Broadcast media forbidden to let public express views on the air

first_img Convicting “petrolgate” journalist of defamation would be disastrous, RSF says April 21, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Broadcast media forbidden to let public express views on the air Organisation Help by sharing this information September 15, 2020 Find out more March 8, 2021 Find out more RSF_en to go further TogoAfrica Togo court upholds “baseless and disproportionate” newspaper closures TogoAfrica center_img March 11, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Togo Togolese authorities urged to lift newspaper’s four-month suspension Reporters Without Borders condemns an order issued by the High Council for Broadcasting and Communication (HAAC) on 17 April banning all radio and TV programmes in which the public is allowed to express its views. The ban, prompted by comments made on the air about the president’s brother arrest on 15 April, is to remain in force until further notice.“This is a dangerous decision that seems designed to gag the media at a time of political instability,” Reporters Without Borders said. “If allowing the public to speak on the air has led to excesses, a regulatory body should encourage efforts to moderate them rather ban these programmes outright. We urge the HAAC to allow Togo’s broadcast media to resume normal programming.”The HAAC, the main broadcast media regulatory body, banned interactive programmes on “all radio and TV stations until further notice” in order “to avoid excesses.” In a communiqué, the HAAC appealed for “more restraint in the handling of news” and warned that failure to observe the ban would expose violators to disciplinary measures.The ban was prompted by the comments Togolese citizens made on the air about last week’s events including the arrest of President Faure Gnassingbé’s brother, parliamentarian and former defence minister Kpatcha Gnassingbé, on 15 April in Togo, and the discovery of an arsenal of sniper rifles and satellite telephones in raid on his home. Some 20 army officers and another of the president’s brothers, Essolizam Gnassingbé, were also arrested.In an address on national television on 17 April, President Gnassingbé said there had been an attempt “to destabilise the republic’s institutions” and stage a “coup d’état”. The media rushed to cover the story and several Togolese citizens spoke critically of a “fratricidal power struggle” in the course of programmes that went out live.The Gnassingbé family has been in power for the past 42 years in Togo. The country’s generals imposed Faure Gnassingbé as his father’s successor in 2005. His elevation to the presidency was later confirmed in an election marred by violence and a disputed result. News Receive email alerts News News Newslast_img read more

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Appeals court finds for Harvard in admissions case

