Routine court proceeding reveals nothing in case of body in freezer near

ST. THOMAS – Samuel Waters’ routine court appearance went off without an accused, a lawyer or a hitch.And as it’s been for the last two months since a body was discovered in a freezer on a Port Burwell area beach along Lake Erie, not much more is known about the grisly discovery in May.The only person charged in the case is Waters, 22, described by his friends as “a nice guy,” who was arrested on one count of committing an indignity to a body.There was lots of hub-bub at the beginning. The body was discovered by a local resident on May 7 at the end of Lakeshore Line, east of Stafford Road in Elgin County.That prompted a heavy police presence while an OPP helicopter lifted the freezer, then the body from the bottom of the bluff.Water was arrested a few days later and after a brief stint in custody, he was released without a full-blown bail hearing on $3,500 no-deposit bail with one surety from Port Dover. He doesn’t have a criminal record.And a publication ban was placed on any evidence taken at the hearing.Since then, it’s been radio-silence from the police. The identity of the person found in the freezer remains unknown.There’s no hint of how long the body had been in the freezer and no immediate signal of any headway in the case.On Tuesday, Waters’ case was called and a St. Thomas paralegal, acting on behalf of Waters’ defence lawyer, asked that the case be put over to Aug. 20 “to receive and review disclosure.”Waters was not required to be there and he wasn’t. He is under a court order to stay out of Elgin County and specifically Port Burwell, unless it was for court-related business.OPP spokesperson Derek Rogers said the investigators “have nothing to say at this point” and could offer no new developments.Meanwhile, in the quiet tourist town of Port Burwell, there’s both curiosity about the incident, and frustration that there hasn’t been any answers.Tammy McCord, owner of Aunt Tammy’s Off the Hook restaurant, the only early morning coffee place in the community said there have been lots of rumours and stories, but the furor has died down.“It’s like old news. People aren’t saying a word anymore,” she said. “For a while right after, it was kind of the talk of the town. Now, people are like you. They’re just frustrated because there has been nothing said.”No one felt threatened by the situation, McCord said, but there is frustration that runs throughout the community about who the deceased is. No information has been released about gender or age.“Curiosity, right?” she said. “People are wondering who is it? Is someone local? Is it someone (from) far away? It’s probably someone we don’t even know.”“I’ve never heard a story at all of who it might be.”[email protected]/JaneatLFPress We want to hear from you Send us opinions, comments and other feedback. E-mail your letter to: [email protected] (no attachments please) Or go to lfpress.com/letters. Letters should be kept to 150 words. read more

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US trade deficit widens 8 per cent in September to 418 billion

by Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Press Posted Nov 14, 2013 12:23 pm MDT WASHINGTON – The U.S. trade deficit widened in September as imports increased to the highest level in 10 months while exports slipped. The wider gap suggests growth was somewhat slower over the summer than previously estimated.The deficit increased to $41.8 billion, up 8 per cent from August, the Commerce Department said Thursday. It was the largest trade gap since May and marked the third straight month that the deficit has risen since hitting a four-year low in June.Exports, which hit a record high in June, slipped for the third straight month, dipping 0.2 per cent to $188.9 billion. Sales of commercial aircraft and autos both declined. Imports rose 1.2 per cent to $230.7 billion, the highest level since November.The deficit with China hit an all-time high of $30.5 billion.The overall economy grew at an annual rate of 2.8 per cent in the July-September quarter. An improving trade deficit contributed 0.3 percentage point to growth during that period.But Thursday’s report shows that exports rose at a slower pace than the government estimated when it issued its report on third-quarter growth last week. That could wipe out trade’s contribution to growth, economists say, and lead the government to reduce its estimate of third quarter growth to an annual rate of 2.5 per cent.So far this year, the deficit is running 11.7 per cent below the pace of 2012. A smaller trade deficit acts as a boost to economic growth when it shows American companies are earning more in their foreign sales and losing fewer domestic sales to foreign competitors.Many economists say that growth has slowed in the current October-December quarter to perhaps below a 2 per cent growth rate. They expect a rebound next year as the impact of this year’s tax hikes and government spending cuts lessen.U.S. manufacturers are hoping that rising export sales will provide a boost to offset weakness in domestic demand. Through the first nine months this year, exports are up a modest 1 per cent. U.S. companies have had to deal with weakness in Europe, which has cut into sales in that important market. Through September, exports to the European Union were down 2.7 per cent from the same period in 2012.Imports are down 0.6 per cent through September compared to the same period in 2012. Much of that decline reflects an 11.5 per cent drop in petroleum imports. The U.S. is being helped on the energy front by rising U.S. production which is lessening America’s dependence on foreign oil. The price of imported crude oil is also lower this year, averaging $97.52 per barrel through September, down from $102.25 for the same period in 2012.For September, U.S. exports of farm products showed a solid gain, led by stronger sales of soybeans, corn and wheat. But sales of manufactured goods such as aircraft, autos and computers were down. On the import side, imports of oil were up 2.7 per cent and imports of foreign-made cars and auto parts rose were up 3.4 per cent. Imports of food were down.America’s deficit with China, the largest with any country, rose 1.9 per cent to a record $30.5 billion in September and is up 2.6 per cent for the first nine months of this year, on track to set another annual record.The Obama administration on Oct. 30 released its latest report on whether countries are manipulating their currencies to gain unfair trade advantages.The report said that China’s currency, the renminbi, remained significantly undervalued but it declined to label China as a currency manipulator. Such a designation triggers negotiations and could ultimately lead to U.S. trade sanctions. American manufacturers have long contended that the Chinese are keeping their currency artificially low to make Chinese goods cheaper for American goods and U.S. products more expensive in China.The currency report, which the administration must submit to Congress every six months, also criticized Germany, saying its large trade surpluses were holding back growth in Europe. The twice-a-year report also said the administration planned to closely monitor the currency policies of Japan and South Korea. US trade deficit widens 8 per cent in September to $41.8 billion, highest in 4 months AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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