Master Chocolatier Turns Her Attention to Teaching Kids

first_img Subscribe 12 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. It is alluring…It satisfies something deep within us and has a melting point equal to our body temperature. In history, its delights have been reserved only for Royalty, yet today we have it at our fingertips to indulge in it’s silkiness and richness in everything from Cookies, Cakes and even a decadent Soufflé….yes of course it is Chocolate!This love and passion of/for Chocolate or as some Chocolatiers describe as being bitten by the Chocolate bug was something that came into the path of longtime Le Cordon Bleu Pasadena High School and College Demonstration Chef Arcelia Gallardo.While visiting High Schools and Colleges on behalf of Le Cordon Bleu from 2002-2008, Gallardo was looking for something quick, delicious, and had a rich Cultural History to not only give a delicious sample to kids, but some History as well.“Chocolate was an easy way to get the attention of rambunctious students and as I began to explore the amazing History of Chocolate I feel in love the Artisan Nature and Culture and early beginnings surrounding Chocolate,” commented Gallardo.Upon leaving Le Cordon Bleu, Gallardo set off to travel the World to soak up as much Chocolate knowledge as possible.First stop in 2009, where she attended World Champion and Renowned Pastry Chef Ewald Notter’s French Pastry School in Florida where she learned the tricks and knowledge that would enable her to become the Co-Owner of www.casadechocolates.com an Authentic Artisanal Chocolate store in Berkeley California.Her quest for knowledge has taken her throughout Europe and most importantly to the areas closely tied to the Origins and history of Chocolate, visiting and learning the Cacao Farming practices of farms in Belize and Tabassco Mexico.In recalling the most interesting fact of her journeys to the Cacao Farms Gallardo remorsefully stated, ”the people that grow the Cacao which later becomes Chocolate that we know, those Farmers do not even know what Chocolate taste like.”Fortunately, this summer, Teenagers and Children from greater Pasadena will be able to taste and learn from this Master Chocolatier at the Summer Art Academy’s Cooking Camp www.summerartacademy.com as Gallardo will be leading a delicious week called Chocolate Extravaganza June 24th – June 28th.“We will be making an amazing complete Chocolate Sculpture that I will be giving the kids all of the techniques I learned from Chef Notter and throughout my travels.”Chris Allen, former Pasadena College of Culinary Arts Le Cordon Bleu Chef Instructor and Owner/Executive Chef of the Cooking Camp commented, “We are extremely excited to have someone of Arcelia’s caliber, ability and passion of working with Chocolate returning to teach at our Cooking Camp this summer as she was a member of my staff in 2006 and 2007.”“This is going to be one of the best sessions we have ever had at Cooking Camp and I cannot wait to see the Masterpieces that are created,” added Chef Allen.By utilizing traditional Latin flavors like chilies, pumpkin seeds, Gallardo is trying to keep the link to the Mayans and Aztec cultures. Some of the amazing creations that Gallardo has available online are her specialties like Tequila Bon-Bon, Chipotle Caramel, Dark Chocolate Cake and their Top Seller the Dark Chocolate Quinoa.Who knows, after your child attends the Chocolate Extravaganza week at the Cooking Camp, they too may become bit by the Chocolate bug and become a World Champion Pastry Chef like Ewald Notter.A balanced diet is a Chocolate Bar in each hand. HerbeautyTop 9 Predicted Haircut Trends Of 2020HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyDoes Giving Ultimatums In A Relationship Ever Work Out?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyVictoria’s Secret Model’s Tips For Looking Ultra SexyHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Business News Make a comment Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy center_img Food & Wine Master Chocolatier Turns Her Attention to Teaching Kids By FIELDING MELISH Published on Saturday, May 18, 2013 | 12:46 pm faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News More Cool Stuff Your email address will not be published. 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Commentary: How Houses Become Homes

