Doctors raise awareness & funds for hospital with charity cook off

first_img  99 total views,  1 views today Advertisement Tagged with: Fundraising ideas Scotland Melanie May | 25 May 2016 | News  100 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 Three teams of consultants from different departments of Edinburgh’s Royal Hospital for Sick Children (RHSC) have raised more than £8,700 for hospital charity Sick Kids Friends Foundation (SKFF) by swapping their stethoscopes for chef’s whites.The teams, from Haematology, Spinal Surgery/Respiratory, and Plastic Surgery, took part in an awareness raising Ready, Steady, Cook style event that saw each one cook one course of a three-course meal at the Edinburgh School of Food and Wine, guided by chef Tony Singh (pictured). The venue, ingredients, chefs and drinks for the evening were all donated free of charge, and at the end of the meal, the guests were invited to donate what they thought each course was worth.The event aimed to raise awareness of the hospital’s upcoming move to a new site to a handpicked audience of influencers and supporters. Before each course, a short film of that team’s specialism was shown, explaining what they did and the impact it had on the children they treated. The meal ended with a thank you film that explained the move, and asked the audience for their help in spreading the word.All funds raised will go towards supporting the RHSC’s move to a new, purpose built home at Little France in 2017, for which SKFF has committed to contribute £2.9million in enhancements, patient/family services and therapies.Pippa Johnston, director of fundraising and marketing at SKFF, said:“We need to tell people in Edinburgh and the surrounding area that the hospital is moving to a new site so rather than just raise money, we wanted to use this as a talking event to raise awareness – we achieved both.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 Doctors raise awareness & funds for hospital with charity cook off About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Bruce Spiegelman honored for metabolic disease research

first_img Read Full Story Bruce Spiegelman, director of the Center for Energy Metabolism and Chronic Disease at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and professor of cell biology and medicine at Harvard Medical School, has received Belgium’s most important international scientific prize for his contributions to understanding the mechanisms of metabolic disorders.Queen Mathilde of Belgium presented Spiegelman with the 2015 Health Prize of the InBev-Baillet Latour Fund at a ceremony in Brussels on April 24. The Health Prize is awarded by the InBev-Baillet Latour Fund, which “aims to reward projects of high human value that hold hope and promise for the well-being of society.” The prize includes a cash award of 250,000 euros – approximately $270,000 USD. In Europe, only the Nobel Prize carries a larger amount: $1.1 million. First awarded in 1970, the Health Prize is intended to promote not only basic research but also applications to human health.Spiegelman’s work “has revolutionized our views on the control of energy metabolism and on fat tissue,” the citation said. In a series of discoveries, he showed that fat tissue secretes hormones, identified PPAR γ, a master regulator of fat cell development, and two other regulatory proteins — PGC-1α and PRDM16. Recently he identified a new type of fat cell, the “beige” adipocyte, with important metabolic functions.“These discoveries form much of our current understanding of energy regulation and offer new perspectives for the therapy of metabolic disorders,” the citation stated. Spiegelman’s research at Dana-Farber has relevance for cancer – and the cancer-related wasting disorder, cachexia — as well as an increased understanding of mechanisms underlying obesity, diabetes, and the effects of physical exercise.“I’m pleased that our basic work on energy metabolism and fat cell development has been recognized both within and outside our field,” said Spiegelman.“This reflects great work by many of my trainees over a long period of time,” he commented. “I hope that our research will open the door to new therapies in diseases like diabetes and cancer.”last_img read more

