s Brandin Cooks, who leads the nation in yards receiving (139.2 per game), and Texas A&M’s Mike Evans, who is averaging 20.3 yards a catch.Texas Tech’s Jace Amaro is the first-team tight end. The senior leads all tight ends in catches (98) and yards (1,240).Joining Stork on the offensive line are Texas A&M tackle Jake Matthews and Alabama tackle Cyrus Kouandjio, as well as Baylor guard Cyril Richardson and Stanford guard David Yankey. Richardson and Yankey were second-team All-Americans last season.Missouri’s Michael Sam, the Southeastern Conference defensive player of the year, and Jackson Jeffcoat, the Big 12 defensive player of the year join Mosley, Sutton and Donald. UCLA’s Anthony Barr and Ohio State’s Ryan Shazier round out the linebackers.Michigan State’s Darqueze Dennard, one of the leaders of the nation’s top-ranked defense, is the other cornerback with Joyner. The safeties are Mississippi’s Cody Prewitt and Washington State’s Deone Bucannon.Tom Hornsey of Memphis made the first team as the punter.Florida State helped the Atlantic Coast Conference put six players on the first team, to match the Pac-12 and SEC for the most from any conference.last_img read more

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Breast Cancer Basics – What You Should Know About Mammograms And…

first_imgThe goal of the Paint the Town Pink campaign is to get women, age 40 and older, to schedule their annual mammograms and to raise funds for screening mammograms for women who can’t afford them. Here are questions and answers about mammography and breast cancer from the National Institute of Cancer.What is a mammogram?A mammogram is an x-ray picture of the breast.
Mammograms can be used to check for breast cancer in women who have no signs or symptoms of the disease. This type of mammogram is called a screening mammogram. Screening mammograms usually involve two x-ray pictures, or images, of each breast. The x-ray images make it possible to detect tumors that can’t be felt. Screening mammograms can also find microcalcifications (tiny deposits of calcium) that sometimes indicate the presence of breast cancer.
Mammograms can also be used to check for breast cancer after a lump or other sign or symptom of the disease has been found. This type of mammogram is called a diagnostic mammogram. Signs of breast cancer may include pain, skin thickening, nipple discharge, or a change in breast size or shape; however, these signs may also be indicators of benign conditions. A diagnostic mammogram can also be used to evaluate changes found during a screening mammogram or to view breast tissue when it is difficult to obtain a screening mammogram because of special circumstances, such as the presence of breast implants.How are screening and diagnostic mammograms different?Diagnostic mammography takes longer than screening mammography because more x-rays are needed to obtain views of the breast from several angles. The technician may magnify a suspicious area to produce a detailed picture that can help the doctor make an accurate diagnosis.What are the benefits of screening mammograms?Early detection of breast cancer with screening mammography means that treatment can be started earlier in the course of the disease, possibly before it has spread. Results from randomized clinical trials and other studies show that screening mammography can help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer among women ages 40 to 74, especially for those over age 50.What are the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) recommendations for screening mammograms?Women age 40 and older should have mammograms every one to two years. Women who are at higher than average risk of breast cancer should talk with their health-care providers about whether to have mammograms before age 40 and how often to have them.What factors increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer?The strongest risk factor for breast cancer is age. A woman’s risk of developing this disease increases as she gets older. The risk of breast cancer, however, is not the same for all women in a given age group. Research has shown that women with the following risk factors have an increased chance of developing breast cancer:Personal history of breast cancerWomen who have had breast cancer are more likely to develop a second breast cancer.Family historyA woman’s chance of developing breast cancer increases if her mother, sister, and/or daughter have been diagnosed with the disease, especially if they were diagnosed before age 50. Having a close male blood relative with breast cancer also increases a woman’s risk of developing the disease.Genetic alterations (changes)Inherited changes in certain genes (for example, BRCA1, BRCA2, and others) increase the risk of breast cancer. These changes are estimated to account for no more than 10 percent of all breast cancers. However, women who carry certain changes in these genes have a much higher risk of breast cancer than women who do not carry these changes.Breast densityWomen who have a high percentage of dense breast tissue have a higher risk of breast cancer than women of similar age who have little or no dense tissue in their breasts. Some of this increase may reflect the “masking” effect of fibroglandular tissue on the ability to detect tumors on mammograms.Certain breast changes found on biopsyLooking at breast tissue under a microscope allows doctors to determine whether cancer or another type of breast change is present. Most breast changes are not cancer, but some may increase the risk of developing breast cancer.Reproductive and menstrual historyWomen who had their first menstrual period before age 12 or who went through menopause after age 55 are at increased risk of developing breast cancer. Women who had their first full-term pregnancy after age 30 or who have never had a full-term pregnancy are also at increased risk of breast cancer.Long-term use of menopausal hormone therapyWomen who use combined estrogen and progestin menopausal hormone therapy for more than five years have an increased chance of developing breast cancer.Radiation therapyWomen who had radiation therapy to the chest (including the breasts) before age 30 have an increased risk of developing breast cancer throughout their lives. This includes women treated for Hodgkin lymphoma. Studies show that the younger a woman was when she received treatment, the higher her risk of developing breast cancer later in life.AlcoholStudies indicate that the more alcohol a woman drinks, the greater her risk of breast cancer.DES (diethylstilbestrol)The drug DES was given to some pregnant women in the United States between 1940 and 1971 to prevent miscarriage. Women who took DES during pregnancy may have a slightly increased risk of breast cancer. The effects of DES exposure on breast cancer risk in their daughters are unclear and still under study.Body weightStudies have found that the chance of getting breast cancer after menopause is higher in women who are overweight or obese.Physical activity levelWomen who are physically inactive throughout life may have an increased risk of breast cancer. Being active may help reduce risk by preventing weight gain and obesity.Additional information about breast cancer and mammography is available from the National Institute of Cancer at the National Institutes of Health at www.Cancer.gov/cancertopics/screening/breast/mammogram.last_img read more

