COVID-19: East Java denies entry to Viking Sun cruise ship, passengers

first_imgRisma said in a letter that Viking Sun passengers were only allowed to disembark from the ship at Tanjung Perak Port after undergoing a laboratory check, the results of which would be known two days after the test.“However, it is impossible to do [the test] as the Viking Sun only docks in Surabaya for less than 10 hours,” Risma said in a letter, which also stipulated the restriction on the ship’s crew and passengers from disembarking at the port.The restriction will also be applicable to other cruise ships with travel histories to countries with confirmed COVID-19 cases.An official at Tanjung Perak harbormaster’s office Rony Fahmi said the office would follow up the decision: “We decided to deny entry to the Viking Sun cruise ship following a meeting with other institutions.”Read also: Four Indonesians in Japan recover from COVID-19: MinisterState-owned port operator PT Pelabuhan Indonesia III (Pelindo III) vice president Wilis Aji Wiranata said the company would comply with the administrations’ decision.“Our initial plan was to dispatch officials from the port health authority to check on the passengers and crews’ health before they disembarked from the ship. This would be done if the cruise ship is allowed to dock [in Surabaya],” Wilis said.The MV Viking Sun previously docked in Labuan Bajo, East Nusa Tenggara, on Monday. The cruise ship’s captain stated in its Maritime Declaration of Health that all people aboard the ship had been declared healthy.Nevertheless, East Nusa Tenggara health authorities screened all passengers and crew when the ship docked in Labuan Bajo.According to Pelindo III, the MV Viking Sun will continue its voyage to Benoa Port in Bali after docking in Surabaya. The boat will dock at Benoa until Mar. 10 and sail to Lombok the next day, before returning to Surabaya on Mar. 14. After that, the ship will sail to Sri Lanka, where it is scheduled to arrive on Mar. 20. (dpk)Topics : “During a meeting yesterday, we decided not to accept the ship’s request to moor at Tanjung Perak Port to prevent mass panic among citizens,” East Java health agency head Herlin Ferliana told The Jakarta Post on Thursday.Read also: Cruise control? Securitizing luxury cruise ships in times of coronavirusThe decision was echoed by Surabaya Mayor Tri “Risma” Rismaharini, who claimed to have received information that two passengers aboard the ship were suffering from a cold and fever. The passengers recently traveled to New Caledonia and Australia, which is among the countries to have recorded confirmed COVID-19 cases.According to data compiled by the John Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering, Australia had recorded 52 confirmed COVID-19 cases as of Thursday afternoon. To date, two have died from the disease, while 11 others have recovered. As many as 800 tourists from the United States and Australia aboard the MV Viking Sun cruise ship will not be able to visit Surabaya, East Java, as the Surabaya and East Java administrations have denied the cruise ship entry to the city.The Norwegian-flagged cruise ship, carrying 1,395 passengers and crew, initially planned to dock at Tanjung Perak Port in the provincial capital on Friday.The East Java administration rejected the ship’s request to dock at Tanjung Perak as East Java Governor Khofifah Indar Parawansa made the decision not to jeopardize the health of locals.last_img read more

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Syracuse midfielder Taylor Poplawski relies on aggressiveness to counter short frame

first_imgTaylor Poplawski was too small. She couldn’t play lacrosse. She wouldn’t be good at it, people told her throughout her childhood.Though Poplawski, a fourth-grader at the time, didn’t even know what lacrosse was, she wanted to play.“I was like, ‘You know what? Screw you guys, I’m going to play anyway,’” Poplawski said. “… It lit a fire under my seat. I just wanted to show them all wrong.”Poplawski is only 5 feet, 2 inches, but has used a tough and aggressive playing style to succeed on the lacrosse field. She won two state championships during high school and now plays on the second-line midfield for No. 9 Syracuse (9-6, 2-4 Atlantic Coast).During starting midfielder Kelly Cross’ suspension, Poplawski has expanded her role beyond just a second-line midfielder. In the last three games, she’s picked up three draw controls and three ground balls and on the season, she’s recorded six goals after switching from the attack last season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“She’s super athletic, super quick, great on ground balls,” SU head coach Gary Gait said. “(She’s a) hustler.”Poplawski was not a typical little girl, her stepfather, John Poplawski said. She liked climbing trees, playing with snakes and getting dirty.When Poplawski started playing soccer, she was better than the boys.“I’d always be like, ‘Oh, she’s so aggressive no one’s going to like her,’” said Tina Poplawski, her mother.But her stepfather embraced the aggressiveness. He and Poplawski wrestled in the living room or yard from when she was 4 until she was 10 or 11 years old.In gym class, she was sometimes too aggressive, knocking kids down while pegging classmates with the kickball. Though she’d get in trouble with her teacher, her stepfather contested that there was no such thing as being too aggressive.Poplawski saw a flier for the lacrosse team in fourth grade and told her parents she wanted to play. She showed up to her first lacrosse practice with a men’s stick, pads and a helmet, that her stepfather had borrowed from the coach at the school he worked at. The coach didn’t realize Poplawski was a girl, not a boy.“‘She’s a very natural player, but she’ll need a girls’ stick,” Tina Poplawski recalls Poplawski’s first coach saying.When Poplawski started playing lacrosse, John Poplawski learned how to play too, and soon became her coach.He’d line the yard with Pepsi bottles and make Poplawski weave through them while his 6-foot-3, 350-pound frame pushed against her. Tina Poplawski would yell at her husband that he was being too rough and was going to hurt Poplawski.“You have to play big, you’re little,” Tina Poplawski remembers her husband telling her daughter.Tough and aggressive were characteristics of Poplawski’s playing style. Bruises were like trophies to her, John Poplawski said.On the lacrosse field, the aggressiveness meant dodging past bigger players so much so that he would move her back to defense when the games got out of hand.Poplawski led Christian Brothers (New York) Academy to two state championships during her sophomore and senior years, earning championship most valuable player each time.At Syracuse, Poplawski has focused on gaining as much muscle weight as she can as another way to go up against bigger competition.“I try and bulk up so I’m not like a paperweight out there,” Poplawski said.Her strength and aggressiveness have combined to help her get to ground balls and draw controls from bigger players.Though she’s had success at Syracuse, Gait doesn’t think she’s reached her peak. The on-field effects produced by her aggressiveness and toughness will be crucial as the Orange — which has lost four of its last five games — approaches the end of its season.“Her best lacrosse is yet to come I think,” he said. “I’m excited about that.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 14, 2015 at 9:38 pm Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettuslast_img read more

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