The Mortgage Market in the Potential Government Shutdown

first_img About Author: Seth Welborn Previous: Daniel Young Made Partner at Schiller, Knapp, Lefkowitz & Hertzel Next: Fraud Risk Increases Nationwide April 24, 2017 1,607 Views in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Tagged with: Government Mortgages Shutdown Trump Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / The Mortgage Market in the Potential Government Shutdown Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img The Mortgage Market in the Potential Government Shutdown The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a contributing writer for DS News. He is a Harding University graduate with a degree in English and a minor in writing, and has studied abroad in Athens, Greece. An East Texas native, he also works part-time as a photographer.  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Government Mortgages Shutdown Trump 2017-04-24 Seth Welborn The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago With the federal funding running out on Friday and a potential government shutdown looming, expect to see an impact on the mortgage industry. Access to tax documents and other government paperwork may prove difficult in the event of a shutdown.CNBC noted that “non-essential” employees, such as those that process paperwork through the Internal Revenue Service, would be furloughed during a shutdown, causing roadblocks for those applying for mortgages. Additionally, lenders would not be able to verify Social Security numbers during a shut down.”There’s no ‘Wink-wink, keep your laptops and we’ll call you,'” said Mortgage Bankers Association CEO David Stevens. “They’re barred from the building and barred from using the network for access. So, you have a real shutdown.”During the last government shutdown, in 2013, three in 10 homebuyers and sellers reported problems in the application process, most reporting a delay in closing. The National Association of Realtors (NAR) found that in 2013, 17 percent of closings were delayed during the shutdown. However, CNBC notes that the housing market is stronger now than it was in 2013, and application volume is greater. This could mean that more buyers may be affected this time.During a shutdown, access to the FHA would be severely limited. NAR’s 2013 survey found that the closed FHA and USDA were the top negative impacts on the mortgage process during the shutdown. A few sellers even reported that they completely lost their bids during the shutdown and three percent said they got a weaker offer.If Congress and the Trump administration do not reach a decision by Friday, just a day before President Trump’s 100th day in office, a shutdown may be imminent. Government institutions from the Smithsonian to the IRS would be impacted, as their employees are furloughed.“Shutdown is not a desired end,” Mick Mulvaney, President Trump’s Budget Director, said on “Fox News Sunday.” “It’s not a tool. It’s not something that we want to have.” Sign up for DS News Daily last_img read more

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Ryan Anderson: Always Care, Never Kill

first_imgThe Heritage Foundation 24 March 2015AbstractAllowing physician-assisted suicide would be a grave mistake for four reasons. First, it would endanger the weak and vulnerable. Second, it would corrupt the practice of medicine and the doctor–patient relationship. Third, it would compromise the family and intergenerational commitments. And fourth, it would betray human dignity and equality before the law. Instead of helping people to kill themselves, we should offer them appropriate medical care and human presence. We should respond to suffering with true compassion and solidarity. Doctors should help their patients to die a dignified death of natural causes, not assist in killing. Physicians are always to care, never to kill.The Hippocratic Oath proclaims: “I will keep [the sick] from harm and injustice. I will neither give a deadly drug to anybody who asked for it, nor will I make a suggestion to this effect.”[1] This is an essential precept for a flourishing civil society. No one, especially a doctor, should be permitted to kill intentionally, or assist in killing intentionally, an innocent neighbor.Human life need not be extended by every medical means possible, but a person should never be intentionally killed. Doctors may help their patients to die a dignified death from natural causes, but they should not kill their patients or help them to kill themselves. This is the reality that such euphemisms as “death with dignity” and “aid in dying” seek to conceal.In 2015, at least 18 state legislatures and the District of Columbia are considering whether to allow physician-assisted suicide (PAS).[2] Legalizing physician-assisted suicide, however, would be a grave mistake because it would:Endanger the weak and vulnerable,Corrupt the practice of medicine and the doctor–patient relationship,Compromise the family and intergenerational commitments, andBetray human dignity and equality before the law.First, PAS endangers the weak and marginalized in society. Where it has been allowed, safeguards purporting to minimize this risk have proved to be inadequate and have often been watered down or eliminated over time. People who deserve society’s assistance are instead offered accelerated death.Second, PAS changes the culture in which medicine is practiced. It corrupts the profession of medicine by permitting the tools of healing to be used as techniques for killing. By the same token, PAS threatens to fundamentally distort the doctor–patient relationship because it reduces patients’ trust of doctors and doctors’ undivided commitment to the life and health of their patients. Moreover, the option of PAS would provide perverse incentives for insurance providers and the public and private financing of health care. Physician-assisted suicide offers a cheap, quick fix in a world of increasingly scarce health care resources.Third, PAS would harm our entire culture, especially our family and intergenerational obligations. The temptation to view elderly or disabled family members as burdens will increase, as will the temptation for those family members to internalize this attitude and view themselves as burdens. Physician-assisted suicide undermines social solidarity and true compassion.Fourth, PAS’s most profound injustice is that it violates human dignity and denies equality before the law. Every human being has intrinsic dignity and immeasurable worth. For our legal system to be coherent and just, the law must respect this dignity in everyone. It does so by taking all reasonable steps to prevent the innocent, of any age or condition, from being devalued and killed. Classifying a subgroup of people as legally eligible to be killed violates our nation’s commitment to equality before the law—showing profound disrespect for and callousness to those who will be judged to have lives no longer “worth living,” not least the frail elderly, the demented, and the disabled. No natural right to PAS exists, and arguments for such a right are incoherent: A legal system that allows assisted suicide abandons the natural right to life of all its citizens.http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2015/03/always-care-never-kill-how-physician-assisted-suicide-endangers-the-weak-corrupts-medicine-compromises-the-family-and-violates-human-dignity-and-equalitylast_img read more

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