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Burrows, Canucks take major bite out of Bruins, edge Boston 3-2 in overtime

first_imgFourteen wins down, two to go.Alex Burrows took a major league bite out of the Boston Bruins, scoring 11 seconds into overtime to lift the Vancouver Canucks to a 3-2 victory in game two of the Stanley Cup Final Saturday at the Rogers Centre.Vancouver now leads the best-of-seven Cup series 2-0 with game three set for Monday in Boston. Game time is 5 p.m. PDT on CBC-TV.Burrows, sent into the Boston zone on a quick pass from Daniel Sedin, faked a shot before circling the goal and slipping the puck into the vacant net before falling to the ice in jubliation.“Danny (Sedin) made a great chip . . . I knew I had a step on (Zdeno Chara),” Burrows told CBC-TV after the game. “We did some pre-scouting on Tim Thomas and we know he likes to challenge.“I wanted to fake a shot, go around and shoot right away. (Thomas) kind of tried to trip me a little bit because he knew I had the angle. I was just able to just wrap it, it was tight angle and I was just lucky it went in.”The heroics of Burrows, finishing the game with three points, may not have happened had the NHL’s disciplinary committee decided to suspend the Canuck winger for his alleged bite of the finger of Patrice Bergeron during game one of the series.Instead the league determined there was not enough evidence to suspend the Canuck winger, even though NHL senior vice-president of hockey operations Mike Murphy spoke to Burrows.“Everybody who follows our team knows he’s a pretty big part of our team,” Vancouver head coach Alain Vigneault told the media during the post-game press conference when asked about the significance of Burrows being in the lineup.“He plays 5-on-5. He plays power play and kills penalties. He’s one of our go-to guys and again came up big . . .. I thought he was one of our better players and we need him to play that way.”Burrows opened the scoring in the first period, surprising Thomas with a quick shot during the late stages of a power play.Former Vancouver Giant Milan Lucic tied the game in the second before Kamloops native Mark Recchi game Boston its first lead of the series.Boston finished the period out shooting the Canucks 14-10.Vancouver took the play to the Bruins and at 9:37 of the period were rewarded when Burrows tapped the puck over to Daniel Sedin who snapped a shot past Thomas.The Canucks were given an emotional lift with the return of centre Manny Malhotra.Malhotra had been out of the lineup since suffering a severe eye injury March 16 against Colorado Avalanche.“It was great, obviously,” Burrows explained when asked about his teammate. “Manny has worked so hard to get back into shape and be in the lineup with us. “When his injury happened we were afraid for him and for his career too. Obviously it’s nice to see that he’s healthy, but competing with us, that’s even better.”CUP NOTES: The goal by Alex Burrows was the second fastest in NHL history. Twenty-five years ago, Montreal’s Brian Skrudland scored just nine seconds into OT in Calgary to give the Canadiens a 3-2 win in Game 2 of the Final. Skrudland broke the mark of 11 seconds set in 1975 by the New York Islanders’ J.P. Parise in the third and deciding game of their preliminary-round series against the Rangers. . . .Both teams spent the night in Vancouver after the game, choosing to fly to Boston Sunday . . . .The Bruins have a tough task ahead of them as the record for a team falling behind 0-2 in the series is 4-42. . . . Manny Malhotra., playing 7:26 in the game, was 6-1 in the face off circle in game two. . . .Vancouver finished the game out shooting Boston 33-30 thanks to an 11-5 advantage in the third [email protected]last_img read more

