Palestinian reporter held by Israelis has been on hunger strike for past week

first_img News News June 9, 2021 Find out more RSF_en to go further RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance A reporter for Qatari broadcaster Al Jazeera, Al-Rimawi was arrested by Israeli police who were clearly looking for him when they went to his home on the night of 21 April and took him away as soon as they confirmed his identity, his wife told Al Jazeera. As he was being led away, he told her he would immediately begin a hunger strike.Held under a three-month administrative detention order for which no grounds have been provided, he has just been placed in solitary confinement.As well as reporting for Al Jazeera, Al-Rimawi has been hosting a programme called “Palestine Votes” on local media outlet J-Media, in which he covers the Palestinian parliamentary and presidential elections due to be held in May and June. J-Media also often covers Palestinians being held by the Israeli authorities and protests against Israeli settlements.This is not the first time Al-Rimawi has been detained by the Israeli authorities. After his arrest in July 2018, he was held for nearly a month and, on his release, was banned from working as a journalist for two months. At that time, he ran the West Bank branch of Al-Quds, a TV channel affiliated to Hamas.“To draw attention to his arbitrary arrest and detention, Alaa Al-Rimawi has been forced to put his life in danger by ceasing to eat,” said Sabrina Bennoui, the head of RSF’s Middle East desk. “The absence of an arrest motive confirms that there are no grounds for this journalist’s administrative detention, which should therefore be terminated at once before his health deteriorates irreversibly.”Sabreen Diab, a Palestinian freelance journalist based in the Israeli town of Tamra, has meanwhile told RSF that the Israeli authorities have yet to return the mobile phone and laptop they seized when they arrested her three weeks ago and held her overnight. Her Facebook account’s username has also been changed without her knowledge, preventing her from communicating with her contacts and posting any stories on her Facebook page. Diab was accused during interrogation of being “in contact with persons and entities hostile to Israel.”Another Palestinian journalist, freelance photographer Mohammed Atiq, was arrested by Israeli soldiers at a checkpoint while travelling by bus with his father to Jerusalem on 23 April, his father says. The family still does not know why he was arrested or where he is being held.Israel is ranked 86th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2021 World Press Freedom Index and Palestine is ranked 132nd. IsraelPalestineMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Freedom of expression Help by sharing this information IsraelPalestineMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Freedom of expression April 28, 2021 – Updated on April 30, 2021 Palestinian reporter held by Israelis has been on hunger strike for past week Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 Receive email alerts WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists June 3, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for the immediate release of Alaa Al-Rimawi, a Palestinian journalist based in the West Bank city of Ramallah who has been on hunger strike ever since his arrest by the Israeli authorities a week ago. Follow the news on Middle East – North Africa News Organisation June 8, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Kalyn Ponga a case study in what makes a State of Origin player

first_imgShare on Messenger Read more State of Origin Step forward Newcastle Knights’ fullback Kalyn Ponga: Origin player in waiting. The only surprising thing is that it’s taken Queensland so long to know it when they see it.Well, they have seen it. It’s not like it’s a secret. They know he’s purpose-built for the highest, fastest, most elite ruby league there is. And yet, they didn’t pick him last year, deeming him “not ready”. Then he was too young, presumably. Now, with respect to Kevin Walters and the greater Queensland selection committee, that is ridiculous. He’s ready. He’s ready like Darren Lockyer was ready, like Laurie Daley was. Some mature early. David Klemmer’s looked like David Klemmer from his first game. Look at Nathan Cleary; he’s Greg Alexander. There’s some who just look immediately physically there. Off the field, emotionally, they could be typically fractious colts. But on the field, they’re near-finished articles. Origin players.That’s not to say all who play Origin are Origin players. Ben Ikin debuted for Queensland in 1995 aged 18 years and 83 days old. He’ll tell you he wasn’t ready. And he’ll tell you today Ponga is. Yet Ikin wouldn’t pick Ponga in his Maroons XVII.“He’ll handle it,” says Ikin. “But why rush him? Handling Origin and starring in it are two different things. I’d roll him out next year.”Yet with Michael Morgan out and Slater’s hamstring turning 35 today, Queensland don’t have the luxury. They did in 2017 when Slater was fit but selectors stayed loyal to Darius Boyd and Corey Oates. That was a mistake. Queensland learned: when Billy Slater is fit, pick Billy Slater. As the headline in Mal Meninga’s Courier-Mail column decreed: “Don’t go silly, just pick Billy”. Share on LinkedIn Share via Email Some years ago on a footy show lost in the mists of time, former NSW Blues coach and part-time oracle, Phil Gould, coined a phrase that stuck in the rugby league lexicon and became a catch-all catch-phrase to describe the elite players therein. That phrase was: “Origin player”. There is no higher praise.What is an Origin player? What qualities does an Origin player possess that normal players do not? It’s more than being fast and strong and skilful and tough, because rugby league’s full of those guys. Rather there’s some indefinable look to an Origin player, some way they hold themselves that points to elite league intelligence. You know it when you see it. Read more Share on WhatsApp Share on Facebook Australia sport Share on Pinterest Since you’re here… Share on Twittercenter_img Guardian Australia sport newsletter: subscribe by email Well, Queensland? Look no longer, just pick Ponga.Against Melbourne Storm in Newcastle yesterday, the 20-year-old showed plenty of what he’s capable of. Not the super-flashy stuff that will set YouTube alight, but subtler, more “rugby league” touches: a soft, flick pass, torpedo spiral balls both ways. He kicked long and high, and he grubbered on the run.On his feet he was typically funky. Ponga sports a pure little hop-step, at the line, that draws players to him, just enough to create space for the runners outside. It’s under-stated. He does have the “mid-air step” of Roger Tuivasa-Sheck and Benji Marshall – it’s in his arsenal – but at the line his work is more subtle. He does what he must.In the 31st minute Ponga got himself into dummy-half and used his fast-twitch fibres to throw a fast-twitch dummy. He stepped a few different ways in the space of a telephone box, and rolled over the line with a couple on him. He nailed the conversion.His footwork made the Knights’ second try, drawing them in and creating the overlap. All week Storm would’ve looked at footage of Ponga ripping this very move, but knowing it and stopping it are two different things.Without Mitchell Pearce, Knights coach Nathan Brown had Ponga kicking, passing, driving things from first receiver and dummy-half. He’s the best player in a middling side, and if his team-mates hadn’t coughed up so much ball they may have run Storm close. As it was they were towelled up. The Knights beat the Knights more than Melbourne. Rugby league Support The Guardian Topics … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Maddison Studdon to lead NSW in women’s State of Origin with Ruan Sims injured Goodbye to Mbye as Bulldogs slump to worst start in 54 years NRL Read more It made you think: if Ponga played for Melbourne – or the Roosters or the Dragons or even the dear, sweet, free-running Canberra Raiders – and was on the end of big thundering forwards and slick ball-payers inside, running at back-peddling pigs, he could be tearing up the entire comp. He wouldn’t be “ready” – he’d be in – as Cameron Munster is in, as “the Fox” Josh Addo-Carr is in, as Nick Cotric would be in if said Fox was not.Some years ago Australia coach Bob Fulton asked Gould if 19-year-old Brad Fittler was ready to head away on a Kangaroo Tour. Fittler had played Origin. But Fulton was doing due diligence and wanted to know if the boy would handle the tour. Gould assured Fulton he would. “He’s a bit special, Freddy,” said Gould.Ponga is a bit special, too. He’s an Origin player. Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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