Are The Giants Sneaking Up On Us Again

In 2007, the Giants’ passing attack through 10 games wasn’t very good (and it would only get worse: The team finished the regular season at 22nd in adjusted net yards per attempt and 24th in passer rating). The running game (more on this in a minute) is what powered the team. But Eli Manning had some of his best games in the playoffs, particularly in the first two games.In 2011, the Giants were defined by the passing offense: Manning had one of his best seasons, teaming with wide receivers Victor Cruz and Hakeem Nicks. Manning again played better in the postseason, particularly in the early rounds.This year? Despite highlights from Manning and Odell Beckham Jr. and the success of rookie Sterling Shepard, the Giants have had a mediocre passing attack. They rank 19th in passing EPA and 16th in ANY/A. There’s obvious upside with Manning and Beckham, but if the Giants go on a Super Bowl run, the data suggests that the passing offense won’t be behind it.Rushing offense In 2007, the Giants’ offense was centered around Brandon Jacobs and Derrick Ward, with spot appearances by Reuben Droughns and rookie Ahmad Bradshaw. The ground game ranked fourth in yards and yards per carry.But even though the Earth, Wind and Fire Giants carried over their rushing success into 2008, the running game has been more of a weakness than a strength in more recent years. In 2011, the Giants finished dead last in both yards and yards per carry. And once again, the Giants can’t seem to piece together a running game. This season, New York ranks 31st in yards and 30th in yards per carry, with the underwhelming Rashad Jennings the leader in an unimpressive committee. The veteran back is averaging an anemic 3.40 yards per carry, 38th out of 43 qualifying rushers.With this year’s Giants featuring a mediocre passing game and a bad running game, you’ve probably figured out that it’s not the offense carrying the team.Pass defense It’s easy to dismiss the success of the 7-3 New York Giants. The team ranks 23rd in scoring, tied with the 49ers, and is 11th in points allowed; overall, the Giants have outscored opponents by only 4 points all year. In fact, the Giants haven’t won a single game by more than 7 points. Meanwhile, they rank 20th in yards per game and 16th in yards allowed per game and have benefited from a favorable schedule: The team has played only three true road games this year.1The Giants have played six games at home; they also played one game in London, against the Rams.Ahead of Week 11’s games, the Giants ranked 16th in both ESPN’s NFL Power Rankings and Football Outsiders’ Defense-adjusted Value Over Average, and their 6-point home win against a bad Bears team is unlikely to move those needles. And even after Sunday’s win, the Giants rank only 17th in FiveThirtyEight’s NFL Elo ratings.So the Giants are just an average team that has lucked into a good record, right? That’s an easy conclusion, but the Giants have a history of sneaking up on the rest of the NFL, as they did in 2007 and 2011:In 2007, New York was 7-3 through 10 games but imploded in the team’s 11th game. Against Minnesota, Eli Manning threw three pick sixes (he would finish the year with 20 picks, tied for the league lead).In 2011, the Giants through 10 games had scored 228 points and allowed 228 points, leading to a 6-4 record.At the time, neither of those teams seemed very noteworthy, and they finished with 10-6 and 9-7 records, respectively. Our current simulations have this year’s Giants finishing with 9.9 wins, which would put them right in line with those other good but not great Giants teams.Of course, both of those Giants teams wound up winning the Super Bowl. Is there any reason to think this year’s team could similarly surprise in the playoffs? To find out, let’s use expected points added to measure how the Giants have fared in every season (through 10 games) going back to 2006.2The first year for which we have EPA data. And while EPA does not adjust for era, we have adjusted those numbers on a per-play basis to account for those differences. I took an average of the per-play EPA for passing and rushing plays from 2006 to 2016 and then adjusted each season of team EPA data based on how the per-play average in a given season differed from the per-play average overall.Pass offense The 2007 and 2011 Giants were both strong against the run, but this year’s squad is even stronger. The Giants currently rank eighth in rushing yards allowed per game and fifth in yards per carry allowed. The additions of Harrison and Vernon have transformed the defensive line, after the defense ranked in the bottom half of the league in most rushing categories last year.ConclusionThe defense is the clear strength of this year’s Giants team, and it’s in a better position through 10 games than the defenses were during those Super Bowl-winning seasons. That’s a good thing, because unlike in those championship seasons, Eli Manning and the Giants offense are playing at or below league average — not exactly in position to carry a team on a late-season winning streak. So if the Giants make a run for the Super Bowl, it may be less likely to resemble Eli Manning’s two Super Bowl teams and more likely to resemble Eli’s brother’s team last year.Check out our latest NFL predictions. The most enduring image of the 2007 Giants is likely the beating that the team gave Tom Brady and the undefeated New England Patriots, but it’s easy to forget that through 10 games, that team was below average against the pass. Same goes for the 2011 version, which was among the worst teams in the league at defending the pass until it got its act together down the stretch.Last year, the pass defense was the Giants’ downfall — the team ranked 28th in EPA and 29th in ANY/A allowed, factors that led to the team finishing 30th in points allowed and last in yards allowed. The Giants finished 6-10, with opposing quarterbacks leading five fourth-quarter comebacks against them and a sixth loss involving another blown lead in the final minute.In the offseason, the Giants spent a ton of money to improve the defense. The team re-signed Jason Pierre-Paul; added Olivier Vernon, Janoris Jenkins and Damon Harrison; and drafted cornerback Eli Apple in the first round. Those additions have paid dividends, and safety Landon Collins, selected 33rd overall last year, has been a huge part of the team’s turnaround. This year, the Giants rank eighth in pass EPA and fifth in ANY/A allowed, and the pass defense is the strength of the team in a way it hasn’t been in years.Rush defense read more

