Navdeep Saini, Khaleel Ahmed among 4 pacers to assist India in World Cup 2019 preparation

first_imgNavdeep Saini, Khaleel Ahmed among 4 pacers to assist India in World Cup 2019 preparationWorld Cup 2019: 4 high-quality pacers, not part of the India squad, will help the team prepare for the 2019 Cricket World Cup in England.advertisement India Today Web Desk New DelhiApril 16, 2019UPDATED: April 16, 2019 00:24 IST Navdeep Saini and Khaleel were discussed when the selectors met to pick the Indian team for the World Cup. (IANS Photo)HIGHLIGHTSSaini, Khaeel, Avesh and Chahar will help India prepapre for the 2019 Cricket World CupIndia have named only 3 specialist pacers in the squad for the World CupSaini and Khaleel were discussed when the selectors met to pick the Indian team for the World CupPacers Navdeep Saini, Avesh Khan, Khaleel Ahmed and Deepak Chahar will assist the Indian team in their World Cup 2019 preparation. Saini and Khaeel’s names were discussed by the selectors who named a 15-man India squad for the World Cup in England.India named 3 pacers – Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Jasprit Bumrah and Mohammed Shami – in the squad alogside 3 spinners – Yuzvendra Chahal, Ravindra Jadeja and Kuldeep Yadav. Rishbah Pant’s omission raised a few eyebrows but chief selector MSK Prasad said Dinesh Karthik was picked because of his better wicketkeeping skills.There were no real surpises in the Indian team for the World Cup which will be led by Virat Kohli with Rohit Sharma as his captain. As many as 7 players will play a World Cup for the first time in this Indian squad.MSK Prasad, spoke to the media on Monday and said his committee has chosen a well-balanced squad for the World Cup and belived all bases have been covered.”In the team, we have the luxury of 7 bowlers. We have covered all the bases and this is one of the most balanced Indian sides for the World Cup,” Prasad said. “Khaleel and Saini were discussed and they will be around. If the need arises, one of them will go to England,” he said.Navdeep Saini, Khaleel Ahmed and Deepak Chahar are all currently involved in the IPL. While Saini plays for Royal Challengers Bangalore, Khaeel plays for Sunrisers Hyderabad. Deepak Chahar has had an impressive 2019 IPL season for defending champions Chennai Super Kings.advertisementIndian team for the World Cup: Virat Kohli (Captain), Rohit Sharma (vice-captain), Shikhar Dhawan, KL Rahul, Vijay Shankar, MS Dhoni (wicket-keeper), Kedar Jadhav, Dinesh Karthik, Yuzvendra Chahal, Kuldeep Yadav, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Jasprit Bumrah, Hardik Pandya, Ravindra Jadeja, Mohammed ShamiIndia’s World Cup schedule:vs South Africa (June 5)vs Australia (June 9)vs New Zealand (June 13)vs Pakistan (June 16)vs Afghanistan (June 22)vs West Indies (June 27)vs England (June 30)vs Bangladesh (July 2)vs Sri Lanka (July 6)Also Read | India strong contender for World Cup: VVS LaxmanAlso Read | A bit surprised: Sunil Gavaskar on Rishabh Pant omission from World Cup squadFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bykarishma Tags :Follow ICC Cricket World Cup 2019Follow India world cup squadFollow MSK PrasadFollow Navdeep SainiFollow Khaleel Ahmedlast_img read more

Read More »

