Mayors electric vehicle charging network Source London to go live in spring

Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, has announced that London’s city wide electric vehicle charging network, ‘Source London’, will launch in spring 2011. Source London, which will deliver 1,300 public charging points across London by 2013, is part of the Mayor’s plans for London to become the electric vehicle capital of Europe. The network will create a single visual identity for electric driving across the capital, and allow members to charge their vehicles at any one of these public charging points for no more than an £100 annual membership fee. Currently, electric vehicle drivers have to register in each separate borough they want to use charge points in. In preparation for this new network, a website, www.sourcelondon.net, has also been launched providing a ‘one stop shop’ of information on electric vehicles, including charge point locations across the city.The scheme has been led by Transport for London in close collaboration with the London boroughs and a wide range of private sector partners, who will play a key part in funding and providing locations for the network’s charge points. “Already there are more electric drivers in London than anywhere else in the UK, but we are now entering an incredibly exciting period in electric motoring”, said Mr Johnson, “Major manufacturers are gearing up to launch more affordable, practical electric cars over the next few years, whilst the cost of traditional fuels are making petrol-free driving an increasingly attractive option. By opting for electric in greater numbers, Londoners will also help to cut pollution levels and improve the city’s quality of living”. Transport Secretary, Philip Hammond, said: “We recognise that for many people the car is an essential, not a luxury, and that is why we are prioritising spending on making the UK a world leader in ultra low emission cars. Following the first round of our Plugged-in-Places scheme, cities like London are laying the groundwork for a national charge point network. And thanks to our spending review settlement, which secured over £400m for measures to promote the uptake of electric and ultra-low emission vehicle technologies, more areas will soon be able to join them.”Mr Johnson recently confirmed a 100% discount from the congestion charge for electric drivers in the capital, as well as other low emission vehicles, which offers electric vehicle owners using the zone a potential saving of more than £2000 a year.The aspiration is to have 100,000 electric vehicles on London’s streets as soon as possible. A recent report by HSBC estimates that the global electric vehicle market could be worth £440bn by 2020 with the EU being the biggest market. Work to boost this market in London could help to generate millions of pounds for the UK manufacturing industry, create new jobs and green the UK economy.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more

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Parents warned about Momo suicide game on YouTube

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Schools are warning parents to keep an eye on what their children are watching on YouTube after an online suicide game reportedly appeared in seemingly innocent videos like Peppa Pig.Teachers used social media to draw attention to the “highly inappropriate” clips showing the creepy character Momo.Originally created by a Japanese special effects company, the character has bulging eyes, a distorted wide mouth and the body of a bird.It encourages youngsters to hand over their mobile number and correspond with Momo, who sets them “challenges” involving self-harm and eventually suicide.Schools have published warnings on social media telling parents about the sinister game and urging them to monitor their children’s internet activity.Momo was reported to have infiltrated the popular video-sharing platform YouTube, appearing in programmes such as children’s cartoon Peppa Pig and clips of the video game Fortnite.The disturbing challenges have been linked to the death of a 12-year-old girl in Argentina. Other worrying stories include a five-year-old girl who hacked off her own hair after being ordered to do so by the sick character. Children who are feeling worried about their activity on apps or online games can contact Childline 24 hours a day, online and over the phone, on 0800 11 11 or by visiting www.childline.org.uk.  Haslingden Primary School in Rossendale, near Blackburn, was among the institutions which put out warnings about Momo.The school wrote on its Facebook page: “We have become increasingly aware of highly inappropriate videos circulating online and are being viewed by children across the school. “These video clips are appearing on many social media sites and YouTube (including Kids YouTube).”One of the videos starts innocently, like the start of a Peppa Pig episode for example, but quickly turn into an altered version with violence and offensive language.”Another video clip is going by the name of ‘MoMo’ which shows a warped white mask which is promoting children to do dangerous tasks without telling their parents.”Examples we have noticed in school include asking the children to turn the gas on or to find and take tablets.”National Online Safety said they had been contacted by hundreds of concerned schools and parents about Momo.The organisation told The Telegraph that their warning about the suicide game – “What parents need to know about Momo”- had been seen by more than two million people.YouTube said it had not received any evidence of the challenge on its site. A YouTube spokeswoman said: “Contrary to press reports, we have not received any evidence of videos showing or promoting the Momo challenge on YouTube.”Content of this kind would be in violation of our policies and removed immediately.”If adults are concerned or have any questions on how to approach the subject with their children you can contact the NSPCC Helpline on 0808 800 5000 or visit the NSPCC website. read more

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