Charity Times Awards nomination deadline extended

first_imgCharity Times Awards nomination deadline extended The deadline for nominations for the Charity Times Awards 2008 have been extended to 23 June.The Awards are free to enter, and you can nominate yourself, a colleague or a professional service provider who you feel has provided outstanding services to the sector.As well as Trustee Board of the Year, Fundraising Team of the Year and Campaigning Team of the Year there are new team categories this year for the Finance Team and the Human Resources Team.The organisers have also introduced one new award which focuses specifically on corporate partnerships, and another which looks at effective use of the web and web technologies.www.charitytimes.com/pages/charity_times_awards Howard Lake | 11 June 2008 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Awards  23 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Lloyds Banking Group chooses Alzheimer’s Society and Alzheimer Scotland for charity of the year partnership

first_imgLloyds Banking Group chooses Alzheimer’s Society and Alzheimer Scotland for charity of the year partnership Howard Lake | 13 January 2013 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Paul Turner, Group Community & Sustainable Business Director at Lloyds Banking Group, said: “Our colleagues voted overwhelmingly to partner with the Alzheimer’s Society and Alzheimer Scotland in support of their first ever national dementia carers programme. Lloyds Banking Group is part of the Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia and is committed to understanding the needs of customers living with dementia to ensure they are given as much independence as possible while supporting their financial needs.” Leonard Cheshire Disability was the runner-up in the staff vote and received a donation of £10,000 from the Group.www.lloydsbankinggroup.com/community/charity_of_the_year.aspcenter_img  26 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Lloyds Banking Group has chosen Alzheimer’s Society and Alzheimer Scotland as its Charity of the Year Partnership for 2013 and 2014. The charities were selected in a staff vote. The funds raised during the partnership will help the charity to launch ‘Live Well’, its first UK-wide dementia carers programme.Lloyds Banking Group’s previous two year charity of the year partnership was with Save the Children. Having set a target of £2 million, it raised over £3.4 million to fund the charity’s Families and Schools Together (FAST) programme in the UK. Successful fundraising activities in this campaign included an Everest Base Camp trek, which raised £250,000, and a one-day takeover of 100 Save the Children charity shops which raised £70,000. Advertisement Tagged with: charity of the year corporatelast_img read more

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Don’t overlook a key strategic asset in call centre staff

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Outsourcing a big segment of routine HR responsibilities to a call centrecan be beneficial, but companies must remember to invest as much in their callcentre employees as they would in any new investment or serviceGetting bums on seats is a splendid tenet for the world of entertainment.But when transferred from theatre land to the call centre workplace, therecould hardly be a more appalling principle. Why is it then that despite protestations across the call centre industry tothe contrary, ‘rope ’em in, stack ’em high and drive ’em hard’ is still theprevailing approach to their staff? Call centres continue to be notorious for their churn, with average staffturnover around 32 per cent. Companies are still putting their entire destiniesinto the hands of their worst-trained, worst-paid and worst-motivated people. Workers’ tasks are crushingly boring and repetitive, they are subjected toviolent outbursts from frustrated callers, they operate withinstrictly-controlled regimes, they have no scope or encouragement to developindividual skills, and their sense of fulfilment is zero. In such an atmosphere employees are principally concerned with their ownsurvival rather than care for the customer. But then self-preservation is arguably no more than natural in anenvironment where 6 per cent of the workforce suffers from serious psychiatricproblems – double the rate for the general working population. The trouble from the company’s point of view is that call centre staff livewith their customers – its lifeblood – every day, and it is from them thatcustomers form their image. Furthermore, with call centres often the only interface between business andthe outside world, they are increasingly becoming an organisation’s soleshowcase, with the abilities and attitudes of staff playing a vital part inbuilding the brand and consumer trust in that brand. We live in an age when the way companies care for and present themselves totheir patrons can be a significant competitive differentiator, and those thatfail to adequately invest in their staff will weaken their market position andultimately endanger their survival. Yet they continue to subject employees to the relentless strain of quotas,judging them by the quantity of their daily contacts rather than the quality ofhow they interact with callers. If people are poorly trained and poorly treated, the result is high levelsof staff turnover and low levels of service, which is why the issue of calibreand retention of employees should be on every board’s agenda. It is also whyboards must become far more closely involved in how centres are run and manned.After all, ensuring that maximum return is derived from an organisation’smost valuable asset is within the compass of its directors. Companies must regard their call centre workforces as a strategic asset andapply as much focus to investment in people as they would to an important newproduct or service. That means senior executives directly participating inrecruitment, training, development and working environment and not leaving itsolely to the subordinate strata of HR and call centre management. Where management has imposed a systems strategy, boards should superimpose apeople strategy. They should also closely engage themselves in selectionpolicies and candidate quality and in how staff are taught, handled andencouraged to fulfil their potential. As part of that, they should ensure employees are armed with the personaland inter-personal skills that underpin relationships, and are empowered tobecome knowledge workers, with a wide availability of information and mediachannels, rather than script-reading robots. Above all, at the forefront of their minds they should carry the maxim thatthe way to a customer’s heart lies not in software and systems, but in people.And for the company that values its future, something more is needed thanmerely bums on seats. By Glenn Hurley, chairman of hosted contact centre specialists [email protected] Don’t overlook a key strategic asset in call centre staffOn 25 Jun 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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