Environment minister approves use of giant turbines in Bay of Fundy

HALIFAX – Nova Scotia’s environment minister has cleared the way for the installation of two giant turbines in the Bay of Fundy for tidal power research, weeks after halting the project to gather more information about its environmental impact.Margaret Miller announced her approval Monday of the monitoring plan drawn up by the Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy (FORCE) and Cape Sharp Tidal Venture.After consulting with concerned fishermen and her counterparts at the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Miller said she is satisfied enough with the plan to test the waters of tidal power technology.“This is a demonstration project,” she told reporters on Monday. “There is no place like the Bay of Fundy, so putting these turbines in the water at this point we will be collecting data from now on.”Cape Sharp’s five-storey-high turbines, destined for the Minas Passage, are expected to generate enough electricity to power 1,000 homes. The company, a partnership of OpenHydro and Emera, is one of several who plan to test different turbine technology in the Bay of Fundy.The plan to install the mammoth turbines in the passage has faced strong opposition from the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen’s Association, which contends that instream tidal turbines can’t be made safe for the ecosystem.Miller said her department has been consulting with the fishermen as part of an ongoing data-gathering process since 2009 and their concerns have been “heard.”No one from the association could be reached for comment.Miller said the project’s environmental effects program will improve the understanding of the interaction between the turbines and marine life.An environmental assessment officer for the department said similar projects in Europe have proven to be “low risk,” but granted that Fundy’s unparalleled tides could present unique challenges.“Until devices are in the water and we have the opportunity to learn what these effects are … that’s largely unknown at this point in time,” Steve Sandford said.Despite the gaps in knowledge, Sandford does not anticipate the 1,000-tonne turbines will have a “food processor effect” on marine wildlife, assuring that the blades spin below sushi-making speeds.If it is determined there is a negative effect on the ecosystem, he said the response could be anything from improving mitigation plans to removal of the devices, depending on the extent of the problem.Sandford said the information collected from the turbine trial run will inform decisions about possible commercial expansions.In a statement, the province said FORCE must develop programs aimed at enhancing marine mammal monitoring and provide more details on contingency planning in the event of equipment failure before it gives the go ahead for more turbines to be deployed. by Adina Bresge, The Canadian Press Posted Jun 20, 2016 8:40 am MDT Last Updated Jun 20, 2016 at 3:20 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Environment minister approves use of giant turbines in Bay of Fundy A turbine for the Cape Sharp Tidal project is seen at the Pictou Shipyard in Pictou, N.S., on May 19, 2016. Nova Scotia’s environment minister has cleared the way for the installation of two giant turbines in the Bay of Fundy for tidal power research. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan read more

Read More »

Facing another tough winter Brock scientists help grape growers prepare for fight

Jim Willerth collects samples of grape vines for CCOVI’s VineAlert program. Amid new predictions for another deep-freeze winter, scientists at Brock University are taking steps to help Ontario grape growers avoid millions of dollars worth of cold-weather damage.Brock’s Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute (CCOVI) has reinstituted VineAlert, a program that measures the cold hardiness of grapevines and warns growers when to turn on their frost-fighting wind machines. As another tool, CCOVI is also partnering with Ontario Grape and Wine Research Inc. (OGWRI) to produce a best-practices manual to help growers avoid devastating injury to grapevines.This comes as a new economic impact study says VineAlert helps Ontario’s grape industry avoid up to $13.8 million in lost sales from a single severe cold weather event, as well as $11.7 million in lost sales while damaged vines recover in subsequent years, and $29.1 million in vine renewal and replacement costs.The study by the Goodman School of Business consulting group also found that, last winter alone, VineAlert helped growers save as much as $2.3 million in fuel costs just by knowing when it was not necessary to turn on their wind machines.Ontario’s $3.3-billion grape and wine sector represents half of the Canadian industry, and CCOVI director Debbie Inglis says preventing winter injury is a constant concern.“It only takes one cold event where vines are not protected, and you can have serious crop loss and ongoing costs associated with that loss,” she said. “Our cold hardiness program gives growers the knowledge to make informed decisions, which results in savings of time and money.”Niagara-on-the-Lake grape grower Trevor Falk says VineAlert helps local growers by providing distinct information for different micro-climates within a single Ontario region.“To have research done on representative vineyards is invaluable when making business decisions in the vineyard regarding wind machine use,” said Falk.VineAlert tracks a grape bud’s ability to survive severe cold during the dormant season from October to April, signalling at what temperature different varieties would sustain damage.“The key is to know when to turn on a wind machine, to warm up the local air so the vine never experiences the cold temperatures,” said Inglis. “You cannot tell that just by looking at the vine. We actually go out and sample buds from grapevines, bring them back and use our freezer systems to measure how cold tolerant they are before they die.”Besides considering the vine variety and vineyard location, VineAlert researchers also factor in the conditions and lateness of the preceding growing season, and how deep into the winter a cold snap is occurring.“If a vine’s cold hardiness in autumn has been delayed due to a late start in the spring growing season, or a cool growing season like we had this year, then a minus-15 spell in late November has more impact than a minus-15 event two months later.”Beyond economic savings, there are social and environmental gains from knowing when wind machines are required. Benefits include noise reduction in areas where vineyards border urban developments, and reduced running time for wind machine engines.CCOVI scientist Jim Willwerth, supported by colleagues Kevin Ker and Inglis, developed the new best-practices manual, which is based on five years of cold-hardiness research.VineAlert is currently supported through funding from the Grape Growers of Ontario and the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation’s (MRI) Ontario Research Fund’s Research Excellence program. Funding from MRI and OGWRI supported the development of the best practices guide and the VineAlert database. read more

Read More »