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Darwin’s Evil Fruit Exposed

first_imgTwo recent books expose bitter legacies of Darwin’s idea that the fittest rule a world without God.EugenicsA book review in Nature contains sober reminders that ideas have consequences. In “When eugenics became law,” Victoria Nourse reports on a new study Adam Cohen on the historic misuse of biology in the US: Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck. We must never forget:Eugenics is a well-known low point in the modern history of science. In the United States, from the late nineteenth century to the 1940s, credence was given to this pseudoscience focused on the notional ‘improvement’ of human populations by halting the reproduction of supposedly lesser genes. Less well known is the story of how US law rendered eugenics intellectually respectable across the world, supporting programmes from Canada to Sweden. Ultimately, this egregious failing led to the enforced sterilization of at least 60,000 US citizens, and was used by the Nazi regime to justify its own programme of sterilization and, later, extermination.Americans tend to blame Hitler alone; how many realize the guilt of American scientists in what happened? Eugenics was alive and well in the United States long before Hitler took it to extremes. Nourse says that America bears guilt for making it “intellectually respectable” around the world. John West documents that as well in his book Darwin Day in America.(See also video The War on Humans).Nourse calls eugenics a “pseudoscience,” but is reticent to reveal that leading American scientists strongly promoted it, enshrining it with statues of Darwin and Galton in the American Museum of Natural History. It led to the infamous Supreme Court ruling Buck v. Bell (1927), wherein Chief Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes upheld a forced sterilization law with the infamous comment, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.” Carrie Buck, incarcerated in an asylum because of being diagnosed as an “imbecile” (an extremely non-scientific term), along with her mother and daughter, lived a long and fulfilling life after her forced sterilization. “All three had been erroneously ‘diagnosed’ with mental disabilities,” Nourse writes, but then she tries to exonerate Darwin for this bad fruit:Before Buck v. Bell, eugenic sterilization had been advocated for decades by US reformers and scientists, including prominent biologist Charles Davenport, but it had been used only sporadically because of fears that it was illegal. Eugenics itself was born in Britain in the late nineteenth century, nurtured by polymath Francis Galton, a half-cousin of Charles Darwin. The concept resonated with contemporary interpretations of ‘social Darwinism’, which hinged on engineering the ‘survival of the fittest’ — a gross caricature of Darwin’s idea.But historical facts are facts. Not only did Darwin (though personally magnanimous) provide the intellectual justification for survival of the fittest in his Origin and Descent of Man, he did not hinder his half-cousin Galton from taking that idea and running with it into advocacy of social policy. The Brits exported it into America, where it took root and grew like a toxic weed among the leading scientists (not “pseudoscientists”) and intelligentsia:By 1928, a total of 375 US universities and colleges were teaching eugenics, and 70% of high-school biology textbooks endorsed the pseudoscience in some form. Eugenics was also endorsed by presidents including Theodore Roosevelt, funded by philanthropic organizations including the Carnegie Institution, and touted by award-winning scientists such as biologist Edwin Grant Conklin and the Nobel laureate Hermann Muller, discoverer of X-ray mutagenesis, as well as prominent inventors such as Alexander Graham Bell. Eugenics came to be seen as the solution to everything from hearing loss to criminality. In Britain, advocates tended to focus on segregation and voluntary sterilization. Major British eugenicists included left-leaning scientists J. B. S. Haldane and Havelock Ellis, and supporters included the economist John Maynard Keynes, social reformers Sidney and Beatrice Webb, and writer H. G. Wells.H. G. Wells, in fact, can be seen in a video clip trashing what he considers the unfit, demanding that they justify their existence on the planet. This was not some fly-by-night pseudoscience but a leading movement for decades, until the horrors of the Holocaust made it politically incorrect. Today, there are worries about gene editing creating the conditions for a resuscitation of eugenics (see, for instance, this ethical warning in Nature). Does Nourse warn about the lessons of history? No; all she says at the last sentence about “one of the most spectacular miscarriages of justice in US history” is that, “To this day, the Supreme Court has never officially overruled Buck v. Bell.”CommunismIn Science Magazine, Irving A. Lerch reviews a new autobiography by a man called “the most wanted man in China” during the reign of Mao Zedong, the late Fang Lizhi—”a renowned scientist, humane scholar, political activist, intractable enemy of authoritarian government, and courageous advocate of human rights.” Here’s just a taste of the totalitarian world of suspicion, illogic and slavery after Mao came to power:In 1957, Fang was exiled to labor in the rural fields of China. He would return and be banished again multiple times over the next two decades, perhaps targeted for helping to draft a critical letter to Party Central—criticism invited by the Party but designed to identify potential dissidents. The enlistment of Chinese intellectuals in their own suppression was so successful that none could emerge as a