10 money tips millennials need to survive in 2016

first_imgThe new year typically encourages millennials to change old habits and aspire to be a better version of themselves. You’ll often hear resolutions to get physically fit, save money or a plethora of other financially driven New Year’s resolutions in order to lead a more balanced lifestyle in 2016.But some millennials need help achieving their 2016 financial goals. A 2015 Millennial Money Mindset Report, led by iQuantifi in partnership with Middle Tennessee State University, found that 41% of millennials said that in the next three to five years, their goal is to “Increase my overall level of savings.” The problem is that millennials carry an average debt of $47,689, according to the report.To make sure millennials have a viable chance at accomplishing their financial goals next year, GOBankingRates interviewed the best money experts of 2015 to get their most important money tips that millennials can use today. continue reading » 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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‘Devastated’ Hales reps criticise ECB

first_imgALEX Hales’ representatives say he is “devastated” by the England and Wales Cricket Board’s (ECB) decision to remove him from their preliminary World Cup squad.Hales was included in the 15-man squad for the tournament on home soil, but it emerged last week that he had been sanctioned under the ECB’s disciplinary policy for a second time.A report in The Guardian newspaper said the hard-hitting batsman was serving a 21-day ban from cricket for recreational drug use.The 30-year-old has been stood down from this Friday’s one-off one-day international against Ireland in Malahide, the upcoming limited-overs matches against Pakistan and the World Cup, which starts on May 30.Hales’s management company, the 366 Group, said the player was “devastated” after assurances from the ECB were apparently “rendered meaningless”.It said in a statement: “We are hugely disappointed at the treatment of our client, Alex Hales, by the ECB.“The ECB insisted on Alex taking certain rehabilitation measures following his suspension. In line with both the ECB and PCA (Professional Cricketers’ Association) guidelines, those measures must remain confidential.“However, at every stage, Alex fulfilled his obligations and both he and his representatives were given assurances that any suspension, again under the ECB’s guidelines, could not affect his selection for the World Cup.”Hales’s latest misdemeanour comes just a few months after he was suspended and fined by the ECB for his part in a street brawl in Bristol also involving Ben Stokes in September 2017.Ashley Giles, ECB managing director of England Men’s Cricket, said: “We have thought long and hard about this decision.“We have worked hard to create the right environment around the England team and need to consider what is in the best interests of the team, to ensure they are free from any distractions and able to focus on being successful on the pitch.“I want to make it clear this is not the end of Alex’s career as an England player.”Hales has played 11 Tests, 70 one-day internationals and 60 Twenty20 internationals but is now regarded as a white-ball specialist.`last_img
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Power plays lead Syracuse comeback against Lindenwood

first_imgWith a 5-on-3 player advantage, Syracuse passed back-and-forth below the goal line, maintaining possession. Eventually, the puck cycled back to the point, where Lindsay Eastwood stood alone. She drifted toward the left face-off circle, and given time and space, Eastwood fired a wrister. Traffic in front of the net prevented Lindenwood’s goalie, Sophie Wolf, from seeing it, and the shot snuck in for Eastwood’s third power play goal this season. This one narrowed the deficit to one goal two minutes into the third period.Fifty-four seconds later, Emma Polaski scored her team-leading fourth power play goal of the season to tie the game at 4-4. Syracuse (9-19-3, 9-6-2 College Hockey America) then completed the comeback against Lindenwood (7-19-3, 3-12-2) in overtime, 5-4, on an Abby Moloughney penalty shot. After going 0 for 8 on the player advantage last weekend in two games versus the Rochester Institute of Technology, the Orange converted three times in five chances Friday night against the worst team in CHA. “They’re always looking for me to shoot,” Eastwood said. “So, first things first, I’m looking for the shot.”Power plays sparked the crucial scoring run as SU tries to hold on to third-place in the conference standings. RIT remains three points behind the Orange, while Mercyhurst holds a two-point advantage. Syracuse has three games remaining before the CHA tournament in Buffalo, which starts March 6. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It’s really close with the points, it’s really narrow,” Moloughney said. “And I think that to get an extra point is something that everyone wants, and we just had to really take it.” Lindenwood committed penalties at opportune times for Syracuse. The Lions took the lead in the first period, but 1:40 after its opening goal, Megan Wagner went to the box for tripping. The Orange had already controlled much of the possession to that point of the game, and the power play chance allowed them even more space to operate. They didn’t waste it like last weekend. Polaski took the puck by the boards nearest the fans and flung a cross-ice pass to defender Jessica DiGirolamo. On Syracuse’s power play, one of the defenders stays at the point, quarterbacking the unit, and the other defender is given free reign to stray toward the net or patrol the face-off circle. In this instance, DiGirolamo chose to attack the net. She received the pass, and in the same motion, roofed a shot over Wolf to tie the game. “We have a really strong connection,” DiGirolamo said on Polaski. “It starts in practice and then today, when I scored my goal, it was all of Emma’s work.”The Lions scored two unanswered goals in the second period to take a 4-2 lead into the third frame. Early in the period, though, Lindenwood’s Lillian Marchant took a hooking penalty. Then, Shannon Morris-Reade slashed a Syracuse player’s stick out of her hands, earning two minutes in the box. Eastwood and Polaski’s markers on the ensuing power plays brought the score even. Even when not scoring, Syracuse’s passing and movement to get open troubled Lindenwood and forced tough saves from Wolf. The Orange took more chances on cross-ice feeds and trying to find open players, and Allie Munroe was instrumental in facilitating motion in the offensive zone. “We’re really connecting on our passes,” Eastwood said. “We’re actually making tape-to-tape, which makes a huge difference. It keeps the control, one, and gets the other team scrambling.”Munroe and Eastwood are the two point defenders that quarterback their respective power play units. Eastwood said the two are different players, which gives the opposition different looks. Eastwood is shoot-first, she said, while Munroe is poised and patient with the puck. On the first Syracuse player advantage of the night, Munroe rotated the puck between the wings, and when given the opportunity to shoot, often faked it. Lindenwood players went down to block shots — Munroe finished the game with nine shot attempts — and the senior captain instead slid passes to Orange players by the side of the net. “We’re different hockey players, different styles, so different things are going to come from both of us,” Eastwood said. Syracuse has the most-effective power play in CHA, leading the league in special-team goals (27). DiGirolamo said the Orange have better positioning than earlier in the year, and they’re getting open to provide outlets when players are pressured. “We’re looking for different options,” DiGirolamo said. “So keep your head up and find the right play.” Comments Published on February 22, 2019 at 11:56 pm Contact Arabdho: [email protected] | @aromajumder center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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