first_img Major outpouring of support for University in legal battle over admissions approach Hundreds of social scientists, business executives, Nobel laureates, state attorneys general, colleges rebut group appealing judgment in favor of Harvard’s policies The First Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday affirmed Harvard’s use of race as one factor among many in its application process. The decision, issued by a two-judge panel in Boston, upheld a district court finding last year that the College’s admission practices do not discriminate against Asian American applicants and comply with prior Supreme Court rulings.“After careful review of the record, we hold … that under governing Supreme Court law Harvard’s race-conscious admissions program does not violate Title VI of the Civil Rights Act,” read part of the 104-page ruling that refuted discrimination claims by the plaintiff, Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA), a group founded by Edward Blum, who has spent decades fighting measures designed to foster diversity in higher education and elsewhere.Harvard President Larry Bacow called the decision another victory for Harvard’s mission of educating students from all backgrounds and experiences, and a recognition of the importance of diversity more broadly.“Just over a year ago, U.S. District Judge Allison Burroughs found in Harvard’s favor. Today, her decision — and the values that underlie our undergraduate admissions process — are affirmed,” said Bacow. “The consideration of race, alongside many other factors, helps us achieve our goal of creating a student body that enriches the education of every student. Diversity also represents a pathway for excellence for both Harvard and the nation.”The Boston appeals court panel affirmed Burroughs’s opinion, noting that Harvard’s admissions practices are “narrowly tailored,” and that the University does not engage in racial balancing, use race as a “mechanical plus factor,” or overlook other workable race-neutral alternatives to achieve a diverse student body. In their ruling, Chief Judge Jeffrey Howard and Judge Sandra Lynch wrote that SFFA’s claim that “Harvard elevates racial diversity above other types of diversity is not supported by the evidence,” and that by eliminating consideration of race in admissions, “the share of African American and Hispanic or other students enrolled at Harvard would decrease by 45 percent.” (Judge Juan Torruella of the appellate panel, who participated in the September hearing, died on Oct. 26.)Harvard co-lead counsel Seth Waxman ’73 said the appellate decision came at a crucial time for the country.“Now more than ever, the importance of diversity in higher education cannot be overstated. The First Circuit’s decision today confirms what we have always known to be true, and what the district court found after a three-week trial,” said Waxman. “Harvard does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, and its admissions process is consistent with decades of Supreme Court precedent.”Blum, who also is spearheading similar litigation against the University of Texas and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, said that while he was disappointed with Thursday’s ruling, he is determined to fight on. He said the lawsuit “is now on track to go up to the U.S. Supreme Court.”Support for the ruling came from the higher education sector and beyond.“Alumni know that the diversity of our fellow students was a huge contributor to what we learned at Harvard. In this time of such inequity and crisis, it is even more critical that students engage with a diverse range of backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives,” said Jeannie Park ’83, president of the Harvard Asian American Alumni Alliance and co-founding board member of the Coalition for a Diverse Harvard, groups that joined amicus briefs supporting the University, and whose combined 7,000 members represent every Harvard School. “It is gratifying that the court upheld Harvard’s ability to consider race as one of many factors in building a diverse campus, so that applicants can put forward their whole selves and be considered fully.”Kristen Clarke, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, which also submitted an amicus brief supporting Harvard, said the court has made it clear that Harvard’s admissions policies are “critical for promoting diversity, which enriches the educational environment for all students and better prepares students to thrive in an increasingly multi-ethnic society.”“Justice has prevailed once again,” said John C. Yang, president and executive director of Asian Americans Advancing Justice – AAJC which also supported Harvard with an amicus filing. “The court’s decision affirms the right for all Asian Americans to have a chance to share the whole story of who they are as part of the college admissions process because overcoming racial discrimination is a big part of a student’s story.” In an online statement, Ted Mitchell, president of the American Council on Education, called the decision “a clear win for Harvard University.”The ruling, he wrote, “is just the latest federal court decision that unambiguously respects more than four decades of U.S. Supreme Court precedent that race and ethnicity can be considered within a narrowly tailored framework as one factor in a holistic admissions review to help colleges and universities achieve the goal of a talented, diverse incoming class. We applaud in the strongest terms this ruling by the First Circuit Court of Appeals and are confident that if and when this case goes to the Supreme Court, the justices will continue to uphold the vital principle that student body diversity is a compelling governmental interest.” Relatedcenter_img Appeals court hears arguments in admissions case Plaintiff looks to overturn district court ruling that affirmed Harvard’s policies to ensure a diverse student body The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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Broome County Transit works to keep buses clean amid coronavirus

first_img“What we have done is elevated our cleaning protocol. We’re using a little bit more aggressive cleaning compounds for disinfecting,” said Kilmer. “We have standard protocols because the public transportation industry is used to dealing with concentrations of people. Certainly, COVID-19 has our attention,” said Broome County Public Transportation Commissioner Greg Kilmer. “We can keep our buses and our facilities really clean, we can constantly clean them, but we also need the public. If you’re sick, stay home, it’s better for you, it’s better for the rest of the people who don’t get cross-infected,” said Kilmer. Broome County Transit also says their buses were meant for a deep clean. While BC Transit continues to clean their buses daily, officials say they still need help from the public in preventing any illnesses from spreading. VESTAL (WBNG) — Broome County says they give more than two million rides annually, and with fears of the Coronavirus spreading, they’re working to keep buses extra clean. “They’re designed to minimize infection. We’ve got these special rubber floor surfaces that wrap around so we can mop them out,” said Kilmer. The buses also feature seats and handrails made of materials that are easy to wipe down. If you do find yourself on a public transportation bus, officials advice covering your sneezes and coughs, and be considerate of those around you.last_img read more

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