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Florida city votes to close C.D. McIntosh coal plant by 2024

first_imgFlorida city votes to close C.D. McIntosh coal plant by 2024 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Ledger:The City Commission has five years to figure out an alternative method of providing an adequate supply of electricity.Lakeland Electric announced its plans to shut down C.D. McIntosh Unit 3 no later than fall 2024 at Monday’s utility committee meeting. It’s a matter of economics, according to Mike Beckham, LE’s assistant general manager of production.The city-owned utility has calculated that running the aging coal-powered generator costs about $20 more per megawatt hour than utilizing the natural gas-fired Unit 5. Unit 3 has been offline since February when the company discovered the 102-foot scrubber tank needed $1.4 million in emergency repairs. Beckham said the lower 22 feet of the metal exterior had significantly weakened and could have come apart at the seams.The outage was anticipated to last 45 days, but the repairs are ongoing and extensive. Unit 3 is not expected to be back up and running until May 22. Beckham warned that while Lakeland Electric does not anticipate any future work will be necessary for the scrubber, the ability to make further repairs may be limited on the debilitated structure.More: Lakeland Electric to shut down Unit 3 by fall 2024last_img read more

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Beer and Tree Houses

first_imgFirst thing you need to know when you’re building a tree house for your kids, is that you’re going to fuck up. You’re not a carpenter. Unless you are. If you are a carpenter, stop reading. This doesn’t pertain to you. Go check out This Old House or something.Good.So, yeah, you’re gonna fuck up. Not every board will be level, corners won’t match, you’ll run out of screws and start using nails, which aren’t as structurally sound as screws, so you’ll go to the hardware store for the seventh time that day for more screws.Second thing you need to know, is you need to settle down. Keep it simple. Yes, a series of tree houses throughout your backyard connected by ziplines, climbing walls and swinging bridges would be awesome. So would a big ship, perched 15 feet up in a tree with a rappelling station at the end of the plank. But let’s be realistic here, you should focus on just building a box that won’t fall down the first time your kids climb the janky ass ladder you put up hastily after your oldest stood next to you when you declared the tree house to be done, and was like, “looks cool dad, but how do we get up there?”I know all this because I’ve built two tree houses, so I’ve made a lot of mistakes. I learned so much from my first experience building a tree house, I got to make an entirely new batch of mistakes on this second tree house.Also, you should be drinking a good beer the entire time you’re operating saws and nail guns because this is America and it’s your backyard, so what’s it to you!? For me, that beer was Starr Hill’s Northern Lights IPA. Actually, I was drinking two beers, Starr Hill’s old Northern Lights and their new Northern Lights. Same brewery, same style of beer, but the new Northern Lights has a revised recipe for a totally different outcome. Kind of like my two tree houses.If you have the chance to drink the old Northern Lights and new Northern Lights side by side, I highly recommend doing so. You’ll get a peek at the evolution of the IPA within these two bottles. Starr Hill started making Northern Lights in 2007, which in beer years, was forever ago. Back then, the idea with IPAs was to make them so bitter, they actually scarred the lining of your stomach and gave you heartburn. The modern IPA, on the other hand, employs a host of new hop strains and brewing technologies and comes across as more sweet and juicy than bitter. There’s still bite, but there’s balance and more complexity than just “hoppy.”Both of Starr Hill’s Northern Lights are period-appropriate interpretations of the American IPA. The older Northern Lights is a touch bitter, with heavy notes of pine and a dry finish. The new Northern Lights is more balanced, and packed with citrus. It’s juicy and a hell of a lot more refreshing than its predecessor. I think the word I’m searching for here is, “better.” Yes, the new Northern Lights is better than the old.Maybe, like me, they learned a thing or two over the years of building tree houses. I figure if I stick with it, by the fifth or sixth tree house, I might actually know what I’m doing.last_img read more

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Guess who came to dinner

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SubseaPartner Expands UK Presence

first_imgSubseaPartner has decided to increase its presence in the UK by appointing Tore Hafte Staalesen as country manager for the UK department.Tore Staalesen moves from his role as the company CEO to focus on the UK market.In addition, SubseaPartner has appointed Cato Kydland, the company’s QHSE and risk manager to the role of the interim CEO.Cato Kydland has held several leading positions within the oil and gas industry.The management change is aligned with the company strategy to become a global dive contractor providing FPSO field support service, SubseaPartner noted.last_img read more

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