first_imgDecember 13, 2017By John KrullTheStatehouseFile.com INDIANAPOLIS – History matters.Place matters.People matter.John Krull, publisher, TheStatehouseFile.comThose are the lessons I glean from chatting with three couples who have built lives and raised families in historic Herron-Morton Place neighborhood. We’re talking as part of a documentary marking the 50thanniversary of the creation of the Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission.All three families – the Osilis, the Greens and the Ranasinghe-Rutts – have lived in their homes, sturdy, stately structures dating from the late 19th century, for more than 15 years. Their stories are tales of reclamation and redemption, of building their present lives on the foundations of the past.It wasn’t always easy.Dan Green and Kristi Allen-Green are police officers.When they first bought their home in 1998, Dan says, people looked at them funny because the neighborhood was part of “Dodge City,” a high-crime area. He and Kristi each had police cruisers to drive, which they parked in front of their house. That reassured the neighbors, he adds, but it didn’t solve every problem.“Even then, I caught people smoking crack in the alley,” he says. “Had a guy passed out in my front yard with no pants on. My daughter found him. Caught people, crackheads, stealing my neighbor’s’ stuff off of their porch. So, there was a lot of that stuff that goes. It doesn’t just happen magically.”Kristi says she loves how much the neighborhood has changed.Thirty years, while working undercover, she says she “bought dope” at a house just around the corner from where she and her family now live.“Now, it’s this palatial mansion,” she laughs.All three families say they have spent years, decades in total, working on their homes. They talk – a little ruefully, a lot lovingly – about the care and maintenance old houses require.Why did they do it?They like the connection with the past.Kishan Ranasinghe and Victoria Mara Rutt, both self-employed, had no intention of buying an old house when they looked at their current home during an estate sale. But the grand staircase spoke to them of a lost elegance. They were enchanted.Vop Osili, an Indianapolis-Marion County Council member and an architect, fell in love with his home twice. He spotted it first more than 20 years ago, when he and his father, who was battling cancer, took a drive through Herron-Morton. They parked at a corner just across from his current home and noted the beauty of the flagpole, the flag flapping in the breeze, the strong trees, the stolid grace of the house itself.When he and his wife, Una, a dean at Indiana University, were looking for a home seven years later, they found the house was on the market. He mentioned the earlier moment to her, they looked at the house and knew they’d found a place to raise their children.Kristi Allen-Green’s home once was owned by Virginia Keep, an illustrator for Hoosier poet James Whitcomb Riley. Kristi says she likes to think of Riley spending time in her home.But the real satisfactions, she says – and her neighbors echo this – come from the ways these old homes enhance lives.Kristi says that too often people are entranced “by the newest, greatest thing.” Sometimes, the old ways are the best.She says these houses have dining rooms that invite families and friends to sit down, break bread and spend time together. Victoria Mara Rutt says that, because the yards are close together and the garages are detached, neighbors see each other frequently and often linger to talk and catch up.Kristi says front porches are a crucial component of neighborliness.“Sitting on your front porch … that’s inviting people to come up and speak and talk to you,” she chuckles. “That’s how I met the Osilis. we were on the porch. Then we were all fast friends.”This neighborhood, like so many others, didn’t save itself.It came together because the people who live here worked and cared and because government encouraged them with tax credits and other forms of support.By working together, these neighbors created a place where history matters.Where place matters.Where people matter.FOOTNOTE: John Krull is director of Franklin College’s Pulliam School of Journalism, host of “No Limits” WFYI 90.1 Indianapolis and publisher of TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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7th KWASFEST: Athletes lament poor coordination, welfare, kits

