This door lock knows when you switch your browser to Porn Mode

first_imgWhat you do in your web browser when you switch it to porn mode is your own business. As long as nobody comes along and opens up the door unexpectedly. If only there was some way to ensure that you’d never find yourself in that situation. Maybe someone clever will invent something that keeps unexpected guests from bursting in on you when you’re at your most vulnerable… or least clothed… or both!Well, now there is, thanks to the brilliant minds at the Useless Duck Company!Yes, the same people who brought you the only automatic toilet paper dispenser that’s officially endorsed by Ash Williams (well, it would be if Ash was a real person, anyway) have now invented a physical privacy tool that works in conjunction with your browser’s software privacy tools.It’s a door lock that automatically engages when you flip the private browsing switch. You know, to shop for engagement rings without your fiancee finding out… and other far more believable uses for private browsing mode. Like checking your second Gmail account and whatnot.Ordinarily you might lock your door manually to make sure you won’t be disturbed. If, however, you happen to forget then Useless Duck’s auto-lock has your back…. which, as the company notes on the YouTube video, is super handy if you don’t want your wife to catch you shopping — or doing that other thing that ends in”pping” and rhymes with tapping.Once you’ve finished… your shopping… the lock automatically opens back up, because you don’t want people encountering a locked door unless it’s absolutely necessary. That just leads to a whole bunch of questions that no one really wants to hear the answers to.last_img read more

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Dark Matter at Center of Dwarf Galaxies Heats Up Moves

first_img Researchers Will Probe ‘Euclid Dark Fields’ to Spot Universe’s Far ObjectsWe just Discovered A Galaxy Without Dark Matter, Proving it Exists Scientists found evidence that dark matter can be heated and moved around, as a result of star formation in galaxies.Studying the hypothetical form of matter, a team of researchers from the University of Surrey, Carnegie Mellon University, and ETH Zürich turned their focus on nearby dwarf galaxies.Small, faint, and typically found orbiting larger star systems like our Milky Way, dwarf galaxies could shine some light on the nature of dark matter.Aside from being the title of a stellar novel by Blake Crouch, dark matter is thought to account for a majority of the matter in the Universe. Named because the substance does not appear to interact with observable light, it can be detected only through its gravitational effects.But the key to understanding it, according to the University of Surrey, may lie in how stars are formed in dwarf galaxies.As stars form, gas and dust is blown away from the heart of the galaxy, leaving the core with less matter; that, in turn, affects how much gravity is felt by the remaining dark matter.Less gravitational attraction means more dark matter energy, allowing the material to migrate away from the nebula’s center—an effect known as “dark matter heating.”Scientists found evidence that dark matter can be heated up and moved around, as a result of star formation in galaxies (via University of Surrey)Led by Surrey professor Justin Read, the international team measured the amount of dark matter at the middle of 16 dwarf galaxies with very different star formation histories.Their findings, published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, suggest that galaxies which stopped forming stars long ago had higher dark matter densities than those still popping out celestial bodies.“We found a truly remarkable relationship between the amount of dark matter at the centers of these tiny dwarfs, and the amount of star formation they have experienced over their lives,” Read, head of the Department of Physics at the University of Surrey, said in a statement. “The dark matter at the centers of the star-forming dwarfs appears to have been ‘heated up’ and pushed out.”The first observational evidence for dark matter heating, this data also provides a new constraint on scientific models: Dark matter must be able to form dwarf galaxies that exhibit a range of central densities, which must relate to the amount of star formation.“This study may be the ‘smoking gun’ evidence that takes us a step closer to understanding what dark matter is,” co-author Matthew Walker of Carnegie Mellon University said. “Our finding that it can be heated up and moved around helps to motivate searches for a dark matter particle.”Moving forward, the group plans to expand their work by measuring the central dark matter density in a larger sample of dwarf galaxies and a wider range of dark matter models.More on Geek.com:We Just Discovered a Galaxy Without Dark Matter, Proving It ExistsWe May Have Just Glimpsed Dark Matter, About 240 Million Light Years AwayHow Do We Know Dark Matter And Dark Energy Exist? Stay on targetlast_img read more

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