Gallery Home / Elding Oscarson

first_imgCopyHouses•Lidingö, Sweden Projects Manufacturers: Muuto, Plannja, Vitra, Vola, SanovaSave this picture!© Mikael OlssonRecommended ProductsWindowsOTTOSTUMM | MOGSWindow Systems – BronzoFinestra B40StonesNeolithSintered Stone – Arctic White – Colorfeel CollectionWindowsVEKAWindows – SOFTLINE 82 ADWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityText description provided by the architects. By coincidence when looking for a larger flat, the art-loving clients came across a plot with an 8-car underground garage on the island Lidingö, just outside Stockholm. Apart from the submerged garage, the plot was empty. This was not what they were looking for, yet it felt just right – soon a dream of a house with an integrated gallery started to form.Save this picture!© Mikael OlssonSave this picture!SectionSave this picture!© Mikael OlssonSave this picture!SectionThrough a cost conscious process and an attempt to benefit from what was already built on site, a large portion of the original garage has been appropriated for indoor climate. The garage structure has been altered by cutting open the roof slab, connecting it to the new building above and leading down ample daylight. While the first upper floor divides naturally into four bedrooms of various sizes, arranged around a central spiral stair under a skylight, the ground floor is a singular large room. With daylight and views from all four facades and a generous height under its tightly pitched plywood beams, this space is blending with the nature and trees surrounding it.Save this picture!© Mikael OlssonProject gallerySee allShow lessFoster + Partners Breaks Ground on Shanghai Suhewan SkyscraperArchitecture NewsNursery School at Roches de Condrieu / Brenas Doucerain ArchitectesSelected Projects Share 2018 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/902665/gallery-home-elding-oscarson Clipboard Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/902665/gallery-home-elding-oscarson Clipboard Photographs ArchDaily “COPY” Gallery Home / Elding Oscarsoncenter_img Save this picture!© Mikael Olsson+ 14Curated by Diego Hernández Share Architects: Elding Oscarson Area Area of this architecture project Houses Gallery Home / Elding OscarsonSave this projectSaveGallery Home / Elding Oscarson Sweden “COPY” Area:  340 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs:  Mikael Olsson Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project CopyAbout this officeElding OscarsonOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteel#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesLidingöSwedenPublished on September 26, 2018Cite: “Gallery Home / Elding Oscarson” 26 Sep 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisPatinated Copper: Nordic Green/Blue/Turquoise/SpecialCoffee tablesFlexformCoffee Table – GipsyCurtain WallsIsland Exterior FabricatorsPace Gallery Envelope SystemWoodSculptformTimber Battens in Double Bay HouseStonesCosentinoSilestone and Dekton in Villa OmniaBricksNelissenInner Wall Bricks – LückingPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsAir Facade PanelsWoodBlumer LehmannData Processing for Wood ProjectsEducational ApplicationsFastmount®Hidden Panel Fastener at Massey UniversitySealants / ProtectorsTOPCRETMicro-Coating – Baxab®More products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?画廊之家 / Elding Oscarson是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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DC mansion murders: A look at the evidence that helped convict the killer

first_imgU.S. Dept. of Justice(WASHINGTON) —  ABC News has obtained police evidence photos and video, some of which is being made public for the first time, used to help convict the man accused in the brutal 2015 murder of three family members and their housekeeper in a Washington, D.C., mansion.Amy, Savvas and Philip Savopoulos and their housekeeper Veralicia Figueroa were killed in May 2015 in the family’s multimillion-dollar home in an elite neighborhood in the nation’s capital.The four were found in the home after it had been set on fire. Savvas, Amy and Philip Savopoulos were pronounced dead at the scene. Figueroa was given CPR and transported to a local hospital, where she was later pronounced dead.Daron Wint was convicted on charges of murder, kidnapping, burglary, extortion, arson and theft Thursday. He had pleaded not guilty to all charges.Wint was on trial for seven weeks for the home invasion and brutal killings. During the trial, his defense team claimed that his brothers had committed the murders while he unknowingly remained downstairs. Wint’s brother Darrell Wint testified against him and provided an alibi for the timeframe of the crime. He has not been charged in the case.ABC News obtained evidence photos from inside the Savopouloses’ mansion, surveillance video of Wint, a 911 call made the day of the house fire and other pieces of evidence presented during Wint’s trial.Beginning on May 13, 2015, the victims were held captive overnight as the adults were bound to chairs, beaten with a baseball bat and strangled. An autopsy found that the couple’s 10-year-old son, Philip, had been killed by “thermal and sharp-force injuries.” He was found in his bedroom.Investigators said the fire in the home had been started in Philip’s bedroom. Amy Savopoulos’ Porsche was found burning in a church parking lot in neighboring Prince George’s County, Maryland, the same afternoon as the bodies were discovered.Wint was tied to the scene after investigators found DNA evidence off a half-eaten pizza found in the home. After a nationwide manhunt, police found him on May 20, 2015, stopping his car near the Maryland-D.C. border. In it, they found “a large stack of what appeared to be $100 bills” and money orders, according to court documents.Savvas Savopoulos’ assistant Jordan Wallace testified that his boss had left him a voicemail the night before the murders, asking him to go to Savopoulos’ office the following morning for a package.Among the evidence obtained by ABC News is a surveillance video showing Wallace and Savopoulos’ colleague in a bank the next morning, May 14, 2015, as the colleague withdraws a large amount of money. Wallace says that per Savopoulos’ instructions, he then drove to the family’s home and left a package containing $40,000 on the seat of one of the cars parked in the family’s garage.Evidence photos include images of the box that held the pizza tied to Wint, a baseball bat with what appeared to be blood located in the bedroom where three of the victims were found, the remains of Amy Savopoulos’ car and the mansion after the fire had been extinguished.Prosecutors insist Wint acted alone. Wint’s sentencing hearing has been scheduled for February.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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PM Harper held discussions with Valcourt Atleo on education bill federal official

