A Brief But Passionate Affair with the Ferrari 488 Spider

first_imgI’m still not a car guy. I’ll never know how to take apart a motor or even identify most of the things under a vehicle’s hood. (I can refill a wiper fluid reservoir in seconds flat, though. And hell yeah can I jump a car and change a tire. But so can anyone who can read a manual.) But now I am a guy who can respect a great car. Yes, it’s crazy to think about spending more than a quarter of a million dollars on an automobile — it’s impractical and unnecessary and extravagant — but it’s not insane, if you’ll accept the difference. And if you disagree, well… you have clearly never driven a Ferrari 488 Spider with the top down and the road ahead clear for as far as the eye can see.(And for the record, if anyone from Lamborghini, Maserati, and so forth is out there, I’d be grudgingly willing to do some comparison test driving…) The Maserati Quattroporte: Luxury You Can Sort of Almost Imagine Affording NASCAR Driver Brad Keselowski on Crashing, Winning, and Creating a Legacy On the Road with Mikah Meyer, the First Person to Visit Every National Park Site in One Trip What It’s Like to Drive a NASCAR Race Car (and Where You Can Get Behind the Wheel) Editors’ Recommendations Before becoming a father, I always thought I could imagine how parenthood would feel. In fact, I took umbrage when people with children said things like: “Until you have kids, you just don’t get it.” Then my wife and I had our first child and, as it turned out, those people were right. I didn’t get it.The Ferrari 488 Spider is a pleasure in terms of actual driving, but it’s also a lot of fun thanks to the design and layout of the cabin.I’m not a car guy. I’ve never understood how some people can spend hours talking about this make of engine or that year’s body changes or… well, whatever the hell car guys talk about. I’m almost entirely in the dark when it comes to that whole arena. And beyond a lack of interest in knowing all about all things car-related on a technical or cultural level, I’ve never really had much desire even to drive fancy, powerful, or otherwise unique automobiles. I just didn’t get the allure.That, of course, was before I had the opportunity to spend four days with an electric blue Ferrari 488 Spider as my own personal vehicle, courtesy of the good folks at Ferrari and their partners Brandware PR.This car was dropped off at the curb in front of my house so I could drive it up to Lime Rock, Connecticut to cover a major auto racing event. And at another time, I’ll tell you all about that experience. But for now, let me tell you this: having driven this gorgeous, potent, responsive vehicle for just fewer than 500 miles (the mileage limit imposed for the loan, or else I would likely have driven it twice that distance), I am now essentially spoiled for life.At about 8:30 on a Friday morning in mid July, I eased myself into the long, low cockpit of a Ferrari 488 Spider. For the next few seconds, I remained bemused with the idea that such a disinterested sort when it came to anything automotive should be gripping the wheel of such a car. Then I depressed the red starter button set into the left side of the steering wheel and the engine came to life, sucking in oxygen and fuel with a throaty roar. Over the next few days, there awoke within me a sensation I had never known lay dormant: As it turns out, I love a fine automobile as much as the next fellow.Let me tell you a few things about the 2016 Ferrari 488 Spider it was my great privilege to drive. The car seats two, a driver and a passenger, it weighs around 3,350 pounds, give or take, it costs an average of around $300,000 (MSRP is just $272,700, but the extras, right?), and it has 660 horsepower. The Ferrari 488 goes from a stop to 60 MPH in three seconds and will be well past 80 and up to 100 in a breath more than that. It’s steering responds more quickly than a fly dodging a swat and the car leaves you feeling fully in control even as you verge on speeds over 125 miles per hour. Um… some other kids told me, is how I know that part. My first impression of the 488 Spider would be confirmed over and over again: it is very easy to drive this car and to feel very much safely in control as you do. I was worried that the vehicle would lurch away on me at a tap of the accelerator, but it’s quite the opposite: you have to squarely apply the gas for the car to get going, but you get what you give. Press that pedal down, and the car will go roaring along, turning the passing foliage (and other cars) into colorful blurs. Ease the gas pedal in and hold it there, and you can drive along at 60, 40, or 20 miles per hour with ease; the car doesn’t try to run away with you, but instead listens to everything you say, as it were. It turns as though pinned to the road with magnets and stops sharp when you need it to.I took most of the drive from New York City at mostly modest speeds up to an area where the western corners of Massachusetts and Connecticut meet. I was getting to know the car, and only opened things up for a few seconds here and there. This was partially out of respect for a car with which I was not yet well acquainted, and partly because I really didn’t want to get a ticket. Up among the forests, fields, and lonely roads of western New England, though, one finds it’s rather easy to drive a long stretch of road and find few officers of the law along the way. Thus my firsthand knowledge of higher speeds and higher turns; I’ll leave some of the details out.The Ferrari 488 Spider is a pleasure in turns of actual driving, but it’s also a lot of fun thanks to the design and layout of the cabin (AKA cockpit in a car like this). Most controls are on or adjacent to the steering wheel, like paddle shifts that send you up or down through seven gears. There are a few other knobs and buttons on the dash and center console, but for the most part you spend your time in this vehicle with your hands on the wheel and a (probably kind of dumb, but whatever) grin on your face. At first all the turned heads and shout-outs were a mix of amusing and a bit unnerving; by day two, I was smiling and waving and had stopped calling back things like: “Oh, it’s just a loaner for the weekend!”In other words, within a day I was a complete convert. And within another day, my son was a Ferrari lover too. In fact, he has already decided he’s going to get one when he’s older. And as he’s only three and a half, maybe if he starts saving now, he will. I know I’ll be glad to ride around in it with him, as he did (on a few quiet roads close to home) with me. That’s right, the Ferrari 488 Spider has the LATCH system to secure car seats. Damned thoughtful of them! A Breakdown of All the Major Types of Car Racinglast_img read more