heroic figure capable of capturing public sentiment or leadership.Fang appreciated the resilience of his fellow laborers. During his exile to the Xishan coal mines, he recalled one miner’s response to demands for greater productivity: “‘Sixty cents of pay buys sixty cents of work.’”Fang soon learned that party proscriptions extended to the kinds of scientific inquiry that could be pursued. The precedent set by the Soviet Union was to discourage the study of modern science in adherence with Marxist principles, an approach that foundered on the shoals of reality after World War II. With the enlistment of scientists in the nuclear program, Stalin was forced to promote talented physicists like Andrei Sakharov, who became “heroes of the revolution.” Mao knew that all he needed were faceless technicians to build his bomb.And so it went for this courageous scientist and intellectual, treated like a faceless coal miner by the regime. By 1989, Fang had hoped the air was clearing for freedom:In the winter of 1989, Fang wrote a letter to Deng Xiaoping noting that the year marked the 40th anniversary of the founding of the PRC and the 70th anniversary of the May Fourth Movement. “In order to capture the spirit of these occasions in the best possible way, I sincerely propose that you announce a general amnesty, specifically to include all political prisoners,” he concluded. This letter would be cited by the authorities as the principal cause of the student demonstrations that incited the government to use military force, which resulted in the massacre in Tiananmen Square.Exiled to the United States, Fang continued his advocacy of human rights until his death 4 years ago at age 76. Although Lerch does not connect the dots from Darwin to Mao in his review, it is well known that all the communist leaders have been staunch Darwinians who, like Marx, viewed Darwinism as the scientific justification for their views. Human rights are fruits of the Judeo-Christian tradition that sees every individual as a valuable person made in the image of God, “endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights”.Update 3/02/06: Breitbart News quotes BBC sources saying that communist rulers of Cambodia cannibalized their victims. A summary at the end of the article provides context:Pol Pot led the Khmer Rouge regime between 1963 and 1981. The regime committed genocide between 1975 and 1979, when they sought to install the purest form of communism in the world, leaving one to three million people dead. The country lost 25% of its population from torture, malnutrition, executions, disease, and forced labor.Witnesses at the trial of top leaders responsible for the “Killing Fields” report seeing the butchers celebrating with alcohol as they ate livers and gall bladders of their victims, including organs from a pregnant woman that had just been murdered.Those too young to remember the cold war cannot imagine the depth of depravity that issued forth in the 20th century after Darwin’s theory took hold. The oppression of communism went on so long, it encompassed whole lifetimes in misery and despair. It’s a sorry verdict on our education system’s failure that so many today are embracing socialism, the halfway house to communism. The Big Science institutions as well have so soon forgotten the horrors of eugenics. It’s good that books are still coming out about these two evil fruits of Darwinian ideology, but so many forget (or never heard) about them. Encourage young people to read George Orwell’s Animal Farm. No student is educated without it (the young may enjoy the classic cartoon version). Encourage your friends and family members and fellow students to watch the Discovery Institute’s excellent videos about Social Darwinism, where clear lines are drawn from Darwin to eugenics, Hitler and communism. We must never forget!Matthew 7:15 “Beware of the false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly are ravenous wolves. 16 You will know them by their fruits. Grapes are not gathered from thorn bushes nor figs from thistles, are they? 17 So every good tree bears good fruit, but the bad tree bears bad fruit. 18 A good tree cannot produce bad fruit, nor can a bad tree produce good fruit. 19 Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. 20 So then, you will know them by their fruits.”  —Jesus Christ, from the Sermon on the Mount (Visited 99 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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10 months agoYan Valery proud of Southampton breakthrough

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Yan Valery proud of Southampton breakthroughby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveYan Valery is delighted to have made his debut for Southampton.The 19-year-old right back has graduated from Saints’ under-23 side to regular first team action in the space of six weeks. He told the Daily Echo: “Obviously, I wanted to become the first choice right back at Southampton.“I can’t say I could see it coming, but I was ready and waiting for it. It’s been amazing.“I’ve worked hard in the under-23’s and we were doing great this season. I wanted to improve myself and become a better player.“I’ve been playing a lot and the manager has shown me that he trusts me, so I’ve been really pleased with it.“I just wanted to give it back on the pitch, so it’s been really good.“If you are the first choice right-back in the Premier League then you can start thinking about the national team as well.“I’ve got a lot of dreams and targets but the main one was to be the first choice right-back at this club.“It’s been a really big month for me and my family, they are really proud of it.” last_img read more

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