first_imgRelatedPosts Saraki to Kwara Governor: Call those encroaching my land led by your SA to order FG hails Kwara Governor over social investment programme COVID-19 taught us to be closer to God – ex-NAN Director Some Athletes at the ongoing 7th Kwara State Sports Festival on Tuesday decried the poor coordination, welfare and quality of kits provided for the event. Some of the athletes told the News Agency of Nigeria in Ilorin that they were not happy as they were not getting what they expected at the event. The athletes said they were only persevering because of their love for the sports they were participating in. Benjamin Adeyemi, a Handball player from Isin Local Government Area, said the festival was organised like an amateur event. Adeyemi said: “The festival is so poor, the arrangement looks as if it is an amateur programme. “Whosoever is in charge of welfare didn’t do a good job because we are being treated as if we are secondary school students. “For breakfast, we are being given N30 bread with coloured water as tea and boiled eggs. “The kits are also nothing to write home about as we were given polo shirts as jerseys, which is also of very low quality and they are not even enough.” Toyin Adewumi from Ekiti Local Government Area said “the welfare is not encouraging at all”. ADewumi added: “We are just persevering because of our love for sports. “May be in the subsequent editions, they can improve, but for now, this is not good at all.” Adijat Mohammed, who plays volleyball for Oyun Local Government Area, claimed the last meal they were served was lunch on Monday. Mohammed said: “We were given rice yesterday afternoon which also served as our dinner. “We had to use our money to eat dinner and this morning we were not given breakfast. “We resorted to drink Garri before our match starts.” Another athlete from Oyun Local Government Area, Seliat Mohammed, also said it was unfortunate that the festival was revived for athletes to suffer. Reacting to the complaints, the State Director of Sports, Tunde Kazeem, said the various local government councils were responsible for provision of kits, feeding and allowances and not the state. Kazeem explained that the Main Organising Committee was only responsible for accommodation, security and other logistics of the host community. He assured that the N500 daily allowances for athletes would be paid on the last day of the programme. NAN reports that the 7th edition of the festival, which opened on January 25, is expected to end on Saturday. Athletes from 16 local government areas of the state are featuring in 26 events. NAN.Tags: Benjamin AdeyemiIsin LGAKWAFESTKwara Statelast_img read more

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Lakers to hold Julius Randle out in second game of Summer League

first_imgOnly 48 hours await before Julius Randle will make his summer league debut, ending a 10-month rehab process on a right leg injury that wiped out his rookie season.Even before seeing how that plays out, the Lakers are exercising caution. They will sit Randle out of the Lakers’ second summer league game Saturday against Philadelphia in Las Vegas after he plays in the opener Friday against Minnesota.The Lakers stressed Randle has not experienced any setbacks on his surgically repaired right leg and foot since participating in organized full-court practices this week. Instead, the Lakers determined sitting him on the second game of a back-to-back would help Randle phase back onto the floor. Randle then plans to play against New York on Monday.The Lakers shared their plan with Randle after he spoke with reporters Wednesday at the team’s practice facility in El Segundo. But Randle offered no indication of any setbacks and often flashed a smile. “Amazing,” Randle said in describing his state of physical and mental being. “It’s a blessing to be back on the court. I’m doing what I love so I can’t complain. A lot of fun getting up and down. I’m just playing the game, so I can’t complain.”Well, perhaps Randle can complain about one thing.Randle seemed somewhat sheepish over the several nicknames his teammates have given him to describe his dominant play in practice. Lakers rookie guard D’Angelo Russell called Randle “a beast.” Lakers guard Jordan Clarkson described Randle as “a monster.” Lakers rookie center Robert Upshaw likened Randle to an “ox.”“Can’t I get a pretty name?” Randle asked, jokingly.Lakers forward Tarik Black compared Randle to a “lotus flower.” In Buddhism, that symbolizes “the rising and blooming above the murk to achieve enlightenment.” Randle called Black “goofy” when he heard the nickname, before saying, “I’ll roll with one.” But he did not sound keen on joining the nickname game. “I don’t give out my nicknames. I’ll let ya’ll do it for me,” Randle said. “I just go with the flow and just hoop.”That has not happened in a while.Randle, whom the Lakers selected seventh overall in the 2014 NBA Draft, played only 14 minutes in the Lakers’ season opener last October before fracturing a tibia in his right leg, a season-ending injury that required surgery.“Just me being back on the court is an A-plus for me,” Randle said. “I’ve been missing this the whole year.”Free-agency updateFormer Lakers guard Jeremy Lin agreed to a deal with the Charlotte Hornets. Both the Lakers and Lin felt lukewarm about a reunion after he experienced an adjustment with Byron Scott’s Princeton-based offense, sharing ball-handling duties with Kobe Bryant and fluctuating between a starting and bench role. Attendance updateLakers guard Dwight Buycks practiced Wednesday after the team excused him the past two sessions so he could attend a funeral.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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