Sheryl Sandberg picks Option B in her book on resilience

by Barbara Ortutay, The Associated Press Posted Apr 24, 2017 8:08 am MDT Last Updated Apr 24, 2017 at 9:20 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Sheryl Sandberg picks ‘Option B’ in her book on resilience NEW YORK, N.Y. – Though perhaps best known as Facebook’s No. 2 executive, Sheryl Sandberg is also a mentor, a mother, a billionaire and an author. When her husband Dave Goldberg died suddenly in 2015 while they were vacationing in Mexico, she added “widow” to the list.“The grief felt like a void, like it was sucking me in and pushing on me, pulling me in and I couldn’t even see or breathe,” she said in an interview with The Associated Press. “People who have been through things like this told me it gets better. And I really didn’t believe them…. I want other people going through things to believe it does get better.”Her new book — “Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy,” written with psychologist Adam Grant — chronicles the devastating loss, her grief and how she emerged from it with a new perspective on life. A humbled follow-up to her first book, “Lean In ,” it’s also a how-to, drawing from studies and the experiences of others to describe techniques for building strength and resilience and ways to support those going through hard times.Sandberg also uses the new book to address what she now sees as shortcomings in the career advice she offered women in “Lean In.” Surveying the world as a wealthy corporate executive rendered her oblivious to the circumstances faced by less fortunate women, she acknowledged. Not everyone can lean in; not everyone wants to.“I didn’t get it,” she wrote. “I didn’t get how hard it is to succeed at work when you are overwhelmed at home.”THE FIRST MONTHSThe most affecting parts of the book recount not just Sandberg’s grief, but that of her children. When she had to tell them that their father died. When, arriving at the cemetery for his funeral, they “got out of the car and fell to the ground, unable to take another step. I lay on the grass, holding them as they wailed,” unable to protect them from their sorrow.It did get better, though slowly. Sandberg returned to work at Facebook in a haze, unable to summon her previous self-confidence.“I couldn’t understand when friends didn’t ask me how I was. I felt invisible, as if I was standing in front of them but they couldn’t see me,” she writes, adding later, that by staying silent in such situations “we often isolate friends, family and co-workers.”At Facebook, Sandberg has long been an advocate of “bringing your whole self to work,” meaning a willingness to share your personal life with co-workers. But this can get tricky when it comes to facing trauma. Sandberg found it difficult, and even considered carrying around a stuffed pachyderm to encourage co-workers and even friends to talk about the “elephant in the room.”PICKING UP THE PIECESThen one day, about a month after Goldberg died, she decided to post on Facebook about her grief, her gratitude toward her friends, and her related tumultuous feelings — for instance, coming to believe she would never again feel real joy. She wrote it out, not planning to share it publicly. After some more thought, she decided it couldn’t possibly make things worse.The change was immediate. Friends, co-workers and strangers — many of whom had dealt with loss themselves — began reaching out. It helped, Sandberg wrote. The post has been shared more than 400,000 times and has some 74,000 comments. It opened up a conversation.“I know it almost sounds silly because I certainly work at Facebook and I know what Facebook’s mission is,” she said. “But experiencing it for myself was a very … deep experience.”Talking about these things, as difficult as it might be, can be a lifeline. As is getting help at work, something Sandberg acknowledged not everyone can. Facebook has recently extended its bereavement policies to allow employees more time off after the death of a loved one. But Sandberg says supporting people once they are back at work — including reminding them that their contributions are needed and welcome — is just as important.“Death is not the only kind of adversity that summons up the elephant,” Sandberg wrote in the book. “Anything that reminds us of the possibility of loss can leave us at a loss for words. Financial difficulties. Divorce. Unemployment. Rape. Addiction. Incarceration. Illness.”BUILDING STRENGTHA few weeks after she lost her husband, Sandberg was talking with a friend, making plans for someone to fill in for a father-child activity. Crying, she told the friend “But I want Dave.” He put his arm around her and said, “Option A is not available. So let’s just kick the s— out of Option B.”Sandberg said she believes strongly in pre-traumatic growth — people’s ability to build up resilience before something bad happens so that they are able to deal with it better. She has peppered the book with anecdotes and studies about resilience, from the story of Malala Yousafzai, the 19-year-old Pakistani activist and Nobel Peace laureate, to that of the survivors of a 1972 plane crash in the Andes described in the book (and movie) “Alive.”“Tragedy does not have to be personal, pervasive or permanent, but resilience can be,” she writes. “We can build it and carry it with us throughout our lives.” read more

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Kawasaki enhances range piston pumps for hydraulic excavators

first_imgKawasaki Precision Machinery says it is helping manufacturers improve efficiency and cost savings, with the launch of a new range of pumps, motors and control valves. “The new products build on the company’s 20 plus years’ experience in hydraulic systems for excavators and signify its move to a total systems supplier for all types of construction machinery, such as telehandlers, backhoe loaders and wheel loaders.”The range includes the K3VLS Axial Piston Pump, developed for machines and equipment that use load-sensing or electronic control systems. John Boote, Business Development Manager at Kawasaki Precision Machinery, explained: “At the heart of the new range is the K3VLS which is available in sizes 65, 85 and 105 cc with 50, 125 and 150 cc being officially launched at the show. The pump is significantly lighter than previous models in our range and our rigorous in-house testing process shows that it maintains best in class efficiency across the operating range. This greatly impacts the fuel consumption of the machine, resulting in significant cost savings for the end user.”The K3VLS features electronic displacement control, torque limiting control and variable horsepower control. It has a 280 bar maximum operating pressure, 350 bar peak pressure rating and is proven to lower fuel consumption even when idling. The other new products in the range include the M7V High Speed Axial Piston Motor, one of the quietest on the market, thanks to its newly developed rotating group, the K8V Series Closed Loop Axial Piston pump (available in 71, 90 and 125 cc) and the KLSV Load Sensing Control Valve, a series of flow-sharing, load-sensing main control valves.All products have benefited from the expertise of the Kawasaki technology centre where Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), is used to maximise component efficiency. Boote continued: “We have over 450 engineers in the Kawasaki Development Centre, 110 of whom specialise in hydraulics. Together, they’ve developed everything from the world’s fastest production motorbike, the Ninja H2R, to jet engines and gas turbines. This knowledge and research and development has now been applied to develop a range of products for construction machinery that offer significant efficiency and fuel savings when used as individual components, but even more when combined as a total solution. Our new total solutions approach builds on our success in the excavator component market and gives clients efficiency and reliability built in, one point of contact from a supplier perspective, and ultimately saves valuable time and resource.”last_img read more

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