Yesteryear: Division and Main Streets

first_img Division and Main Streets by Pat SidesIn this 1982 photo, the old railroad tracks that once stretched down the center of Division Street are still intact. The intersection of Division and Main streets was one of the busiest in the city; regarded as the “gateway to the north,” the historic Jacobsville neighborhood begins in this block north of Division Street, terminating at Bosse Field.As plans for a new east-west expressway progressed, familiar landmarks began to disappear along Division. The prominent two-story brick structure sitting at an angle in the center of the photo had stood since the 1890s. Originally built by North Side businessman Newton Kelsay, the firm manufactured harness parts for horse-drawn buggies and other products until it was sold in 1957. Along with all the other commercial buildings pictured here, it fell victim to the wrecking ball in the late 1980s. A fast food restaurant now occupies the site where most of these buildings stood.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Honduran Army Supports National Vaccination Campaign

first_imgBy Dialogo May 17, 2012 Since the end of April, Honduran Military personnel have been participating in a National Vaccination Campaign, in support of the Honduran Public Health Ministry. The objective of this campaign is to motivate citizens to get vaccinated in order to prevent diseases such as measles and rubella, among others. The national vaccination campaign will extend until May 18 and will rely on the assistance of Honduran Military personnel, who already have experience with similar missions, as in the case of medical missions. Recently, for example, the 105th Infantry Brigade traveled to the municipality of La Másica, where around 6,000 inhabitants received general medical, dental, pediatric, psychological, orthopedic, and gynecological services, as well as free medicine. So far this year, the Honduran Armed Forces have carried out nine medical missions in different parts of the national territory, benefiting almost 25,000 Hondurans.last_img read more

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Valley Stream Heroin Dealer Who Caused Fatal ODs Gets 9 Years

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Valley Stream heroin dealer was sentenced Wednesday to nine years in prison for selling a version of the drug that was linked to two fatal overdoses and several other non-fatal ODs.Bryan Jennings had pleaded guilty last month in Nassau County court to criminal sale of a controlled substance and criminal possession of a controlled substance.“This defendant poisoned our communities by selling heroin and narcotics, preying on addicts to benefit himself,” Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas said.Prosecutors said the 35-year-old man sold heroin laced with the powerful painkiller fentanyl between September 2015 and last August.Vice Squad detectives found more than 30 grams of heroin laced with fentanyl and 20 grams of cocaine, also laced with fentanyl, along with scales, packaging material and about $1,000 in small bills when they executive a search warrant at his home, authorities said.Judge Alan Honorof also sentenced Jennings to three years of post-release supervision.last_img read more

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7 ways to get more (and better) creative ideas from your credit union team