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Security Council extends UN political mission in GuineaBissau

The United Nations Security Council today extended the mandate of the United Nations political mission in Guinea-Bissau to assist in finding solutions to the political and economic crisis being exacerbated by additional challenges posed by transnational crime, in particular drug trafficking and money laundering. The 15-member council voted unanimously to extend through 31 May 2014 the work of the UN Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNIOGBIS) to support efforts focused on fully restoring constitutional order and medium-term stability in the country recovering from a military coup. This is in line with the suggestions that Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon made in his latest report. Presenting that report to the Council earlier in the month, Jose Ramos Horta, head of UNIOGBIS, said that if appropriate support is given towards more pro-active preventive diplomacy programmes, “Guinea-Bissau could become a shining example of a success story.”In today’s resolution, the Council requested Mr. Ban to “increase efforts to achieve greater coherence, coordination and efficiency among relevant United Nations agencies, funds and programs in Guinea-Bissau to maximize their collective effectiveness toward combating drug trafficking.”The Council also called on Guinea-Bissau authorities “to review, adopt and implement national legislations and mechanisms” to more effectively stem the flow of drugs and illegal funds in and out of the country, particularly through additional support to the Transnational Crime Unit (TCU) established under the West Africa Coast Initiative (WACI).The international community was urged to enhance cooperation with Guinea-Bissau to more effectively ensure control of its air traffic and surveillance of maritime security within its jurisdiction. Among other key points, the Council emphasized the importance of organizing an international pledging conference on the recovery of Guinea-Bissau after the holding of free, fair and transparent elections. According to recommendations in the Secretary-General’s report, the first phase of the restoration of constitutional order and stability would culminate in presidential and legislative elections, and focus on creating “a political environment built on confidence and non-interference in the electoral process.”Mr. Horta has said he expects elections to be held by November. Soldiers in Guinea-Bissau – a West African country with a history of coups, misrule and political instability since it gained independence from Portugal in 1974 – seized power on 12 April 2012.The coup d’etat came ahead of a presidential run-off election that was slated for 22 April between Carlos Gomes Júnior and a former President, Kumba Yala, prompting calls from the international community for a return to civilian rule. read more

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Duke of Sussex cant wait to introduce Duchess and Archie to second

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The Duke of Sussex says he is looking forward to introducing the Duchess and his son Archie to his “second home” Africa during an upcoming official tour.The young family will make a visit during their autumn tour of Africa while the Duke will carry out solo visits to Angola, Malawi and Botswana.Prince Harry revealed his “excitement” in a post on the couple’s Instagram account which also highlighted organisations “working towards positive change” on the continent.The post on Sunday said: “In just a few weeks, our family will be taking its first official tour to Africa, a region of the world that over the past two decades has been a second home to me.”Our team has helped create a meaningful programme that we’re so excited to share with you. On a personal note, I can’t wait to introduce my wife and son to South Africa! “We’ll see all of you very soon.” Botswana is a place Harry loves and knows well after whisking his wife to the southern African country in 2017 to mark her 36th birthday.Speaking during their engagement interview, Harry said: “I managed to persuade her to come and join me in Botswana.”And we – we camped out with each other under the stars… she came and joined me for five days out there, which was absolutely fantastic.” Baby Archie will be around five months old when his parents take him on his first official overseas trip.Harry and Meghan, who both share a passion for Africa, are said to be looking forward to deepening their knowledge of the continent’s rich culture and history. The Duke of Sussex took part in the King Power Royal Charity Polo Day in July.Credit:James Whatling The couple asked people to consider following more than 20 Instagram accounts, including Sentebale which was founded by Harry and Prince Seeiso of the Basotho Royal Family.Other organisations listed are the Nelson Mandela Foundation, Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation, African Wildlife Foundation, The Halo Trust and National Geographic. The Duke of Sussex took part in the King Power Royal Charity Polo Day in July. During the visit to Africa, the duke is likely to champion the work of his mother Diana, Princess of Wales who famously walked through a cleared landmine field in Angola to highlight the devastating injuries military munitions can cause.The duke’s charity Sentebale was founded in Lesotho, a landlocked country within South Africa, and has recently expanded its work into Malawi.Prince Harry also has a passion for African wildlife and is president of African Parks, patron of Rhino Conservation Botswana and spent part of his summer in 2016 working on conservation projects in Africa. read more

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