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Scientists record first video of the 100nm space under an impacting Leidenfrost

first_img Journal information: Physical Review Letters © 2016 Phys.org Now researchers have filmed the first videos of the tiny (less than 100 nm) levitation space between the hot surface and the impacting liquid droplet, in this case not of water but ethanol and fluorinated heptane. The videos allow the researchers to directly observe, for the first time, how the shape of the droplet base changes as the surface temperature approaches the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature. This temperature varies depending on the type of liquid and increases with the impact velocity of the droplet.The researchers, Minori Shirota, et al., from the Physics of Fluids group at University of Twente, have published a paper on their investigation of the dynamic Leidenfrost effect in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.To film the levitation space, the researchers used a technique called total internal reflection (TIR) imaging. By reflecting a laser beam off mirrors and into a prism at a particular angle, the researchers could transmit the resulting laser light through the droplets. This procedure creates grayscale images of dark wet droplets that visibly stand out against the lighter dry area, allowing the researchers to see where the droplet comes in contact with the surface, if at all. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play An ethanol droplet impacts on a sapphire substrate at 150 °C. In the lower image, the top half shows the TIR image in original grayscale, while the lower half shows the calculated color height. The red color corresponds to a very low height, meaning that most of the droplet is in contact with the surface. Credit: Shirota, et al. ©2016 American Physical Society One of the most useful pieces of information obtained from the imaging is that the shape of the droplet base is not flat, as sometimes assumed, but ring-shaped. The scientists describe it as a “dimple and neck structure” in contrast to the previous “pancake model” that describes a flat bottom. The pancake model cannot accurately describe observations, and its incorrect assumption of a flat droplet bottom may explain why. “Drop impact on a superheated surface is of key importance in various applications,” coauthor Chao Sun, Physics Professor at the University of Twente, told Phys.org. “A quantitative physical understanding of the phenomenon is, however, lacking. In this work, we show that the whole impact dynamics is determined by the dimple and neck formation beneath the droplet at the very beginning of the impacting process.”From the TIR images, the researchers could quantitatively define three different boiling regimes (contact, transition, and Leidenfrost) as the temperature increases at the various impact conditions. Previous research has loosely classified these three regimes based on somewhat superficial factors such as the number of tiny droplets ejected by the main droplet. Explore further Play An ethanol droplet impacts on a sapphire substrate at 180 °C. There are more blue colors than at 150 °C, indicating that parts of this droplet are higher above the surface. Credit: Shirota, et al. ©2016 American Physical Society Here, however, the TIR imaging allows the researchers to calculate values such as the incident angle and the spreading radius of the droplet in order to generate a clearer picture and a more precise definition of the regime boundaries and associated transition temperatures. The improved understanding of the Leidenfrost effect could have a variety of industrial applications. More information: Minori Shirota, Michiel A. J. van Limbeek, Chao Sun, Andrea Prosperetti, and Detlef Lohse, “Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.064501, Also at arXiv:1511.04974 [physics.flu-dyn] A 2-mm-diameter ethanol droplet impacts on a hot surface. The corresponding videos with TIR images showing the droplet height are below. Credit: Shirota, et al. ©2016 American Physical Society “Heat transfer from solid surfaces to impacting liquid droplets plays an important role in many industrial technologies such as power electronics cooling, spray cooling, engine performance, and pollutant emissions,” said coauthor Detlef Lohse, Physics Professor at the University of Twente.In the future, the researchers plan to use their observations of the dimple and neck structure to develop more accurate models of the dynamic Leidenfrost temperatures for various types of liquids. A heat-seeking slingshot: Liquid droplets show ability to cool extremely hot surfaces Play An ethanol droplet impacts on a sapphire substrate at 220 °C. The red half circle shows the area of the spreading droplet, and the lack of color indicates that the droplet is high above the surface (greater than 91 nm, the TIR cut-off height). Credit: Shirota, et al. ©2016 American Physical Society “We aim to quantitatively and theoretically understand the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature, and plan to investigate the effects of the surrounding pressure on this fascinating phenomenon,” said Sun and Lohse. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen (Phys.org)—There are many cool videos showing the Leidenfrost effect, which occurs when water droplets levitate and skid around on top of a very hot surface, rather than immediately evaporating like they do at temperatures that are not quite as hot. The effect occurs because the bottom of the droplet rapidly vaporizes as it approaches the hot surface, causing the droplet to levitate on top of its own vapor. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Citation: Scientists record first video of the 100-nm space under an impacting Leidenfrost droplet (2016, February 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-02-scientists-video-nm-space-impacting.htmllast_img read more

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