first_imgCredit unions are a unique business. However, there are certain things that all businesses share. One of these is the need for innovation. Because the credit union business is constantly changing (now there’s an understatement!), it’s vital that credit unions keep innovating to stay ahead of the curve. And all innovation begins with a single, creative idea. But how do you get those creative ideas? Here are 7 ways that you, as a credit union leader, can get more (and better) creative ideas from your credit union team. Get them out of the workplace.A change of location helps shake the brain out of its routine. It also gets people away from the multiple distractions of the workplace, which are not conducive to creativity. So try having a lunch meeting at a local restaurant. Maybe a nearby hotel has a nice lobby area for a small, informal meeting. If it’s nice outside, go to a park! Anyplace other than your credit union’s version of “Meeting Room C.” Give them the “What”; let them give you the “How.”Nothing kills the creative spirit more than being micromanaged. Creative people (and we are all creative people) love being challenged. As a leader, it’s your job to set the goal (the “What”). Now, ask your team to come up with the “How.” Tip: prepare to be surprised by some brilliant ideas that you would never have thought of! Ask crazy questions.When looking for creative solutions to your next credit union challenge, ask your team “crazy” questions. Questions like: “How would we solve this problem if we had $20 million to throw at it?” “How would a professional dancer solve this problem?” “How would three cats, working together, solve this problem?” Not only will this force your team members’ brains into their naturally creative space, you may just find the germ of an actual solution in some of the answers they come up with! Make a “play space.”Creativity needs stimulation to thrive. People are more creative when they play. If possible, furnish one of your meeting rooms with a few toys (Nerf® balls, Legos®, etc.) and interesting, colorful magazines (not credit union—or any industry-related—magazines!). And, if you’re really serious about this, paint this room a shade of green. Studies show that the color green boosts creativity! Invite an outsider.Every now and then, invite someone from outside the credit union (and, preferably, from outside the financial services industry) to sit in on a meeting. An artist, a comedian, an art historian. Someone who sees the world through a completely different lens than you or your team. This person might see solutions, or come up with ideas, that would never occur to someone from the credit union industry. Send your team out for a walk.According to recent research done at Stanford, people do their best creative thinking while in motion—outdoors, down a corridor, or even just a treadmill. Many leaders have discovered the multiple benefits (including, of course, health) of holding “walking” meetings. Initiate “Plagiarism Friday.”(Full disclosure: I plagiarized this idea from someone else, but I can’t remember whom.) Every Friday, have each member of your team bring in one great idea from outside the credit union industry and share what makes the idea creative and innovative. Then ask your team how that idea could be incorporated into the credit union. (a bonus tip!) Let your team know that ideas are welcome, encouraged, even required, from everyone.No one has a monopoly on great ideas! That next breakthrough idea—the one that takes your credit union to the next level—can come from anyone on the team.Creativity and innovation are the keys to your credit union’s success. Every new challenge (and it seems like there’s a new one every day) requires a creative solution. It’s up to you, as a credit union leader, to encourage, support, and value creativity from everyone on your team! 51SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Bill Stainton Bill Stainton works with extraordinary leaders who want to produce breakthrough results with their teams. A 29-time Emmy® Award-winning producer, writer, and performer, Bill speaks frequently to Credit Unions and … Web: www.billstainton.com Detailslast_img read more

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‘Review technology helps umpires sleep better at night’ -Bucknor

first_img….confident technology has improved umpiringICONIC West Indies umpire Steve Bucknor believes the game’s recent embrace of technology must make it easier for umpires to sleep well at night, as bad decisions can be corrected quickly.Bucknor, whose career behind the stumps lasted for 20-years, officiated in 128 Test matches and 181 One Day Internationals.  In addition, he stood in 5 World Cups.With the Jamaica-born official having retired in 2009 and the Umpire Digital Review System (DRS) being trialed in 2008, he never had the advantage of appeals and instant replays but is certain it has made the game better for all involved.“I am not certain if it affects the confidence of umpires, but I know it has improved umpiring,” Bucknor told the Mason and Guest radio programme..“It has improved umpiring because there was a time when we were saying the batsman was so-called playing down the line, therefore he is not going to be given out leg before, but if the technology is saying the ball is hitting, then you have to give him out.  So, we learn from the technology,” he added.“The umpires who do not enjoy having technology around, I hope that they have a rethink.  What it does if you make a mistake it can be corrected on the field,” Bucknor said.  “Now thinking about when I was umpiring and I gave a batsman out who was not out, realizing I made a mistake it took a long time to fall asleep that night.  Now you can fall asleep quickly because the correct decision is eventually given.”Bucknor infamously and incorrectly gave legendary India batsman Sachin Tendulkar out on two occasions.   The first of the mistakes came in Australia (at the Gabba in Brisbane off Jason Gillespie in 2003) where he declared Tendulkar lbw, when the ball was clearly flying over the stumps.Another decision was a caught behind (at the Eden in Kolkata off Abdul Razzaq in 2005) when he thought the batsman had nicked the ball.“It is human to err.  These were mistakes.  I don’t think any umpire wants to do the wrong thing, it lives with him and his future could be jeopardised.  I was unhappy but human beings make mistakes.  Accepting your mistakes and moving on is a part of life.”(Sportsmax)last_img read more

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