first_imgBy Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsThe final push that gave birth to the First Nation education bill currently before Parliament occurred during discussions between Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt and Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo, according to a senior federal official.Francois Ducros, Aboriginal Affairs assistant deputy minister for education and social development programs, told the Senate Aboriginal Peoples committee Wednesday evening that “discussions” occurred “over the last couple of months” between Harper, Valcourt and Atleo. Ducros didn’t say how many meetings the three actually had on the proposed education bill. When asked about the issue by APTN National News after the Senate committee hearing, Ducros referred questions to Valcourt’s office.The PMO and Valcourt’s office did not immediately respond to requests for comment sent late Wednesday evening. Harper, Valcourt and Atleo jointly announced on Feb. 7 a new education bill would be tabled in Parliament.Ducros volunteered the information after she was asked by Conservative Sen. John Wallace about the department’s discussion with the AFN over the bill. Ducros said there had been discussions with the AFN over two years.The First Nation Control of First Nation Education Act, Bill C-33, was debated for the first time on second reading in the House of Commons Wednesday. The bill is expected to go to before the Commons Aboriginal affairs committee next week.The Conservatives have moved to use time allocation to limit debate on the bill to hasten its passage through the House of Commons. It’s believed the Harper government wants to have the bill passed into law before the House rises for the summer.Valcourt issued a statement Wednesday afternoon condemning the NDP for its initial opposition to the bill.“The First Nations Control of First Nations Education Act is a constructive and necessary step towards a better future for First Nations students across the country and I am both shocked and saddened that the NDP would stand in the way of improving the lives of First Nations students for purely partisan reasons,” said Valcourt. “Thomas Mulcair and the NDP are choosing to stand with those calling to bring Canada’s economy to its knees…I am disturbed that they would play politics on the backs of First Nation children.”NDP Aboriginal affairs critic Jean Crowder has criticized the bill for giving the minister too much power over First Nation education.Mulcair met with chiefs from Quebec and Labrador this week who asked the Opposition Leader to oppose the bill.The Senate is currently conducting a pre-examination on the bill, which has yet to reach the Red Chamber.Ducros, along with Chris Rainer, Aboriginal Affairs’ director of strategic policy and planning directorate in the education branch, and Martin Reiher, acting general council and director of operations and programs in the Justice Canada’s legal services unit, appeared as witnesses before the committee.If passed, the proposed bill would guarantee funding for on-reserve education that would increase at a rate of 4.5 per cent a year. Ottawa would also add $1.2 billion in funding to education in addition to existing funding levels which are around $1.55 billion a year, said Ducros. The money would flow after the next federal election in 2016.If passed, the bill would also require First Nation schools to meet mandated standards, including ensuring all students graduating from reserve schools have recognized certificates or diplomas, receive a minimum number of instructional hours and are taught by certified teachers. The bill would also ensure all children have access to elementary and secondary education on reserves.Schools would also be required to appoint a “school inspector” responsible for ensuring the school is meeting all requirements including the academic performance of students at the institution. If a school fails to meet standards, it could be put under co-management or under third-party management by the minister on advice from a Joint Council of Education Professionals.Ducros faced questions from Sen. Lillian Dyck on the extent of the department’s consultation on the bill. Referring to recent public statements from chiefs across the country decrying the lack of consultation, Dyck pressed Ducros on whether the department had a different understanding of consultation.“We are still hearing many First Nations organizations still saying they haven’t been consulted,” said Dyck.Ducros said the department faced pressures from two fronts: the need to act quickly on improving the dire education situation on reserves and the need for consultation. Ducros said lots of talk preceded the bill, including the work of a blue-ribbon panel on education which held hearings, followed by the department’s own consultations across the country and the release of a blueprint and draft education bill last year.“With something as intimate as education you are never going to finish consultation,” said Ducros. “There is always going to be a lot of angst around something like this.”Ducros said the majority of First Nations want to work with the department on the bill and are preparing for its passing into law.“Some don’t want to work with us, but not a lot,” said Ducros.Ducros, and the two other officials, also faced questions from Sen. Wilfred Moore on the need for the education council, which will be appointed by the federal cabinet and provide advice to the minister. The council will also be the go-between during discussions on developing the regulations and funding formulas associated with the bill.“To me it looks like the white man sitting on top,” said Moore.Ducros said the education council would have no say in how First Nations decided to deliver their education systems. The education council was actually created to restrict the minister’s power, she said. Currently, contribution agreements between First Nations and the department primarily govern education on reserves. Ducros said the minister has unfettered power in these [email protected]@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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